Category Archives: Thai Food

The Culinary Alphabet with a twist…The letter G ( nutmeG)

Good morning everyone and Pete… time for another post which is this crazy idea from one of my fellow scribes …but food fun…

G is not quite another doozy…  more processes but still culinary processes with a few foods thrown in…

 

Butterflying:

pork loin gruyere cheese onions

To butterfly in cooking terms is to cut a piece of meat, fish or poultry nearly in half and flatten it out…Prawns are often butterflied when being prepared for the BBQ…A leg of lamb butterflied and stuffed then rolled is a wonderful thing as is this loin of Pork...All you need is a sharp knife and the know how…click the link above and I will show you how easy it is to do…

Charbroiling:

Charbroiler grilling is defined as “the process used when an item is cooked on a grated surface to sear in the flavours and impart a degree of charring which gives the product a light charcoal smoke flavour.” Charbroiling will expose food to temperatures often in excess of 260 °C (500 °F).

Egg:

Comes from a chook/duck/goose/quail/turkey, ants or fish…Caviar being one of the most expensive of eggs…The most expensive of all caviar, and indeed the world’s most expensive food is ‘Almas’, from the Iranian Beluga fish – 1 kg (2 lb 3 oz) of this ‘black gold’ is regularly sold for £20,000 (then $34,500). Almas is produced from the eggs of a rare albino sturgeon between 60-100 years old, which swims in the southern Caspian Sea where there is apparently less pollution.

Caviar is traditionally eaten directly from the skin between the index finger and the thumb. The eggs are rolled slowly around the mouth and pop to release the flavour.

Ant eggs are a popular food here and can be found on most market stalls and indeed make a lovely salad or are good in a soup…But if you want to know the weirdest of eggs to eat think shark egg, penguin, Emu, Turtle, Snail eggs…and of course the most expensive chocolate egg comes from Choccywoccydoodah – €31,000. When it comes to luxury Belgian chocolate, look no further than British-based chocolaterie, Choccywoccydoodah. …Hows that for an Easter Egg?

Etrog:

Is the yellow citron or Citrus medica used by Jews during the week-long holiday of Sukkot as one of the four species. The Etrog (citron fruit), Lulav (frond of date palm) Hadass (myrtle bough) and Aravah (willow branch) – are the four species the Jewish people are commanded to bind together and wave in the sukkah, a temporary booth constructed for use during the week-long festival of Sukkot.

Fig:

There is nothing quite like a beautiful fresh fig...one of my favourite things …

Glug:

Is a hollow gurgling sound or series of sounds as of liquid being poured from a bottle. i.e some recipes call for a glug of Olive oil…it is a word I am quite familiar with as my mother used to refer to a glug of oil or wine…is a British thing I ask…so many of my American friends have queried my use of the word.

Gochujang:

My new favourite chilli paste…it is a Korean hot pepper chilli paste…used for marinades, added to dipping sauces or your soups and stews if you want to spice things up a little…

Goreng:

A Malaysian word which is applied to noodles or rice which are fried with meat, fish or vegetables as in Nasi Goreng a popular Malaysian fried rice dish often served for breakfast.

Homogenising:

Is process milk goes through where fat is emulsified thus the cream then does not separate. As a child, a treat was the gold-topped milk which had a layer of cream…it comes from Jersey or Guernsey and although pasteurised it is not homogenised…One of my childhood memories…

Icing:

Icing, or frosting, is a sweet, often creamy glaze made of sugar with a liquid, such as water or milk, that is often enriched with ingredients like butter, egg whites, cream cheese, or flavourings. It is used to coat or decorate baked goods, such as cakes.

Jug:

To “jug” is to stew or boil a hare or a rabbit in an earthenware jug or a jar…an old fashioned method of cooking before we had slow cookers and the like.

Maprang:

Or Marian plum is a lovely golden plum grown here in Thailand…

Maprang fruit is a smallish lemon colour fruit…This lovely fruit has a very short season and is likened to the mango but the taste is nothing like a mango…Also called the Marian Plum by some this small, oval-shaped fruit, small enough to fit wholly within the palm of your hand, is green when young, but will turn a deep yellow-orange when ripe.

Many Thais prefer to eat this fruit before it is fully ripened…a cross between mango and plum, with just a hint of sour flavour on the surface right under the skin which gives way to a sweet fruit beneath.  It’s a lovely combination of sweet and sour, which many look forward to eating each year! In fact, the entire fruit is edible, from the skin to seed, however, the seed is quite bitter, so not many will eat them.  The leaves are used in salads or cooked.

Due to its short season, it is one of the more expensive fruits here ..it is high in Vitamin C, fibre and has quite a high water content…I like this fruit very much.

Nutmeg:

Originating from the dark-leaved evergreen Myristica fragrans tree in Indonesia, the seed is now grown and used globally, mostly for cooking but sometimes as a narcotic. However, for the purposes of getting high, nutmeg is not a commonly used substance.

One of my favourite spices which is great as a topping for rice pudding or an egg custard tart…

Nog:

Any beverage made with beaten eggs usually mixed with alcoholic liqueur…Egg Nog is a good example especially popular during the cold months of the year. There is nothing like a good glass of egg nog topped with a sprinkling of nutmeg I have lovely memories of my nana making egg nog and letting me have sneaky sip…

That’s all for this week see you in two weeks for the letter H (noocH)…

Please stay safe as it seems in some places lockdowns are being introduced again…not good xx

About Carol Taylor:

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and well being.

The environment is also something I am passionate about and there will be more on this on my blog this year

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…Then, I will be happy!

Please stay safe and well and follow your governments safety guidelines remember we are all in this together xxx

 

How to make the perfect Stir Fry…

What is a Stir Fry…?

Fish, meat, noodles or vegetables cooked in a small amount of oil over high heat while stirring briskly…Originating in China it has spread into other parts of Asia and the West.

I will be honest I struggled with stir fry’s when I lived in the UK now it is second nature to me…it is also the main method of cooking here…

I think the closest western countries come to stir-frying is sauté. It is also because food is cooked so quickly called blitz cooking by some…

The main sauces I use to stir fry are:

  • Oyster Sauce- richly flavoured, dark brown sauce made from oysters with salt and water.
  • Light Soy Sauce- Thai soy sauce has a mild and soft salty flavour not present in many other Asian soy sauces.
  • Dark Sweet Soy- very similar to Indonesian kecap manis, this syrupy sauce is thick, dark, and sweet. Also used as a dipping sauce.
  • Black Soy Sauce-a strong and bold, salty, and somewhat sweet soy sauce with a strong molasses flavour…I only ever use about 1/4 tsp for colour rather than flavour.
  • Mushroom Soy Sauce…made from mushrooms it can be used interchangeably with plain light soy sauce. It’s just a matter of preference…mine is the mushroom soy.
  • Golden Mountain Seasoning- a popular brand here and can be used instead of Maggi again its personal preference.
  • Maggi Seasoning- another popular seasoning sauce
  • Sesame Oil- an edible vegetable oil used sparingly in some of my stir-fries.
  • Soy Bean Paste-also is known as yellow bean sauce and salted soybeans, a much loved Thai condiment. There is also no doubt that it will heighten the flavour of food. Use in stir-fries particularly morning Glory.
  • Fish Sauce-made from fish or krill that have been coated in salt and fermented for up to two years.

Of course, there are other sauces used in stir-fries but these are my larder staples…I also buy the best that I can… like anything we all have favourites and there are many different makes…The only thing I will say is that with Soy sauce, in particular, they do vary greatly on whether you buy Thai Soy or Chinese/Korean Soy and do make a difference to the flavour of your stir fry.

Stir-fries are lovely because you can use anything and I do…I very rarely measure, weigh my meat, fish, noodles or veg… I go by eye …I think many cooks do this especially if they cook a dish often…

It also makes a difference in what type of heat you use...Gas or open fire and yes many Thais still cook on an open fire is better as your pan or wok heats up quicker and hotter and it does affect the taste especially with vegetable stir-fries like Morning Glory.

Other ingredients I always use in a stir fry…Again these are my staples for a stir fry.

  • Garlic
  • Chillies
  • Thai Basil
  • Holy Basil
  • Fresh Ginger
  • Kaffir Lime Leaves
  • Fresh Lime Juice

I also sometimes use red curry paste, fresh peppercorns.

I will give you some examples…

If I stir fry liver I use shredded lime leaves, fish sauce, red curry paste and fresh Lime juice often I just squeeze the lime and chuck in the rind and remove before serving.

If stir-frying meat I would use garlic, birds eye chillies, oyster sauce, mushroom soy, a tiny amount of black soy and a couple of shakes of Maggi or green Mountain seasoning and a little water.

Plus any vegetables like snake beans which come in green or red, kale, broccoli, wing beans…

 

If making a vegetable stir fry then I would use shallots or onions, green onions, maybe bell peppers or I sometimes add some noodles plus the sauces…

Stir-fried Morning Glory or Pad Pak Boon Fai Daeng is also known as water spinach…It is a very popular vegetable dish in Thailand and one I have for breakfast/brunch quite often with rice.
This is a very quick dish to cook once you have all your ingredients prepared..5 mins at the most.
Ingredients:

  • 1 bunch of Morning Glory
  • 4-6 cloves of garlic
  • 3 or more Thai Chillies
  • 2 tbsp of Oyster Sauce
  • 1 tbsp of Thai Fish Sauce
  • 1 tbsp of fermented soybean paste or oil with soya beans ( optional)
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 1/2 to 1 tbsp of oil
  • 1/4 cup fresh veg or pork stock


Let’s Cook!

Wash and cut your morning-glory into 4-6 inch pieces.
Bash the chillies and garlic in a pestle and mortar
Heat the oil in a pan until very hot.
Add the garlic and chillies and stir-fry ( stirring) for 15-20 seconds be careful not to let the garlic burn.


Add morning-glory and all other ingredients except for the vegetable stock.
Stir-fry for 40 seconds and add vegetable stock and stir-fry for another 10 seconds.
Serve with steamed rice or as a side dish.
Enjoy!

This stir fry was just made up as Aston wanted pork with peppercorns…

smart

STIR-FRIED pORK WITH pEPPERCORNS AND WING BEANS.

To make I just thinly sliced pork loin but you could use fillet of pork or chicken, A small amount of red curry paste which I cooked in a tiny bit of oil and with some shredded lime leaves and a shake of fish sauce. I then added a little coconut milk to make a little sauce added some chopped garlic and then my pork… cooked on high for a few minutes until the meat was cooked…sliced thinly and cooked high this cut cooks very quickly then added a couple strands of fresh peppercorns, chopped a snake bean and a couple of lovely wing beans cook for about 1-2 mins as we like our veg crisp. Taste and adjust seasoning but if you taste all through the cooking it should be fine..serve with rice or noddles…Enjoy!

If I am using Thai basil or holy basil the I cook my meat with oyster sauce, soy and black soy instead of the curry paste and then I wouldn’t use fish sauce.I only use fish sauce when I use curry paste.

This link is for the recipe with Thai basil but using minced pork and will give you the measurements but once or if you make as many stir-fries as I do then it becomes second nature and I just use my wooden spoon or with the Maggi seasoning just a few shakes and taste…https://carolcooks2.com/2018/08/25/krapow-grapow-moo-pork-with-basil/

cauliflower-rice-pork-thai basil-recipe

If Thais use Grapow Moo or holy basil they add an egg and if it is sweet basil called horapa in Thai ..no egg.

Don’t forget you can use fish cut up small or prawns or noodles…Yellow noodles are lovely with chicken and a few veggies or just without the chicken and some veggies…Almost anything goes with a stir fry…

I hope this has helped demystify a stir fry as many people I know just don’t like making them and steer clear just use your instincts and taste…As for measurement a handful of this and that depending on how many you are cooking for it will get easier any questions I am happy to help…

About Carol Taylor:

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and well being.

The environment is also something I am passionate about and there will be more on this on my blog this year

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…Then, I will be happy!

Please stay safe and well and follow your governments safety guidelines remember we are all in this together xxx

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Food Column – Carol Taylor – A – Z of Food – ‘J’ for Jelly Beans, Jalapenos, Jack Fruit and Jerky all with a little Jus

Time for the letter J…I am enjoying reading it again myself for the second time. Many thanks to the lovely Sally for rerunning this series…I hope you all enjoy the Letter J….From Jelly Beans to Jalapenos and Jackfruit….xxx

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

Welcome to the series from Carol Taylor, the wonderful A – Z of Food and I am looking forward to expanding my knowledge of wonderful ingredients across the food groups, spices and herbs over the year.

This week in the A-Z of food it is the letter J

I hope you are enjoying this series of the A-z of food as much as I have the research and writing.

Starting with one of my favourite little sweeties the Jelly Bean…

Jelly Beans are primarily made of sugar with a jelly inside a candy shell…There are some awesome flavours…Tabasco Flavour, Chilli Mango, Marguerita and some beautiful fruity flavours…Cringe-worthy flavours like Earthworm, Earwax and vomit are for me a No No! But I suppose for Halloween revellers they will be on someone’s list…

Jelly:

Depending on where in the world you live Jelly can be a wibbly wobbly fruit jelly made with…

View original post 1,719 more words

Thailand… Travel and Tradition… Handmade Thai pancakes..Khao Gle-at.

Today I will be taking you to the village where many old traditions are still observed and passed down the generations …Much is still hand made using homemade implements and utensils.

Making these pancakes the traditional way is still done in the Thai villages and I am very lucky to be able to witness these traditions which are passed down through the generations. The working of the wooden presses is a sight to behold again these are family heirlooms and passed down.

Also, it is something which all the family participates in and learn how to make, the oldest passes on her knowledge and the young ones start at the bottom and learn but if you look at the smiling faces everyone is enjoying it. There is a real feeling of family and community in the villages…Thais also look down on anyone who does not care for the elderly my daughter in law carries on most alarmingly if she sees an old person begging on the streets…I am sure she puts a hex on their absent families…

coconut mix

If you look closely when the old lady is pounding the flesh from the coconuts the children are working it by jumping up and down at the opposite end it is just like a see-saw and as much fun.

pounding the coconut

These pancakes are made from the flesh of the older coconuts and mixed with palm sugar, sticky rice which is ground into a flour and sesame seeds. There are many variations on this some are mixed with eggs.

Once the mixture is made it is shaped into pancake shapes with a wooden press. See below.

Flattening the pancake mix

Pancakes drying

They are then left to dry for about 3 days and then toasted over the open flames of a Thai BBQ rotated by hand between two wooden fans like paddles to ensure even cooking.

It is fascinating to watch and you can both see and feel the unity when cooking…I am sure that little lad in the final image is wondering when they will be ready to eat…

I have seen these sold on the roadsides and now know how they are made in the homes. It certainly is a family affair as from the youngest to the oldest they all have a part to play.

I hope you enjoyed this little visit into these Thai families homes….It is just one of many which I hope to share with you…x

About Carol Taylor:

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and wellbeing.

The environment is also something I am passionate about and there will be more on this on my blog this year

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…….Then, I will be happy!

More and more of my blogging friends have joined me on MeWe…A social media site which is fairly new and which promises much without the restrictions some other social media sites are choosing to impose on many of us…Join me if you will on  mewe.com/i/caroltaylor3 

Carol is a contributor to the Phuket Island Writers Anthology: https://www.amazon.com/Phuket-Island-Writers-Anthology-Stories-ebook/dp/B00RU5IYNS

Connect to Carol

Blog: https://carolcooks2.com/
Twitterhttps://twitter.com/TheRealCarolT
Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/carol.taylor.1422

Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/caroltaylor56/pins/

Thank you once again for reading this post I hope you all have a creative week ahead xx

I am off to Bangkok for the weekend and I am sure I will try some awesome street food so to get your tastebuds zinging I have reposted an older post …Enjoy

Thai Street Food

via Travel Thailand… Street Food and Markets…

Thank you so much for reading this post If you have any thoughts please add a comment I always respond xxx

About Carol Taylor:

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and wellbeing.

The environment is also something I am passionate about and there will be more on this on my blog this year

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…….Then, I will be happy!

More and more of my blogging friends have joined me on MeWe…A social media site which is fairly new and which promises much without the restrictions some other social media sites are choosing to impose on many of us…Join me if you will on  mewe.com/i/caroltaylor3 

 

Carol is a contributor to the Phuket Island Writers Anthology: https://www.amazon.com/Phuket-Island-Writers-Anthology-Stories-ebook/dp/B00RU5IYNS

Connect to Carol

Blog: https://carolcooks2.com/
Twitterhttps://twitter.com/TheRealCarolT
Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/carol.taylor.1422

Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/caroltaylor56/pins/

Thank you once again for reading this post I hope you all have a great weekend xx

Horapa Moo….Pork and Sweet Basil

Pork and Basil……..recipe as promised.

Ingredients:

For 1 serving.

  • 100 gm pork loin sliced finely
  • 2/3 birds eye chillies. cut in small slices.
  • 2/3 cloves garlic finely sliced.

 

  • SAM_6054
  • 2 long beans( snake beans) chopped in small pieces.
  • 2 stems Thai Sweet Basil called Horapa in Thai
  • 1 tbsp Oyster Sauce.
  • Shake or 2 of Maggi ( seasoning sauce)
  • 1/2 tsp black soy.

Let’s Cook!

Put a tiny bit oil in a small frying pan.

Add Oyster Sauce, Maggi and Black Soy stir to combine.

Add chillies and garlic and cook for  1 minute then add your finely sliced pork loin-stirring until cooked about 2- 3 mins. Add Green Beans and Thai Holy Basil cook for further 2 mins.

In the picture, I have served it with cauliflower rice but I also serve with steamed rice it depends just how I feel…

Enjoy!

This is one of my favourite dishes…Holy basil is also used when making Thai Green Curry and also Thai pork salad… Called Larb here……Holy basil is truly a  lovely herb…

I hope you enjoy recipes which are all tried, tested and authentic….

Until next time stay safe, have fun and laugh a lot…..