Category Archives: Healthy Eating

National Organic Month…what is organic and which foods are classed as organic and how are they certified?

I am firmly in the camp of those who buy fresh, organic produce from local farmers.

But what is organic and which foods are classed as organic and how are they certified?

Well, it seems that the organic food market is fast becoming a multi-million dollar industry…Should we be scared? I am!…so far in my lifetime and I could be proved wrong and am happy to be proved wrong however I don’t know of any big national conglomerate which is totally organic…

Organic farming first began as an alternative method of farming, a healthier way of farming without growing produce using man-made pesticides and fertilisers or contain and use genetically modified organisms (GMO’s)…There are still these small farmers who have no official certification but they follow to the T organic procedures and also take a whole farm approach and practise long term sustainability thus protecting the environment.

This is where local knowledge is a bonus as is getting to know your farmer…You also know that your carbon footprint is very low… Farm to the door can just be a few minutes or a few miles and delivered with a smile.

The certified large scale producers produce the food which your local stores sell…typically that food has travelled long distances…

These operations may buy specific allowable products, such as fish emulsion or blood meal to use as fertilizer rather than working within the farm to increase soil fertility. While this decrease in synthetic chemical use benefits the environment compared with industrial agriculture, these methods may not promote long-term sustainability, since off-farm products usually require greater fossil fuel use than sustainable farming practises.

Some research shows that organically produced crops have higher nutritional content than comparable non-organic crops, and some people find organic foods to be tastier.

The question remains, however, whether organic food shipped in from across the globe is truly a sustainable method of food production. Certainly organically produced food from a local farmer who employs an integrated whole-farm approach is fairly environmentally sustainable, though the economic sustainability of such an endeavour can be challenging.

Although we must decrease our reliance on fossil fuels to combat climate change, many organic policies do little to address the issue of sustainability, focusing instead on the strict list of prohibited substances, rather than a comprehensive long-term view of farming and food which your local farmer does…

It would be near nigh impossible to cover the whole world with regard to organic farming procedures and produce…Here are the top four…some surprises here for me…

China…always in the news one way or another and much of it not complimentary…I hold my hands up when I say I look at where things I wish to buy are produced and steer clear where possible…There has also not been a shortage of reports in the news citing food quality and safety scandals…HOWEVER…there is a rapidly expanding food culture plus there is a revolution in ecological food and ethical eating in China’s cities.

There is the development of a “formal” organic sector, created by “top-down” state-developed standards and regulations, and an “informal” organic sector, created by ‘bottom-up’ grassroots struggles for safe, healthy, and sustainable food. This is generating a new civil movement focused on ecological agriculture and quality food.

My research is leading me to believe that globally people are speaking and doing…not relying on the big multi conglomerates but looking at their local areas what they can do and they are doing it!

BUT…be very careful when you are buying from a small company as all is not as it first seems…Way back when I lived in the UK…I loved Burts Bees their soaps and natural products…It seems the lure of big money and trust me the big conglomerates have that…brought them out…

Brands like Burt’s Bees attract environmentally conscious consumers. They rely on being marketed as local and natural, but many people have no clue that these brands are part of globe-spanning corporations.

Quality often drops as a result.

Which leads me to conclude that will the small farmers win us over or be swallowed up? I think I know the answer to that in my heart…Yes, I am scared!

Thank you for reading..enjoy your week, laugh a lot and be kind xx

About Carol Taylor: 

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and wellbeing.

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…….Then, I will be happy!

Have a great week, stay safe and be well xx

The Culinary Alphabet with a twist…The letter E (agrafE)

Good morning everyone and Pete… time for another post which is this crazy idea from one of my fellow scribes…but food fun…E is a doozy…

Did you know?

There are 95069 words that end with E…of course, not all food-related but there are quite a few so I have not gone for the obvious many of your favourites will not be here …Brownie being one but never fear chocolate is still featured…

Abalone…

Image by 덕효 홍 from Pixabay

Or sea snails…I have never tasted these I have seen them on cookery shows and posh menus…it is also illegal to take abalone from the ocean. Numbers of abalone are now at critically low levels because of over-exploitation. Poaching is the biggest threat to abalone. People in local communities are either paid money or given drugs by large syndicates to illegally remove abalone from the ocean.

95% ​of abalone comes from aquaculture, eating non-farmed abalone is truly a rarity…

Agrafe…

Image by congerdesign from Pixabay

A winemaking term for the metal clip used to secure the cork in a bottle of champagne or sparkling wine…That was a new one for me…I didn’t know that …

Aubergine…

Is actually a colour — aubergine — that resembles the purple of the aubergine or as it is also known as the eggplant. … Apparently, way back in the 1700s, early European versions of eggplant were smaller and yellow or white. They looked a bit like goose or hen’s eggs, which led to the name “eggplant.”

 

It looks to me like the earlier European versions have had a revival or never went away as we get lots of small..tiny eggplants here and in all colours…yellow included…

Buckle…

The history of this is fascinating and shows how one dessert has many names depending on where you come from… this one has some great names…such as cobbler, pandowdy, grunt, slump, buckles, crisp, croustade, bird’s nest pudding or crow’s nest pudding.  They are all based on seasonal fruits and berries, in other words, whatever fresh ingredients are readily at hand.  They are all homemade, simple to make and rely more on taste than fancy pastry preparation.

Early settlers of America were very good at improvising.  When they first arrived, they bought their favourite recipes with them, such as English steamed puddings.  Not finding their favourite ingredients, they used whatever was available. That is how all these traditional American dishes came about with such unusual names.

The early colonist was so fond of these juicy dishes that they often served them as the main course, for breakfast, or even as a first course. It was not until the late 19th century that they became primarily desserts.

Calzone…

A folded pizza…I’m sure someone will tell me it is not just a pizza…half-moon shaped and stuffed with cheese, meat and or vegetables, fried or baked and often served with a marina sauce.

Cerviche…

This is more to my taste …raw fish cured in lime or lemon juice spiced up with chilli peppers, onions, coriander, tomatoes…like a fish salsa…

Deglaze…

Just a posh word for adding cold liquid to a hot pan and releasing all the lovely stuck on bits of meat and juices is how you make the best gravy for your Sunday Roast…

Did you know? Those brown bits are called Fond which is the French word for bottom…

Ganache…

Dieters beware this glaze or icing is made from chocolate and cream…it can be used to glaze pastries or fill pastries…

Lattice…

Lattice is the pretty topping for pies…very easy to do and just adds that little extra…

My individual latticed apple pies…

Pottage…

Is a term for a thick stew of vegetables, grains and or meat/fish this dish goes back to medieval peasants who grew what they could and cooked it slow to produce a thick stew or soup, which they ate with dark rye bread…It filled the tummy on a cold day…

Poutine…

A dish of french fries, gravy and cheese curds… originating from the Canadian province of Quebec

Not something I have eaten but it looks delicious…

Sardine…

A small oily fish which is part of the herring family…hubby loves sardines on toast as do the grandkids…according to the FDA sardines contain less mercury than other fish they are also as high in Omega 3 fatty acids as pink salmon…

Shitake…

An edible mushroom native to East Asia…it is also considered to be a medicinal mushroom in some forms of traditional medicine. They grow naturally on decaying hardwood trees…you can purchase them both fresh or dried… it is said that dried they provide a deeper more balanced medicinal effect…Here they can be sauteed and served as a side dish, they are often sliced and added to miso soup, added to stir-fries and used to make a stock base for Kombu broth, a delicious, balanced, health-promoting broth.

shitake mushroom

They are also quite a meaty mushroom although I love mushrooms and do eat these they are not among my favourites …

Treacle…

A treacle tart is…sigh…Treacle is an uncrystallised syrup made during the refining of sugar. The most common forms of treacle are golden syrup, a pale variety, and a darker variety known as black treacle. Black treacle I use in my Christmas cakes and puds and also gingerbread…

A slice of treacle Tart with custard

The golden syrup I use sometimes in a steamed pudding or make a tart with breadcrumbs and served with vanilla custard…sigh…not good for the waistline but a delicious treat…

That’s all for this week see you in two weeks for the letter F (aperitiF)…Yes, please!

Please stay safe as it seems in some places lockdowns are being introduced again…not good xx

About Carol Taylor:

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and well being.

The environment is also something I am passionate about and there will be more on this on my blog this year

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…Then, I will be happy!

Please stay safe and well and follow your governments safety guidelines remember we are all in this together xxx

Tuesday’s Topic…Breakfast Oats…

Good morning…last week I looked at breakfasts around the world and discussed how many of them are really unhealthy choices …They are ok to eat now and again but not on a regular basis.

Today I am going to look at oats … a popular breakfast dish which is easy to make or can be made and left overnight ready for the morning…

In recent years oats have been dogged by reports that they contain chemicals/pesticides which are harmful to our health  …Are there really pesticides in our oats…The short answer is Yes!

Are they harmful...That is the question…?

Glyphosates have been found in oat cereal, oatmeal, granola and snack bars…tests have shown that more than half contained levels higher than many groups of scientists believed they should have and which gave them concerns over children’s health.

Scary…as on the plus side oats have proven health benefits…they lower cholesterol, burn fat, contain lots of fibre so keep you fuller for longer and contain folate and potassium.

Many health and agriculture experts claim humans don,t absorb glyphosate in the same way as they do other chemicals like DDT.

However, the International Agency for Cancer Research classified Glyphosate as a “probable human carcinogen”

Scientists are also of the mind that just because government agencies quote legal limits to us…that legal is not the same as safe…

This month is National Organic Month…I think Oats are one of the products which we should consider buying Organic…

Yes, most organic produce has a higher price tag however many stores now have their own brand organic goods which are considerably better priced than brand names…Savvy shoppers look in the bulk aisles as often there are savings to be made there.

Coupons can be found in-store magazines, on their websites and on retailers web sites … everyone wants you to buy their brand …If you see it on offer and have the storage buy one or two extra packets…Oats stores well and can be used in many recipes…cookies, cereal bars and at least you know they don’t contain additives and lots of added sugars…I call that a win-win situation …

These are some of my favourite breakfast recipes…

Orange and vanilla oats with Citrus salsa

  • 2 Oranges or 4 clementines
  • 2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 140g porridge oats
  • 1 grapefruit, peeled, seeded and chopped…I use pomelo as grapefruit is not readily available here.
  • A small handful of mint leaves
  • 2 tbsp sunflower seeds
  • 6 walnut halves, broken
  • Natural yoghurt to serve (optional)

Peel the oranges, then finely chop 1 tbsp of the peel. Put the peel in a large bowl with the vanilla, oats and 800ml water. Cover and set aside to soak overnight.

To make the salsa, chop the oranges and mix in a bowl with the grapefruit and mint leaves. Cover and chill.

The next morning, tip the porridge oats into a pan and cook until bubbling and thick.

This recipe serves 4 ...for 2 just pour half of the porridge into two bowls and tip the remainder into a container ready to chill, top with half the salsa, seeds and nuts. Divide the other half of the salsa between the two bowls of porridge along with the yoghurt if using. Scatter with the remaining nuts and seeds. The leftover porridge can be reheated the next day with a splash of water. Top with the remaining salsa and yoghurt.

Leftover porridge… How about some pancakes?

  • 150g cold leftover porridge
  • 150g self-raising flour
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 1 ripe banana, mashed
  • 2 large eggs
  • 100ml milk
  • 2 tsp vegetable or sunflower oil
  • fruit, yoghurt and maple syrup or honey, to serve

Mix the porridge, flour, baking powder, banana, eggs and milk in a bowl. Heat the oil in a frying pan. Drop 2-3 tbsp of the porridge mixture into the pan and cook over medium heat until the underside is golden and bubbles are popping on the surface.

Flip over and cook for another few mins until cooked through, then keep warm in a low oven and repeat until you’ve used up all the batter. Serve with the fruit and yoghurt and top with a drizzle of the syrup or honey.

Enjoy!

Dairy-Free Oats…Serves 4

  • 100g rolled porridge oats (not instant)
  • 25g creamed coconut, chopped
  • 200g frozen raspberries
  • 125g pot coconut yoghurt
  • a few mint leaves, to serve (optional)

I have added a link here for Amazon Creamed coconut just in case you cannot get creamed coconut in a block where you live although Asian stores should stock it. I also don’t get a commission just saying x

Tip the oats and creamed coconut into a large bowl, pour on 800ml cold water, cover and leave to soak overnight.

The next day, tip the contents of the bowl into a saucepan and cook over medium heat, stirring frequently, for 5 -10 mins until the oats are cooked. Add the raspberries to the pan with the yoghurt and allow to thaw and melt into the oats off the heat. For 2 servings…Reserve half for the next day and spoon the remainder into 2 bowls. Top each portion with mint leaves, if you like.

Enjoy!

I love oats and they can take any toppings…I am a fan of fruit compote with my porridge, Add some cinnamon to your porridge when cooking it and top with bananas and berries, cranberry and orange make a lovely compote, for a treat try maple squash, bacon and blueberries…Very nice x

How do you eat your oats?

About Carol Taylor: 

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and wellbeing.

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…….Then, I will be happy!

Have a great week, stay safe and be well xx

How Covid-19 has changed our eating and buying habits…

COVID-19 …although devastating to many has meant that many have also discovered the joy of eating food and sharing it with their loved ones…Family time has come to the fore and people are eating together again.

People have come together and are organising food for families in need…Although individual donations to food banks have decreased company donations have gone up.

1.8 million people are now in a situation where they can’t afford to feed their families and food poverty will rise even higher. Food banks are even more important during Covid-19…

Hospitality is in crisis...in every town, village and city…Businesses are either closing or rethinking how they deliver their food to the customer…Orders are taken either on-line or in person at a distance and delivered by your friendly chef or waiter…

Bridlington in the Uk was known as the lobster capital of Europe…Because borders have closed their market has dried up…Restaurants have had to quickly adapt or go out of business…They have had to adapt and provide takeaway menus which are the same as their menus in their restaurants…Fresh lobsters delivered to their doors…

The locals are loving it...restaurant meals delivered to their doors or to pick up…these are the businesses that will survive…

Quality Eats without the seats has become the new norm…

The smaller venues have adapted quicker and faster than the big chains…I think it is great that businesses are thinking of new ways to get food to their customers and their customer base is changing it is not the huge companies it is the local people…Door to door deliveries are taking place again it is almost as if the ways of my childhood are making a comeback to survive farmers and restaurants are having to rethink their policies…

Fresh fruit direct to your door…customers are seeing the changes and they are loving it…

They are delivering milk fresh from the cows only 12 hours old daily to local homes and the customers are loving it…knowing just how fresh their milk is…They are getting to know the farmers and the restaurant owners…

It has also made the Uk government rethink their strategy they have realised that now is the time to think hard about a new food strategy…

Going forward…people need to learn how to build up a pantry without stockpiling …which means then there is food for everyone.

The food, farming, countryside Commission which is an independent body has been set up to look at radical changes… by focussing attention to implementation – turning ideas and recommendations into practical actions and real change.

With partners in governments, businesses and communities, there’re helping to convene collective leadership on the difficult questions and resource communities to become more resilient and adaptable for the changes ahead.

https://ffcc.co.uk/what-we-do#current-work

Tesco…the Uk’s largest supermarket is tackling food waste…

They have linked up with the environmental charity Hubbub to run the six-week experiment in which families will receive advice on meal planning and food storage along with recipe tips for using up leftovers.

The results from 55 households will be used by Tesco and Hubbub to offer advice and practical steps to help cut food waste, which on top of its negative environmental impact typically costs a family of four about £60 a month.

The UK has signed up to a global sustainable target of halving food waste by 2030.

Consumers are being asked to rifle through their bins in order to weigh and record their daily food waste, in an ambitious trial that aims to reduce the 6.6m-tonne mountain of food thrown away by UK households every year.

The trial takes place at a time when the UK lockdown has led to a dramatic change in the nation’s shopping and cooking habits. New polling of about 2,000 adults for Tesco found that 67% now felt differently about food. Almost a third of respondents (29%) said the pandemic had made them value food more.

“Lockdown has driven the biggest change to the nation’s food habits in generations, and many of us have experienced shortages for the first time,” said Aoife Allen of Hubbub. “Cutting food waste has proved a stubborn challenge and we are a long way from the goal of halving food waste.”

Supermarkets have been criticised for wasting food in their supply chains that could be diverted to food banks. Tesco was the first to publicise its figures.

Although this is not the first time that a UK supermarket has attempted to try this to cut food waste and indeed we all know that supermarkets waste the biggest amounts of food every day due to sell-by dates on food.

Will it be different this time? Have the COVID-109 restrictions and quarantines changed how consumers see food?

Yes, the lockdown has thrown up new challenges and in July the government’s waste advisory body, Wrap, said self-reported food waste was up by 30%, reversing progress made at the start of the pandemic as consumers threw away less food while confined to their homes.

In Tesco’s research, 35% of people said they reduced their food waste during the lockdown and 75% said they had kept this up since restrictions were lifted. Nearly two-thirds (61%) were cooking with leftovers every week, while 32% were planning meals and almost a quarter (22%) were batch-cooking and freezing more.

Only 3% of those who cut food waste during lockdown said they did not plan to continue these new habits in future. This sounds promising and maybe Tesco’s drive to cut food waste will be more successful than Sainsbury’s was in 2018.

I am excited and hope that we will see radical changes throughout the whole world as people realise that it really is good to eat with family…to cook from scratch… to buy local…to know their suppliers and maybe just maybe supermarkets will also change …

A brave New World?

Thank you for joining me today I hope you are all keeping safe and well…x

About Carol Taylor: 

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and wellbeing.

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…….Then, I will be happy!

Thank you once again for reading this post I hope you all have a fabulous week and stay safe these are troubling times xx

 

 

 

How healthy is your Breakfast?

Breakfast or brunch is the first meal of the day for most people…

It should set us up for the day and give us the energy to work or play until our next meal… What we start the day with also varies around the world and also maybe depends on the temperature…I mean if it is freezing cold and snowing we probably wouldn’t want a smoothie a nice warming bowl of porridge, breakfast casserole, garlicky oats with a masala egg something to warm the cockles of your heart as when it is bitter cold you feel hungrier so some slow-burning carbs are just what you need…

In many western countries where the temperatures for most of the year are a little more temperate where parents are busy it is often cereals and oat bars which aren’t the healthiest of options…due to high concentrations of sugars and corn starch.

There are the ever-growing murmurs from scientists as to the fact that cereals contain traces of weedkiller…

From oats to cheerios and soft baked cookies…facts are emerging as to the levels of glyphosate…a chemical identified as probably carcinogenic by the World Health Organization come on the heels of a major study published in JAMA Internal Medicine that found a significant reduction in cancer risk for individuals who ate a lot of organic food.

The diets of 69,000 people were tracked and 4 years later there was found to be a 25% reduction in cancers among those groups…

Studies have to involve large sections of society and have to be tracked and monitored over long periods of time to give a reasonable picture of accuracy …I am interested in the findings of the next one due to increased publicity in glyphosate as to whether those figures are lower…Put simply I am interested as to whether manufacturers of cereals and the consumer are listening and acting on findings…

Are continental Breakfasts any healthier…?

Continental breakfast consists of baked goods, jams, fruits, marmalades, processed cheeses, and meats, and coffee…Of course, there are some variations but generally, they are a mixture of some of the above…

Baked goods….croissants, rolls, bread, pastries…

If you want to know why I never eat commercial bread,  it’s because of the additives, preservatives, dough conditioners, and other toxic ingredients…some commercially produced bread contains human hair, hog hair, duck or chicken feathers from which by using strong chemicals to extract a protein and produce E920 otherwise known as L Cysteine which helps the bread dough to rise faster…

Some bakers use a synthetic made one which is used is not always clear on the label…Yes, we are back to labelling…

Commercially baked bread has no nutrition value unless it is stated on the label…If they are using refined white flour it is fortified with synthetic vitamins that are poorly absorbed. If they are using whole grains, the vitamins and minerals are all bound up in the bran where it is unavailable unless it has been properly prepared.

Processed cheese and meat…

Did you know that eating more than 700 grams (raw weight) of red meat a week increases your risk of bowel cancer? Or that the risk of developing bowel cancer goes up 1.18 times for every 50 grams of processed meat eaten per day?

The World Health Organization (WHO)has classified processed meats including ham, bacon, salami, and frankfurts as a Group 1 carcinogen (known to cause cancer) which means that there’s strong evidence that processed meats cause cancer. Eating processed meat increases your risk of bowel and stomach cancer. Red meat, such as beef, lamb, and pork, has been classified as a Group 2A carcinogen which means it probably causes cancer.

Processed Cheese… is not 100% cheese. Most of the time it hovers around 50% cheese, sometimes more and sometimes less, but at a base level, processed cheese is real cheese cut with other, non-cheese ingredients. Those extra ingredients can include salt, food dyes, preservatives, extra dairy, emulsifiers, or other artificial ingredients. These ingredients are added to melted, pasteurized cheese, which is then converted to a sliced solid, a jarred sauce or a spread,

That is only the bread, meats and cheese…I haven’t touched on the number of sugars in jams and spreads which just leaves the fresh fruit…which means 3 out of the 5 groups almost certainly contain chemicals, sugars, salt, and flavour enhancers.

Asian Breakfasts…

Fish- soup- STICKY -RICE

 

Consist of steamed rice, noodles, miso soup, grilled fish, pickled and fresh vegetables, raw herbs, shallots, spring onions, ginger, garlic, and of course chillies either fresh or in a dip.

Dim sum, Breakfast rice, omelette and rice, rice porridge with a poached egg and spring onions…

Breakfast in Asia is a revelation as almost anything goes…Although a protein is generally eaten for breakfast the ratio of protein to raw/steamed vegetables is about 3-1…

People in Southeast Asia drink their milk in the morning. However, people in Southeast Asia are said to consume less milk than Europeans or Americans. As you can see from the list of breakfast menu I have detailed, many of the meals contain coconut milk, but not milk from animals. Coconut milk is more of a staple, especially among adults. People consume a lot of tea, coffee, fruit and plant juices, and herbal drinks. In Indonesia, they have “Jammu,” or fresh traditional herbal drinks taken very early in the morning to prevent and treat health problems.

Are rice noodles healthy? Yes, they are, so long as you cook them in healthy ways. While rice flour is a rich source of carbs, it is actually a simple starch and a good source of glucose that your body can easily turn into energy. Unlike brown rice, white rice does not contain anti-nutrients such as phytates and lectins. Rice noodles are also gluten-free, affordable, sustainable, and quite suitable for vegetarians and vegans. You cannot call them particularly nutritious, but they become quite healthy when served with foods such as fish and vegetables.

Overall I would say the Asian Breakfasts are healthier but whatever you eat moderation has to be applied…If you constantly eat foods each and every day which have a constantly high percentage of sugars, fats, and chemicals then it will affect your health and well being …We also need to be mindful as if we apply moderation to each meal every day but are consuming chemical-laden foods then the chemical and carcinogens will build-up and our health will suffer…

I don’t like being the bearer of bad news but I feel that so many cereals are fed to children it is no wonder that their health and teeth suffer as a direct result.

If children are introduced to a variety of foods from when they first start to eat their palate and their desire to try anything will be the result…They may not like everything they try but that doesn’t matter the fact that they have tried it is good and as their taste buds develop they may like it as they get older.

I know I go on and on about cooking from scratch, growing your own where possible, buying local produce, and knowing where your fish and meat originate from but cheap imported meat from countries where food standards are not high creates all kinds of problems with our bodies and our wellbeing…We cannot keep buying cheap foods and expect to stay healthy.

It is far better to eat a lovely piece of meat which is sustainably reared and eat lots of vegetable meals for other meals and be healthier both in the body and the knowledge that we are doing what we can to benefit the planet we live on…

Thank you for reading this and please we have to change our lifestyles and eating habits for the benefit of our families and the planet.

About Carol Taylor: 

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and wellbeing.

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…….Then, I will be happy!

Thank you once again for reading this post I hope you all have a fabulous week and stay safe these are troubling times xx

Food labelling does it go far enough?

New food nutrition labelling was approved for use from January 1 2020 by the FDA…That is unless you have annual sales of less than 10 million and then you have until January 1, 2021, to comply…

The hope is that the new food labelling will make it easier to make informed choices…

The changes made include bolder and larger type …Calories are in bolder type. Showing added sugars is new and there are changes to some of the nutrients required to be shown i.e Vitamins A and C are no longer required to be displayed but Vitamin D and Potassium are as many diets are shown to have deficiencies in those vitamins.

Manufacturers are allowed to show other vitamins if they wish.

Are all ingredients listed on a label?

Food manufacturers are required to list all ingredients BUT some ingredients can be listed collectively as flavours, spices, artificial flavours, or in the case of colour additives which are exempt from certification they can just be listed as artificial colours without naming each one.

Do manufacturers lie?

Nutrition labels are NOT always factual as the law allows a margin of error of up tp 20% which many believe as I do to be over-generous.

For example, a product could show as having 100 calories when the reality is it has 120 calories…also as portion sizes quoted on labels are not recommended serving sizes …by now it is probably becoming clear that you would most certainly if you are counting calories consuming far more than you think as well as sugars.

This article shows what a preferred label would look like where it is shown how high the fats and the added sugars the new labels fall short here I think is a great idea as many people me included are not au fair with everything on labels and we need as much help as we can get when shopping we are not all trained nutritionists…

I also don’t have 20/20 vision or the time to read a continuous list of ingredients...Do you?

A label which shows main ingredients and 2% or less of ingredients plus allergy information would make our informed choices safer in the case of allergies and easier in the case of sugars, salt and fats and of course chemical additives…All shown in the link above as an example of a good label.

To top it all the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, or FDA, threw a curveball that has seriously shaken the allergy community: it temporarily relaxed food labeling guidelines. It is a move that has raised alarm particularly among those with allergies beyond the major allergens, known as the Top 8.

This article highlights the issues and concerns that people who have allergies or have children with allergies now have

As a family, we are lucky we don’t have any allergies however there are some additives which I don’t want in my food which is why I cook from scratch…

This comment from Dolly @ koolkosherkitchen on my last week’s blog post highlights some of the problems that people with allergies face…

If you allow me to add a few points, dear Carol.
First of “non-dairy” usually mean that the product does not contain lactose. It might contain casein, though, which causes pancreas inflammation in some cases (mine, for example). It is clear mislabeling since casein is also part of being dairy.
Secondly, I am by far not the only person in the world allergic to canola oil, yet many packaged products, while sometimes mentioning soy or sesame oil, neglect to mention canola oil. Case in point: Planters so-called “dry roasted” peanuts are roasted in canola oil, rather than dry-roasted.
Thirdly, food coloring, especially red and yellow, is detrimental to people with certain learning and emotional disorders, such as ADD / ADHD, Anxiety, and Depression disorders, as well as conduct disorders.
You have raised a very important issue, darling!

I most certainly was not aware that dry roasted peanuts are in fact roasted in oil…Were you?

The most commonly known foods which can cause allergic reactions are milk, eggs, fish, shellfish, tree nuts, peanuts, wheat, and soy.) However, as many foods are now imported around the world allergens in other countries may differ, among them sesame, mustard, and lupin.

I think this just shows what a minefield buying processed foods is against making your own from scratch where possible which not only saves money you can be safe in the knowledge that you are safeguarding any family members with allergies as we all know severe allergic reactions can and do kill.

About 9,500 children every year are admitted to hospitals around the world because of the reaction they have to a food allergy. 

Allergy percentages today among children are skyrocketing, especially in the heavily industrialized areas — famously referred to as the first wave allergy epidemic.

The number of hypersensitive reactions has progressed in an upward trajectory, globally, for the past 50 years. In the US, there has been an exponential growth of food allergies, notably a 50% higher increase between the periods (1997–1999) and (2009–2011), following a recent CDC food allergy statistics report.

That word upward trajectory strikes fear in me…

Tomorrow I am talking about Sugar again…and children’s teeth …That’s just for starters…sigh…when I get my nerdy head-on and start reading my hackles rise at the duplicity, cunning and downright deceit of the major food manufacturers… if we don’t challenge them then this is going to be worse for our children and our children’s children it should be a given that we should be aware and be able to make good informed choices because the labelling of processed foods is very clear as to the ingredients which also means that governing bodies and watchdogs around the world need to tighten up and issue clear guidelines which cannot be misinterpreted or abused at the cost of the health of future generations.

Also for the next few weeks when I post some of my recipes I will add an example alongside a recipe as to how a store-bought meal or dish compares as regards ingredients…These comparisons are to satisfy my curiosity as well…Just give me time to find some suitable recipes to make those comparisons. 

Until next time be well and stay safe…

About Carol Taylor: 

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and wellbeing.

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…….Then, I will be happy!

Thank you once again for reading this post I hope you all have a fabulous week and stay safe these are troubling times xx