The Culinary Alphabet with a twist…The Letter I(chimichurrI)

 

Good morning everyone and Pete… time for another post which is this crazy idea from one of my fellow scribes …but food fun…I have left out a few obvious ones like Spaghetti and some like Ugli Fruit which I mentioned in a previous post…Enjoy!

Acai:

The Acai berry is a small grape-like berry native to the rain forests of South America…deep purple in colour they are being classed as a superfood and there are many claims being made about them however there are no long term studies to back these claims…Many fruit and vegetables offer a range of health benefits, and acai berries are no exception.

Aioli:

A sauce made of garlic, salt and olive oil with lemon juice I think it is similar to mayonnaise. There is an ongoing debate as to whether an aioli is healthier than its cousin mayonnaise. Mayo is essentially any neutral flavoured oil, with egg yolk, vinegar and lemon juice, whereas an aioli begins with pounding garlic, which has many health benefits, with a mortar and pestle and using olive oil instead of canola.

Arrosticini:

Traditional Lamb Skewers from Abruzzo region of Italia,

Basmati:

Basmati rice has long slender grains compared to normal rice. Whole grain Basmati rice has the lowest glycaemic index of all rice types which means once digested it releases its energy slower keeping blood sugar levels more stable.

Bhaji:

Who hasn’t eaten and onion bhaji?…No Indian takeaway is the same without them…This spiced Indian snack originated from the Indian subcontinent and is popular street food.

Did you know? The Guinness Record for the largest onion Bhaji goes to Bradford( an English) city and it weighed an impressive 102.2 kg or 225lb 4.9 oz.

Binjai:

A fruit belonging to the Mango family although it has a more sour taste and is quite fibrous…it is called yaa lam fruit here the tree flowers April-May and the flowers are so very pretty the tree, however, doesn’t bear fruit every year…

The Malay community consider the fruit a delicacy and eat it raw with sambal belacan which is a dip of chilli and fermented prawn paste which the Binjai is dipped into and eaten with rice. It is known as white mango…

Biryani:

Traditionally made with Basmati rice, spices and goat meat it is often now made with chicken or prawns…This rice dish is a favourite of ours and one I have been making for years…A perfect one-pot dish. In some regions of Indian Egg or potato may also be added.

Blini:

A Russian pancake...A blini or, sometimes, blin, is a Russian and Ukrainian pancake traditionally made from wheat or buckwheat flour and served with smetana, tvorog, butter, caviar and other garnishes. Blini are among the most popular and most-eaten dishes in Russia.

Broccolini:

Baby broccoli which has smaller florets and longer thinner stems…Broccolini is actually a cross-breed of broccoli and Chinese broccoli, a leafy vegetable commonly referred to as gai lan in Cantonese or Jie lan in Mandarin.

You get the florets found in broccoli and the longer stems and leaves found in Chinese broccoli.

Calamari:

By many Calamari and squid are thought to be one and the same…Squid and calamari are however two different beasts. Squid is cheaper and tougher; calamari is more tender and expensive. Although many fish stalls class them as one and the same I always by the small ones which are probably classed as calamari but however much does depend on the cooking…

Thai- squid-salad-authentic

This recipe is one of our favourites the kids love it.

Cannelloni:

Cannelloni is a tube-shaped dry pasta about 7 cm / 3″ long and 2cm / 2/3″ wide. It is stuffed with filling, covered in a sauce and cheese then baked. It does not need to be cooked before filling, it softens when baked in the oven.

One of my favourite ways of serving it is with a spinach and ricotta filling topped with a tomato sauce …Perfick!

Chapati:

Chapati, also known as roti,  shabaati, phulka, is an unleavened flatbread originating from the Indian subcontinent and staple in India, Nepal, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, East Africa and the Caribbean.

Chilli:

Chillies come in all shapes and sizes from mild to blow your head off heat…There are about 4,000 varieties of chilli in the world.

The heat is measured on the Scoville Scale…

Chimichurri:

Always made from finely chopped parsley the other ingredients vary they could include red wine vinegar, garlic, salt, black pepper, oregano, red pepper flakes, sunflower or olive oil is typical (plus a shot of hot water) Some recipes add shallot or onion, and lemon juice…many variations.

Enoki:

Fast becoming one of my favourite mushrooms they are lovely in soups or fried until crispy and used as a garnish they are very popular here…This mushroom has a mild, delicate flavour that is complemented by a slight crunch.  eaten raw or cooked. they are commonly used in Asian cooking but are also excellent in salads, sandwiches and pasta sauce a very versatile little mushroom which is popular in Japanese cuisine.

I love them lightly pickled…

Kiwi:

Also known as Chinese gooseberry is an edible berry about the size of a large hens egg. It has a green flesh which is sweetish and tangy this fruit also has numerous health benefits…The skin is a lightest brown and fuzzy…

Kohirabi:

A very versatile vegetable which can be roasted or paired with apple it makes beautiful fresh salad…

Lovi-Lovi:

Rich in vitamin C and antioxidants this brilliant scarlet colour little fruit is harvested to make chutneys, jam and wines.

Pepperoni:

Pepperoni is an American variety of salami, made from a cured mixture of pork and beef seasoned with paprika or other chilli pepper. Pepperoni is characteristically soft, slightly smoky, and bright red in colour. Thinly sliced pepperoni is a popular pizza topping.

Pequi or Souari fruit:

An edible fruit popular in some areas of Brazil…Pequi pulp is a very popular food in Goiás, Mato Grosso and Minas Gerais, eaten by itself raw or prepared or used as an ingredient in cooking or to flavour beverages. Pequi with rice and chicken is an especially popular preparation.

Pequi pulp will tarnish silver cutlery and, if eaten raw, the fruit is best enjoyed out of hand. Care must be taken to gently scrape the pulp off the pit using one’s teeth: The spines can detach and hurt the mouth, causing considerable pain and being difficult to remove. It can be extremely dangerous to eat – not because it is poisonous or toxic, but because it can seriously damage the unwary eater’s tongue, gums and upper palate. It’s one scary fruit!

Not a fruit I would take the chance to eat…

Piccalilli:

Also known as mustard pickle it is a British version of South Asian pickles…

Pili:

Pili nuts are a rich buttery tasting nut grown in the volcanic soil of the Philippine peninsula. Pili nuts are high in calcium, phosphorus, potassium, and rich in protein.

Ramantchi:

Is a type of plum also known as Governor’s plum, Madagascar Plum, Indian Plum…a small edible fruit which can be eaten raw, made into preserves/jam or fermented and made into a wine…it also has numerous health benefits…the leaves and roots are used in herbal medicines as a treatment for snakebite… the bark is also believed to be effective for arthritis.

Rosti:

Rosti is a Swiss potato dish made with grated potato best described as a cross between hash browns and a potato pancake. It is popular throughout Switzerland. It’s cut into wedges and served with sausages or other meats and cheeses.

Vermicelli:

Or little worms…here in Thailand they are very thin rice noodles and used in soups, stir-fries and salads…in Italy, I am told they are thicker noodles…These translucent white noodles are a great alternative to wheat noodles especially for those on a gluten-free diet.

prawns with glass noodles

Easy to prepare as they need no cooking just soak in boiling water for about 5 mins depending on the size of the noodles then use as required.

Yang mei:

Tasting like a strawberry and blackberry combined this little red berry is also known as waxberry, China Bayberry or Red Bayberry this fruit has a short season and the bush only fruits once a year which makes it a very special treat …the fruit is slightly sweet, slightly tangy and floral.

That’s all for today I hope you have found something interesting…

Stay safe, have fun and laugh a lot as you know what I am going to say it is Free and proven to be good for your health…..Laughter aside…My thoughts and prayers are with all the people who have been or will be touched by this Covid-19 virus…the new lockdowns and restrictions..stay safe be aware and social isolate where required and we will beat this thing…xx

About Carol Taylor:

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and wellbeing.

The environment is also something I am passionate about and although there are now no regular columns on my blog this year. It is important that we are mindful of the world we live in…We all need to be aware of our home’s carbon footprints…where does our food come from? How far does it travel…Simple to do but if we all did it…Not only would we support local businesses but reduce our carbon footprint…

green foot prints eco system

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…….Then, I will be happy!

Thank you once again for reading this post  …I see some of you have early snow it looks so pretty xx

 

 

17 thoughts on “The Culinary Alphabet with a twist…The Letter I(chimichurrI)

  1. Pingback: CarolCooks2…weekly roundup 1st November -7th November 2020… Recipes, Health, Whimsy, Apples and Music … | Retired? No one told me!

    1. CarolCooks2 Post author

      My thoughts exactly but people do.. There is that fish the Japanese eat that if not properly prepared you die.. Years of training to learn how to prepare it as well.. Some people like to live on the edge.. 🙄🤔🤔

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  2. koolkosherkitchen

    Интересно – надо посмотреть.ll these exotic fruit and veggies – fascinating! Blini is plural of blin. Smetana is sour cream, and tvorog is farmer cheese.
    I make aoli quite often, and it is healthier than mayo for those who are watching cholesterol because it doesn’t have eggs in it. And Chimichurri is extremely popular here in Florida.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. CarolCooks2 Post author

      Thank you for the translations I will update my post.. Chimichurri is quite similar to a Thai dip I make except I use coriander… I am going to try it though just for a change.. Yes it fascinates me the amount of different fruits and vegetables there are around the world… I hope you are keeping well dear Dolly x

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  3. marianbeaman

    There is SO much here, I have to pick just a few. Well, Basmati rice is my favorite . . . brown rice from India, so delicious and nutritious.

    I like broccoli also but never hear of broccolini, which sounds so cute, I guess because it’s tinier and more delicate than the larger stems. You are doing great work here, Carol!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

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