Category Archives: Saturday Morning Market

Saturday Morning…In my kitchen…Mangoes…

Hello from my kitchen here in Thailand…There will be no Saturday morning trips to the market for a little while yet as the lockdown is still in place as is the curfew although an hour has been shaved off of that…

Up early this morning even though there was no trip to the market…I have a big box of mangoes which need to be used…My Thai family dropped mangoes and bananas off the other morning…The bananas are still green so not urgent at the moment…Six lovely big hands of bananas fresh from the banana tree…They are so caring and think of us ..bless them…I am trying to think of how I can repay them when all this is over…

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My neighbours were happy to receive them although as they gave me mangoes the other day… their tree is in full fruit I knew they wouldn’t appreciate the gift of more mangoes…Their mangoes are the giant mangoes…some of which weigh a kilo…

Back to my mangoes… some have been used to make mango smoothies all round every morning…some I have made puree and it is now drying in the sun and will make lovely dried mango rolls…So easy to do just puree a mango or two, then spread it very thinly on a tray and let the sun do its thing when it has set and dried… cut and roll..Enjoy!

dried mango

A lovely healthy little snack…

The mango jam is now made and boy was it hot in the kitchen this morning…But the jam is now in jars…The remainder of the mangoes…Yes, there are more…

But first the recipe for Mango Jam…

  • 8 ripe mangoes
  • 2 organic limes/lemons
  • 2 kaffir lime leaves, torn (optional)
  • 3 cups of raw sugar.

Peel and chop the mangoes I also added 3 of the mango pits as they were a little stringy to cut put in a heavy-based saucepan.

Wash and squeeze the lime juice into the pot and throw in the lime skin.

Add the sugar then slowly bring to a soft rolling simmer and simmer until the jam reaches 220 degrees…About 50/60 mins.

Remove the mango pits if used plus the limes plus lime leaves.

Mangoes have hardly any pectin which is one reason why I use lime or lemon is fine. It is more of a preserve than a very sticky jam but we prefer that anyway. The lime plus the Kaffir lime leaves add another dimension I think it cuts through the sweetness.

You could also add a green apple to the mango as they are high in pectin.

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Mmmm we all agreed it was lovely on the homemade bread…This is the bread recipe I always make however I replaced a cup of the white flour with a cup of buckwheat flour.

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The addition of the buckwheat flour gave the bread a better texture for sandwiches not quite as soft ….everyone commented that it was nicer and lovely toasted…I also added a little more salt the second time.

 

Mango curry is on the menu although as my son put it…there is no meat…No it is a mango curry…Heathen!…

Ingredients:

  • 3 semi-ripe mangoes…my mangoes are ripe so I picked the least ripe but they were fine.
  • 1/2 tsp Turmeric powder
  • 1/2.1 tsp Red chilli powder
  • 1/2 tsp Coriander powder
  • 1/4 tsp Cumin powder
  • 1 tbsp grated palm sugar…if you can’t get palm sugar normal sugar will do but use slightly less.
  • Salt to taste

For the seasoning:

  • 1 tbsp Oil(I used ghee)
  • 1/4 tsp Mustard seeds
  • 1/2-1 tsp Cumin seeds
  • a pinch of Fenugreek seeds ( I used fennel)
  • 4-6 Curry leaves
  • 2-3 cloves of Garlic, crushed or finely sliced
  • 1-2 green chillies, slit and deseeded
  • 1 medium-sized Onion, sliced thinly

Let’s Cook!

Peel and cut up the mangoes some recipes recommend leaving on the skin and that’s fine I prefer not to…

To the mango add chilli powder, turmeric powder, coriander powder, cumin powder and salt. Mix well and let it marinate for 10 minutes.

Heat oil/ ghee in a pan on medium heat. Add mustard seeds, cumin seeds, fenugreek (fennel)seeds to it and when it sputters, add the green chillies and curry leaves followed by garlic and sliced onions. Fry until the onions are soft and translucent.

Add the marinated mangoes and mix well. Then add about a cup of water and cook the mangoes with lid covered on a low heat for approx 5 minutes it will depend on the ripeness of your fruit so may take a few minutes longer.

Add the palm sugar and cook until it thickens about 5/10 mins.

Coorg Mango curry

Serve hot with bread or rice…

N.B I fried some curry leaves for the top as a garnish…I do love my curry leaves… if you like fruity curries you will love this…

Aston has put in an order for mangoes with coconut sticky rice and the remainder will be smoothies for the next few days…The kitchen is now shut though…I am mangoed out…

mango sticky coconut rice Thai dessert

Next week the bananas will be ready and I am assuming more mangoes will also be ready…

That’s all for this week from me please stay safe and think of others we are all in this together…x

About Carol Taylor:

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and wellbeing.

The environment is also something I am passionate about and there will be more on this on my blog this year

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…….Then, I will be happy!

Please stay safe and well and follow your governments safety guidelines remember we are all in this together xxx

 

Saturday Morning trip to the Market…Not for a few more weeks…

Saturday Morning trip to the MarketNot this Saturday morning or until further notice although as it is a food market it is still open…This market is a daily one so maybe I will try it midweek and see if it is less busy I normally go on a Saturday as there are more stalls but the no social distancing worries me…although there have been no new reported cases for 14 days now so fingers crossed,  for now my plan to avoid this market stays firmly in place…

We have been given more watermelon…It is so lovely of my neighbours but I don’t have the heart to say please no more…Watermelon overload…

Originating in Africa watermelons are pretty much available worldwide, prized not only for its water content in many countries it is also used medicinally and records show used as far back as the Egyptians.

Packed with vitamin C it is like the tomato packed with Lycopene which is a powerful antioxidant.

For me…I really am not a fan of watermelon I don’t mind it in this smoothie with other fruits and vegetables.

I used a large chunk of  Pineapple, Watermelon, yellow melon and dragon fruit. A slice of tomato, a slice of beetroot, a piece of carrot and a little crushed ice.

I have learnt a trick by watching how the stalls make a smoothie and I have a drink container that I use as a measure…Fill it with my fruit and or vegetables and then blitz and it is the perfect glassful which is great if you are just making it for one.

Then into the liquidiser and a blitz for a minute or two, add some crushed ice and blitz again…voila a lovely smoothie.

I know many of you are coffee lovers and maybe it is colder where you live at the moment …Just for you, this is a recipe my daughter gave me…I  love it …  not a coffee drinker…I am an Oolong tea girl…

However, I love coffee and walnut cake( my ) mum makes the best one of those, Martini Espresso and this smoothie…

foodiesfeed-com_oatmeal-chia-banana-walnuts1

This is a recipe that my daughter gave me along with a packet of Chia seeds as I can’t always get them here. Bananas we have in spades as they grow in abundance here so my freezer always has plenty of frozen bananas ready to make a smoothie.

  • 1 frozen Banana… I have used a freshly sliced banana.
  • 1 cup of coconut milk.
  • 2 tbsp oats.
  • 1tbsp peanut butter or you can use halved walnuts as in the picture.
  • A shot of espresso or two…
  • 1 cup of crushed ice
  • 1tsp of cinnamon, nutmeg, chia seeds and honey.

Put all ingredients in your blender and blitz away.

Pour into a glass and enjoy!

Today is also National Homemade Animal Cracker Day...I kid you not…

Animal crackers originated in Britain in 1889, when P.T. Barnum toured with his circus. British manufacturers called them animal biscuits, biscuits being the British word for cookie. The cookies were exported to the U.S. When American manufacturers made their own versions, they changed the word biscuit to cracker instead of cookie possibly because crackers have less sugar than cookies/biscuits.

 

Lily’s version of animal crackers…

iced biscuits 1

Ingredients:

• 140 gm of butter
• 100 gm of soft brown sugar
• 3 tbsp golden syrup
• 1/2 tsp vanilla essence
• 350 gm flour
• 1 tsp baking soda
• 1 egg beaten

Let’s Cook

Melt the butter, sugar and syrup and then let it cool for 10 minutes.

Sieve the flour, baking soda and pour in the melted butter plus the egg. Stir to combine.

Wrap in cling film and chill for at least 10 minutes

When chilled roll out to 5 mm thick and cut out shapes. Put on a baking tray lined with parchment and bake at 200C for about 12 minutes until golden turning the tray halfway through cooking.

Turn out onto a wire tray to cool down.

When cold enough to ice…Have fun…Lily wanted pink and white with sugar strands so everything was pink…lol
The icing apart from the first one when I showed her how to flood the biscuits she did herself…

This particular biscuit recipe is nice and the biscuits are quite soft in the middle but firm on the outside when cooked…easy for kids to cut out… it is a little crumbly and soft when not cooked but manageable…Well, Lily managed so I am sure anyone else can.

When the kiddies have made theirs #animalcrackersday

Thank you for reading this post I hope you have enjoyed it and the recipes xxx

About Carol Taylor:

 Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and wellbeing.

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…….Then, I will be happy!

Thank you again for reading enjoy your weekend and stay safe and healthy xxx

Saturday Morning trip to the Market…Not for a few weeks…

Saturday Morning trip to the MarketNot this Saturday morning or until further notice although as it is a food market it is still open…I passed it yesterday as we were travelling to Makro for our monthly shop and it was heaving… no social distancing that I could see so my plan to avoid this market stays firmly in place…

Saturday Morning Market 11th April (1)

 

I was, however, lucky to find purple carrots and purple sweet potatoes so I am one happy bunny…my lemongrass is still happily drying in the sun just one more day methinks.

I also purchased some buckwheat flour and some flour to make Patongko which are lovely fried doughnut bites of delight which I eat with golden syrup.  Taste Teaser…Recipe to follow next week…

Patongko thai fried bread

What is Buckwheat? Despite the name, buckwheat is not related to wheat and does not contain gluten. Raw buckwheat contains 71.5% carbs, while cooked buckwheat groats contain about 20% carbs. Buckwheat is very nutritious, containing both protein and fibre. It also has more minerals and antioxidants than most grains. It is also gluten-free.

Next time I make cookies or pancakes or anything which I don’t need it to rise then I am going to use the buckwheat flour or half and a half all-purpose flour depending on the recipe…

This week we have had a roast, a Thai green curry, lasagne, a good old fashioned stew with pearl barley, a shepherds pie and tonight it is toad in the hole…me I don’t eat lasagne or shepherds pie or even a roast very often so I often just cook myself Thai food…This particular stir fry is one of my favourites but boy is it hot…

This lovely spicy squid stir fry is not for the faint-hearted even I find it a tad hot but I eat it anyway…

But if you like a bit of heat, then this is just the curry for you. Just by looking at the image, you can see how hot it is…

This recipe is for two people but it is quite easy to double up the ingredients, it is also very quick to cook so prepare all your ingredients first and then in as much time as it takes to cook your rice you will have a beautiful curry.

Ingredients:

  • 200 gm squid cleaned and cut into rectangles I normally score mine with a sharp knife( it just makes them look prettier).
  • 1 shallot sliced
  • 2 cloves of garlic crushed and chopped
  • 1 tbsp Thai red curry paste
  • 1 tomato cut into 8
  • A handful of pea eggplants( optional)
  • Sm piece of fresh ginger finely cut into slivers or cubes
  • Black pepper
  • Half tbsp of coconut oil
  • 200 ml coconut milk
  • 1/2 to 1 tbsp fish sauce.
  • Sm bunch of Thai basil

Ok…Let’s Cook!

Heat the oil in a wok until it is very hot and add garlic, shallots and curry paste, stir fry for 30 seconds.

Add tomatoes, ginger and pea eggplants if used and stir-fry for 1 minute.

Add squid and pepper and stir-fry for a further 1 minute.

Add coconut milk and fish sauce stir well and cook on low heat for 2 minutes, stir in Thai basil.

Serve with steamed rice and……. Enjoy!

What are pea eggplants? As the name suggests they look just like peas…Don’t they?

Pea egg plants

But that is where the similarity ends…an exciting heirloom of exotic old Siam they are round, green and the size of peas with fruit hanging in clusters of 10-15 fruit. They have a wonderful, strong, rich eggplant taste, perfect for stir-frying, relish, pickles, soups and curries.

Pea eggplants are thin-skinned and contain numerous flat, round, brown seeds and can taste slightly more bitter than Thai apple eggplant which is used in Thai Green Curry. If you really want to achieve an authentic Thai taste especially when making curries, don’t try cooking without it!

I love it! Not so the rest of the family they pick them out…Another love it or hate it food…

However, this little berry is packed with potassium just watch out though when they’re cooked because they can explode in your mouth, like a little heat bomb, if you’re not careful…

That’s all for today…we are now on a nightly curfew and an alcohol ban until the end of April…But bless the little man from the corner shop he popped round this morning to ask if we wanted him to drop some beer round and how many cases… were the men relieved ..Yes, they were as after a long hot day they love their cold beer…

Wishing all who celebrate Easter or Passover a joyous one but stay safe and well…

Thank you for reading this post I hope you have enjoyed it and the recipes xxx

About Carol Taylor:

 Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and wellbeing.

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…….Then, I will be happy!

Thank you again for reading enjoy your weekend and stay safe and healthy xxx

 

 

Saturday Morning Market…Not for a few weeks…

Saturday Morning MarketNot this Saturday morning or until further notice although as it is a food market it is still open…

Saturday Morning Market 4th April

I am torn between supporting the local community and the small farmers however my survival instinct has kicked in and I do not want to take a chance, not just with my health but my families health.

I have also been very, very lucky as my Thai family arrived at the crack of dawn the other morning masked up and left us sacks of rice, boxes and bags of fresh vegetables, fruit, herbs plus meat and fresh honey all fresh from the farm…How wonderful was that… it made me cry they are so loving, caring and thoughtful …Beautiful souls…

Much more than we could possibly eat/freeze which meant  I  could share with my neighbours… the remainder I am madly cooking and searching for recipes for lemongrass and eggplants…

Today is also National Carrot Day…

Carrots…The national carrot day was founded fairly recently in 2003 to be exact…Its aim to encourage people to eat carrots and promote the health benefits of eating carrots.

I love carrots but my new favourite carrot is the purple carrot…it looks vibrant on the plate and makes sure I eat my purples…

My Pineapple and Carrot Cake...tried and tested.

This is a really lovely moist cake and we all liked the addition of the pineapple and for Easter. You could also add some of those little carrot icing shapes you can buy but it is so hot here that the icing melts within minutes as you can see………

pineapple and carrot-cake

Ingredients:

• 2 and 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
• 2 tsp baking powder
• 1 tsp baking soda
• 1/2 tsp salt
• 1 and 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
• 1/2 tsp EACH ground cloves, ground ginger, + ground nutmeg
• 1 cup of coconut oil
• 1 and 1/4 cup packed light or dark brown sugar
•  4 large eggs, at room temperature
• 1 tsp pure vanilla extract
• 3 large carrots, grated (about 2 cups)
• 1 cup (8 ounces) crushed pineapple, drained
• 1 cup chopped walnuts

Cream Cheese Frosting

• 8 ounces full-fat block cream cheese, softened to room temperature
• 1/2 cup butter, softened to room temperature
• 3 cups icing sugar, plus an extra 1/4 cup if needed
• 1 tsp pure vanilla extract
• 1/8 tsp salt

Let’s Cook!

Preheat the oven to 350°F (177°C) and grease a 9×13 inch pan. I always use my glass dish.

Whisk the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, and other spices together in a large bowl. Set aside.

Whisk the oil, brown sugar, granulated sugar, eggs, and vanilla extract together in a medium bowl. Pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients and whisk until combined.

Fold in the grated carrots, pineapple, and walnuts.

Spread batter into the prepared pan. Bake for 45-55 minutes. Baking times vary, so keep an eye on yours.

The cake is done when a toothpick inserted in the centre comes out clean. If you find the top or edges of the cake is/are browning too quickly in the oven, loosely cover it with aluminium foil.

Remove the cake from the oven and set on a wire rack. Allow the cake to cool completely. After about 45 minutes, I usually place it in the refrigerator to speed things up it’s so hot here nothing cools down properly unless you put it in the fridge.

Make the frosting:

In a large bowl using a handheld or stand mixer fitted with a paddle or whisk attachment beat the cream cheese and butter together on high speed until smooth and creamy.

Add the icing sugar, vanilla, and salt. Beat on low speed for 30 seconds, then switch to high speed and beat for 2 minutes.

If you want the frosting a little thicker, add the extra 1/4 cup of icing sugar (I added it).

Spread the frosting on the cooled cake.

Refrigerate for 30 minutes before serving. This helps sets the frosting and makes cutting easier.

Cover leftover cake tightly and store in the refrigerator for 5 days although that was immaterial here it just disappears…lol

Eggplants something I have kilos of...I have shared as many as I can so we are eating eggplants raw and cooked with everything it was with spicy liver the other night and also with the stirfried pork I cook with grapow instead of beans I have been using eggplants…

  • 100 gm Pork loin thinly sliced
  • 6-8 Thai eggplants quartered.
  • 2-4 cloves of garlic
  • 1-5 Thai chillies
  • Krapow …A big bunch of Thai sweet basil  Leaves picked and as you can see from the photo I use quite a lot.
  • 1 tbsp Oyster sauce
  • 1 tbsp soy sauce
  • 1/2 tsp black soy.
  • A splash of cooking oil…I use Coconut oil.
  • A good shake of seasoning..not sure if you would get the one I use here but if not just a little pork/chicken seasoning salt.

Peel garlic and cut chillies finely at this point I put in a pestle and mortar as it brings out the flavour. If you don’t eat your food very hot like us then just cut chillies and garlic finely.

Add a splash of oil to a hot wok and add chillies and garlic cook stirring for 1 minute being careful the garlic doesn’t burn.

Add the eggplants and cook for 1-2 mins then add pork and stirfry until pork cook about 3-4 mins.

Add all sauces and stir cooking for 1 minute. Add a little hot water if the sauce is too strong.

Lastly, stir in your herbs and allow to wilt slightly serve with rice and a fried egg if liked.

I have tried this with the herb grapow and Thai basil but any basil would suffice.

Enjoy!

You can also make a very nice, spicy dip called Jeow Mak Kheua which is eaten with sticky rice and or fresh vegetables a very popular eggplant dip here in Issan(Northern ) Thailand.

The Thai Eggplant…

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Eaten both cooked and raw here …Eggplant is a high-fibre, low-calorie food that is rich in nutrients and comes with many potential health benefits. From reducing the risk of heart disease to helping with blood sugar control and weight loss, eggplants are a simple and delicious addition to any healthy diet.

The Thai eggplant is about 1.5 inches in diameter and looks pretty similar to a golf ball with a stem. The colour can be medium green, pale green, or white with green stripes. What makes it unique is the crunchy texture and mild flavour. That’s why it can be enjoyed raw without removing the skin.

Surprisingly while the eggplant is eaten as a vegetable here it is, in fact, a fruit it also belongs to the Nightshade family.

That’s all for today…

Thank you for reading this post I hope you have enjoyed it and the recipes xxx

About Carol Taylor:

 Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and wellbeing.

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…….Then, I will be happy!

Thank you again for reading enjoy your weekend and stay safe and healthy xxx

 

 

Saturday Morning Market…Not this week…

Saturday Morning MarketNot this Saturday morning or until further notice although as it is a food market it is still open…I, however, do not want to take that chance so for the foreseeable I will regale you with fruits and vegetables that I have already discovered…it will help me while away the time …instead of just eating…sigh…

Saturday Morning Market 28st March

I have also taken this exile as a prompt to have a clear-out..some 500 plus posts are now in the Trash and at some point, I probably will resurrect some of them and the others will go to the permanently deleted bin…

In the meantime, I will share with you some of the lovely fruits and vegetables that I have already discovered here and love to eat or not…

This tiny little sweet and sour fruit is part of the Sapindaceae family which includes lychee, longan and rambutan.

It is a tiny little fruit which grows wild and is often called the wild lychee the tree it comes from is enormous and the fruit so tiny it also quite rare to find… I came across this fruit quite by chance when I took a ride back from the market in a tuk-tuk. I have not had the pleasure of finding any since maybe one day as they are a beautiful little fruit.

My tuk-tuk driver had a bag of these in the back of his tuk-tuk and me being nosey asked him what they were he told me to try some which I did ..of course…when I expressed my pleasure he gave me some…Thais are very generous… if you try what they offer and you like it you will always be gifted some. He told me that he had a tree in his village which was where he got the fruit from…his snack for the day…

korlan fruit on bunch

When peeled they look like very small lychees and I could find very little information about this lovely little fruit… It may be found locally on markets or often people just sit on the sidewalk with a few fruits and vegetables from their land which they are selling to make a few baht but this is also where you come across unusual fruits and vegetables which are not commercially grown or they are just grown wild.

Korlan fruit with one peeled

Found also in Laos and Myanmar it is not grown commercially or generally cultivated so quite rare.

Korlan... the rare wild fruit juice has a delicious and unique taste of sour and sweet variety with health benefits from vitamins and antioxidants.

It is said to regulate blood sugar and also to improve concentration and stress. Locals say eaten daily or taken as a syrup/extract made from the fruit it gives increased energy and boosts the immune system, therefore, combating flu viruses and colds. I could certainly do with some of them right now…

korlan fruit in chilli sauce

My daughter in law said they were also eaten with dried chilli, fish sauce and lime they were quite nice and as I didn’t have enough to make a syrup we enjoyed them just like this… this type of dip/sauce is quite commonly eaten with fruits.

The stones if I had thought I could have maybe sprouted them and had my own tree…next time methinks…

Have you come across this fruit?? Do you have any recipes using this fruit?? If so I would love to hear from you in the comments x

The Tamarind is very plentiful here and used in many Thai dishes …I love just eating the fruit it has quite a sour taste but I like it…It is sold in little packs here on the markets the seeds already removed or as a paste to add to food. It is also sold dried and sugared as a snack food and although sugared is still has quite a sour…taste…

These rather plain brown pods of fruit do, however, have the capacity to elevate your food to something else.

Tamarind like many fruits and vegetables has a long history of healing and aiding stomach disorders and is used as a laxative.

Tamarind preparations are used for fevers, sore throats, inflammation of joints and sunstroke. The leaves dried or boiled are made into poultices to help reduce swollen joints, sprains, boils, haemorrhoids and conjunctivitis.

Tamarind is also great as a marinade for meat as it breaks down and tenderises tougher cuts of meat. It is used to make jams and syrups it is also one of the secret ingredients of Lea & Perrins  Worcestershire sauce which is a fermented sauce which has many uses.

Great for smoothies a mango and tamarind smoothie is very nice it also has many other culinary uses.

This little dip is a recipe from Bali given to me by my grandson’s girlfriend it is very easy to make but made more special by the addition of tamarind. 

Called Rujak sauce it is lovely with mangoes.

  • Take 200 gm of palm sugar shaved.
  • 15 gm of tamarind flesh and 5 tbsp of water leave to infuse for 5 mins and then drain and keep the tamarind flavoured water.
  • 6 or more Thai chillies.
  • 1/4 tsp shrimp paste and 1/4tsp salt.

Blitz all these ingredients together and you have fiery little sauce.

It is hard for me to pick a favourite dish made with Tamarind  Beef Rendang is a recipe given to me by my friend Mamik and it is very nice the beef is amazing. It is also my go-to recipe if I want that special dish to impress although there are many ingredients and it has quite a long prep time it is so worth it and as I said earlier if I am having guests a really lovely dish.  rich and flavoursome it tastes amazing…This recipe will be in my cookbook…

Another of my favourites is Miang Kham although I have made it at home some markets sell all the little bits ready cut in bags with the sauce much easier and they taste just the same as much of the food sold on the markets here is made in home kitchens and sold on the market…

miang-kham-1188212_1920

 

Ingredients: Filling:

  • 3/4 cup grated coconut (this is often available in the baking section of most supermarkets) if you are not as lucky as me and can buy from our local fresh markets.
  • 2 small limes, unpeeled (try to get limes with thin skin), cut into small cubes
  • 6 tablespoons shallots, peeled and cut into small cubes
  • 6 tablespoons roasted peanuts
  • 6 tablespoons small dried shrimps
  • 4-5 fresh Thai chillies, cut into small slivers
  • 4 oz fresh ginger, peeled and cut into small cubes.

Ingredients: Sauce:

  • 1 tablespoon shrimp paste, roasted until fragrant
  • 2 oz fresh galangal, cut into slivers and roasted until fragrant (see note below)
  • 1/4 cup grated coconut, roasted in a low-heat oven until lightly brown
  • 4 oz small dried shrimps.
  • 2 oz shallots, peeled and coarsely cut
  • 1.5 teaspoons fresh ginger, sliced
  • 8 oz palm sugar (broken into small chunks)
  • 2 tablespoons table sugar
  • 1 tbsp tamarind soaked in 3 tbsp water for about 10 mins.
  • salt for seasoning

Let’s Cook!

The Sauce.

In a pestle and mortar, pound together the shallots and galangal until fine (note about galangal: it’s ok to use dried galangal as long as it’s placed in a dish of lukewarm water for a few minutes to reconstitute). Add roasted shrimp paste, ginger, coconut and dried shrimp, and continue pounding until smooth. Remove the mixture and place in a pot with 1.5 cups water. Bring to a boil over medium heat, add palm sugar and table sugar, then reduce heat and simmer, wait until reduced to 1 cup or a bit less. Add tamarind liquid. Taste, and adjust by adding a bit of salt. Remove from heat and transfer to a small bowl.

Wrapping Leaves

Your choice of what leaves to use is up to you. Some use lettuce or spinach leaves due to ready availability, but to get an authentic flavour you should use the fresh Betel Leaves.

To serve:

Roast the coconut in a low-heat oven until lightly brown. Spoon the roasted coconut into a serving plate. In separate small bowls, arrange each filling ingredient listed above. With a fresh wrapping leaf in hand, fold it once across the bottom then sideways to form a pocket. Place about 1 teaspoon toasted coconut in the leaf together with a small amount of each filling to create a bite-sized quantity. Spoon the sauce on top, pop in your mouth and enjoy!

Although this can be a little time-consuming to prepare it is well worth it.

Thank you for reading this post I hope you have enjoyed it and the recipes xxx

About Carol Taylor:

 Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and wellbeing.

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…….Then, I will be happy!

Thank you again for reading enjoy your weekend and stay safe and healthy xxx

 

 

 

 

 

Saturday Morning Market…Mandarin Oranges and Rosella Fruit…

I love Saturdays as the small traders come with their produce from their little bit of land this is where I find the unusual the fruits or vegetables which are not raised commercially but just local grown like they have been for centuries…I am also pleased to see how many of the stalls now are ditching the plastic and using banana leaves to wrap foods…

Lively and bustling the markets here sell everything from meat, fish, fruit, vegetables, curry pastes, rice, clothing, garden pots and knives you name it it is sold here…On a Saturday I will share with you what I have found…

This week there were lots of mandarins in all shapes and sizes but the kids love the small juicy ones, dragon fruit is plentiful as were the mushrooms today some of which have already found their way into a carbonara for the kiddies…I have noticed that certain veggies were a lot smaller I think the lack of rain is hindering their normally prolific growth. Tomatoes are all lovely red just right for a base for chilli, curry or spag bol…There are also still lots of Dragon fruit a very pretty fruit which is not a favourite of mine but lovely in a smoothie…I think I have so much choice that I am getting picky…

The markets are still bustling here although many more people are wearing face masks than normal…Bars etc are on lockdown but the open-air markets are still operating fully…

I have heard in many western countries that the shelves are bare and many people are unable to get even the basics which is awful I really abhor the practice of stripping and stockpiling food without any thought for others…

Often though the fresh fruit and vegetable sections are offering a choice…Buy them as many veggies and fruits can be pickled, frozen, made into pesto…You could double quantities and freeze a portion or two…vegetable stirfries are lovely…

The fruit is plentiful here I would say all-year-round…Fruit and vegetables can be used in smoothies it will all help to boost your vitamin intake especially now with this Covid-19…

Here are some ideas from what you can add to a smoothie…

tropical sunshine in a glass header

https://carolcooks2.com/2017/03/20/tropical-sunshine-in-a-glass-take-5/

Rosella Fruit.

When I first saw this beautiful fruit I had only ever seen them dried before not fresh…it was something new to try… I just love it when I come across something I have not used or seen before…I get so excited.

Rosella grows easily here as it loves a tropical climate it is also a very pretty plant the species grown here in Thailand has broader leaves and pink rather than cream flowers and the leaves are used more than the fruits.

In Australia, it is still thought by many to be an exotic plant but has been mentioned in early Australian history and known by many as “Bush Tucker”

Also known by the more recognisable name of Hibiscus it is rich in Vitamin C and when made into a tea is promoted as a cure for colds if taken regularly.

A very nice sugar syrup can also be made for using in cocktails…Just saying!

The first time I made this jam …I only made a small amount as I was not familiar with the fresh fruit or the taste…but what a revelation it was beautiful…
Ingredients:

rosella flowers

  • 500 gm Rosella fruit, seedpod separated from the Calyx and Bracts ( cut into small pieces)
  • Approx 2 cups Sugar depending on the exact weight of fruit.
  • Approx 2-3 cups Water

Firstly I soaked the fruits in cold water for about 20 minutes so as to not only clean them but remove any insects they can be susceptible to little bugs.

It was then a case of removing the seed pod from the inside of the fruit…Covering the seed pods with water and cooking them for about 20 minutes.
The seed pods contain naturally produced pectin…I simmered these for about 20 minutes and then removed the pods and disposed of them aka binned them. Remember to keep the cooking water.

I weighed the flowers before cooking them and then I measured exactly half their weight of sugar.

rosella fruit in pan
The Rosella flowers were then added to the cooking water in which the seed pods were cooked and the fruits cooked until they were softened and the liquid starts to turn syrupy which took about 10 minutes I then added the sugar and cooked the fruit until it softened and turned jam-like…

Remove from the heat and put in sterilised jars…

The key to this recipe is to weigh the fruit and do the exact amount of sugar and water.
This makes a very nice fruit preserve and one which I make again and again every year.

N.B. I  now cut the fruit into smaller pieces rather than leave them whole.

Now you all know me well and know I can’t resist thinking would it be like if I added some ginger and chilli…very nice as it happens…

Rosella Relish

rosella-fruit-relish

Ingredients.

  • 250 gm Rosella fruit
  • 60 ml of sugar
  • 2cm piece fresh ginger grated finely
  • 2 red shallots chopped finely
  • 5 ml red chilli powder/flakes
  • 10 ml apple cider vinegar
  • 375 ml of water
  • A pinch of salt

Let’s Cook!

Remove the red portions/calyces & discard the seed pods
Wash & place in a pan along with water, shallots, ginger, sugar, salt and chilli flakes
Bring to a soft rolling boil and cook until the liquid is greatly reduced. This takes approx 25-30 mins.
When the chutney is almost done, add the vinegar and stir well.
Remove the pan from the heat and allow to cool slightly and put in a sterilised glass container.

Lovely as a relish with cold/ hot meats or in a burger… with brie and freshly made bread, it is very nice.

That’s all for this weeks Saturday Market…

Thank you for reading this post I hope you have enjoyed it and the recipes xxx

About Carol Taylor: Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and wellbeing.

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…….Then, I will be happy!

Thank you again for reading enjoy your weekend and stay safe and healthy xxx

Saturday Morning Market…Apricots, Maprang fruit, Pickled Pineapple…

I love Saturdays as the small traders come with their produce from their little bit of land this is where I find the unusual the fruits or vegetables which are not raised commercially but just local grown like they have been for centuries…I am also pleased to see how many of the stalls now are ditching the plastic and using banana leaves to wrap foods…

Lively and bustling the markets here sell everything from meat, fish, fruit, vegetables, curry pastes, rice, clothing, garden pots and knives you name it it is sold here…On a Saturday I will share with you what I have found…

My very first taste of really fresh honey when I came here was from a seller on the beach…we were sitting on the beach having a sundowner…..fending off the ever-present sellers of touristy bits and bobs…….When a man appeared carrying a very heavy-looking bucket ….what did he have…I couldn’t resist I had to look and what a surprise…it was fresh, very fresh honeycomb..and he strained into a bottle…it was the most glorious bottle of fresh honey…just had to purchase..it tastes so fresh and very lightly scented with floral notes and a beautiful golden colour…

Saturday Morning Market 14th March

The lovely honeycomb pictured is what Lily brought with her from the farm…she loves honey as much as I do…especially when it is as fresh as this is…she knows how much Nannie loves it as well…

I love Apricots and have only been able to purchase them here brined in salt which are ok they take a little getting used to until now that is and I spied these much smaller than the Apricots I have eaten in the UK but the same furry skins and taste just smaller. I think maybe I will do some in syrup or a light juice not sure I am looking at recipes at the moment…They are not big enough to stuff but maybe I can use in rice for a change or maybe a chutney or stuffing…Has anyone got any ideas?

The pineapple season is in full swing so much fruit at the moment as it is our high season and hot it topped 40C today…I love pineapple shakes and just eating the lovely sweet fruit it seems so much juicier here…I also love pickled pineapple …pickled with jala[eno peppers they are perfect with cheese…

  • 300 gm of fresh pineapple cut into smallish chunks
  • A handful of shallots finely sliced
  • 1 pickled jalapeno sliced
  • 1/4 cup of water
  • 1 1/2 cups of white vinegar
  • The juice of 2 fresh limes
  • 1 tbsp sugar
  • 1/2 tbsp salt
  • A handful of chopped coriander
  • 3 sterilised jars with lids.

Heat the vinegar, water, sugar, salt, limes and Jalapenos together and bring to a rolling boil. Turn off the heat add the shallots and leave the mixture to cool down.

Spoon the pineapple and coriander into the prepared jars and cover with the vinegar mixture. Add the lids and leave to cool down before putting in the refrigerator.

pickled-pineapple

Leave for 1-2 days before eating.

N.B Some recipes say use pickled jalapenos and some say to use fresh Jalapenos… I use either …

If you use pineapple juice the cut down on the sugar you use.

If you enjoy pickles what unusual pickles do you make????? Please let me know in the comments…I would love to know 🙂 x

Mangoes...again so many at the moment ours are not ripe yet to eat but the markets are full of them…I for one cannot resist I buy mine from a little old lady she doesn’t many like the others just s few and often I have to give her a gentle shake as she is dozing they have a very early start probably about 4 in the morning and are there most of the day so it is a common sight to see stallholders dozing off in a corner…today I spied the lovely Majong fruit which is now in season, green mango, lots of herbs and some fish.

mackerel green mango marian fruit and herbs

Majong fruit is the smallish lemon coloured fruit on the left-hand side of the image…This lovely fruit has a very short season and is likened to the mango but the taste is nothing like a mango…Also called the Marian Plum by some this small, oval-shaped fruit, small enough to fit wholly within the palm of your hand, is green when young, but will turn a deep yellow-orange when ripe.

Many Thais prefer to eat this fruit before it is fully ripened…a cross between mango and plum, with just a hint of sour flavour on the surface right under the skin which gives way to a sweet fruit beneath.  It’s a lovely combination of sweet and sour, which many look forward to eating each year! In fact, the entire fruit is edible, from the skin to seed, however, the seed is quite bitter, so not many will eat them.  The leaves are used cut up in salads or cooked.

Due to its short season, it is one of the more expensive fruits ..it is high in Vitamin C, fibre and has quite a high water content…I like this fruit very much.

That’s all for this weeks Saturday Market…

Thank you for reading this post I hope you have enjoyed xxx

About Carol Taylor: Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and wellbeing.

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…….Then, I will be happy!

Thank you once again for reading this post I hope you all have a fabulous weekend xxx