Category Archives: Thai Fruits

Fruity Friday..how does my garden grow…Chocolate Habaneros…

There are no silver bells and cockles shells…but I have seedlings… my garden is growing…welcome to an update…

Having found a new market place I am filling my garden with some unusual plants and fruits…from seeds to seedlings all is well…if only I didn’t have to share my seedling with the birds…sigh…if I didn’t feed them I could understand…

Hubby had a good idea to try and thwart the little darlings…  my seeds and tiny seedlings I have transferred to my second kitchen…most Thai houses like mine have them… a sort of enclosed but open-air kitchen if that makes sense…A gas hob which is great for Thai stir-fries and my second oven but there is still lots of room for my seedings it is warm and humid and the birds can’t feast on my seedlings… they are out of the sun it’s like a greenhouse…

This purple mango is so beautiful I know I have a few years to wait for the fruit but it will be worth it…

One of the beautiful purple mango trees now has its permanent spot… I am still deciding on where to put the other one but for now, it is in my plant nursery…the brightly coloured little rainbow treasure chilli seeds which I planted in the eggshells last week have just started to peek their heads through the soil… one yesterday and another 4 today …

I can’t wait for these to start fruiting I wonder how hot they will be but they also look so pretty…

Our Chocolate Habanero chilli plant arrived yesterday smaller than I hoped but strong and with lots of little offshoots…

The Chocolate habanero is from Jamaica. It is also known as “Congo Black” or “Brown Scotch Bonnet”. The plant grows to about 1 metre in a pot and would probably grow bigger in the ground. … This is one of the hottest Habaneros measuring over 400.000 SHUs units.

The long pepper has now been staked and is climbing there are also quite a few little long peppers appearing…

The purple melon is a little sturdy seedling but growing well a few months and they should be well established…Pepino melons like most purple fruits and vegetables are a good source of beta-carotene, vitamin C, and potassium, and are rich in dietary fibre.

Again I eagerly await the fruit as it is supposed to be very nice…I have decided my first dish will be a nice salsa…

The white Taiwanese Bitter gourd has been planted, so they will start appearing within the next 7-10 days…fingers crossed…

taiwanese white papaya

These are stunning looking fruit and I can’t wait for them to start growing I am also hoping they fruit quite quickly as most gourds do, unlike the mango which takes about 5 years to fruit. I am struggling to find very much information about this beautiful white gourd…

The coriander and grapow (Holy Basil) are growing well…

Today I will be planting some more Horapa seeds, a Thai sweet Basil…both these basils are true annuals which mean it has to be replanted each year…

Thai - Basil- horapa

I have discovered a Clove Basil which is a new one for me…hopefully, I can get some seeds or seedlings…

Clove Basil has much larger leaves than regular basil and is nicknamed “tree basil” the plant can reach 3 metres tall hence its name. It is an aromatic perennial herb the oils in the leaves give off an intense clove aroma with the occasional notes of thyme. Mature plants develop edible, white flowers that have a slightly feathery appearance and are bitter compared to the sweet and spicy leaves.

Thank you for reading this post if you have tips on growing any of these or you have grown any of these plants and fruits please leave a comment I love to chat and any tips are gratefully received…Carol x

 

 

 

 

 

The Culinary Alphabet with a twist…The letter G ( nutmeG)

Good morning everyone and Pete… time for another post which is this crazy idea from one of my fellow scribes …but food fun…

G is not quite another doozy…  more processes but still culinary processes with a few foods thrown in…

 

Butterflying:

pork loin gruyere cheese onions

To butterfly in cooking terms is to cut a piece of meat, fish or poultry nearly in half and flatten it out…Prawns are often butterflied when being prepared for the BBQ…A leg of lamb butterflied and stuffed then rolled is a wonderful thing as is this loin of Pork...All you need is a sharp knife and the know how…click the link above and I will show you how easy it is to do…

Charbroiling:

Charbroiler grilling is defined as “the process used when an item is cooked on a grated surface to sear in the flavours and impart a degree of charring which gives the product a light charcoal smoke flavour.” Charbroiling will expose food to temperatures often in excess of 260 °C (500 °F).

Egg:

Comes from a chook/duck/goose/quail/turkey, ants or fish…Caviar being one of the most expensive of eggs…The most expensive of all caviar, and indeed the world’s most expensive food is ‘Almas’, from the Iranian Beluga fish – 1 kg (2 lb 3 oz) of this ‘black gold’ is regularly sold for £20,000 (then $34,500). Almas is produced from the eggs of a rare albino sturgeon between 60-100 years old, which swims in the southern Caspian Sea where there is apparently less pollution.

Caviar is traditionally eaten directly from the skin between the index finger and the thumb. The eggs are rolled slowly around the mouth and pop to release the flavour.

Ant eggs are a popular food here and can be found on most market stalls and indeed make a lovely salad or are good in a soup…But if you want to know the weirdest of eggs to eat think shark egg, penguin, Emu, Turtle, Snail eggs…and of course the most expensive chocolate egg comes from Choccywoccydoodah – €31,000. When it comes to luxury Belgian chocolate, look no further than British-based chocolaterie, Choccywoccydoodah. …Hows that for an Easter Egg?

Etrog:

Is the yellow citron or Citrus medica used by Jews during the week-long holiday of Sukkot as one of the four species. The Etrog (citron fruit), Lulav (frond of date palm) Hadass (myrtle bough) and Aravah (willow branch) – are the four species the Jewish people are commanded to bind together and wave in the sukkah, a temporary booth constructed for use during the week-long festival of Sukkot.

Fig:

There is nothing quite like a beautiful fresh fig...one of my favourite things …

Glug:

Is a hollow gurgling sound or series of sounds as of liquid being poured from a bottle. i.e some recipes call for a glug of Olive oil…it is a word I am quite familiar with as my mother used to refer to a glug of oil or wine…is a British thing I ask…so many of my American friends have queried my use of the word.

Gochujang:

My new favourite chilli paste…it is a Korean hot pepper chilli paste…used for marinades, added to dipping sauces or your soups and stews if you want to spice things up a little…

Goreng:

A Malaysian word which is applied to noodles or rice which are fried with meat, fish or vegetables as in Nasi Goreng a popular Malaysian fried rice dish often served for breakfast.

Homogenising:

Is process milk goes through where fat is emulsified thus the cream then does not separate. As a child, a treat was the gold-topped milk which had a layer of cream…it comes from Jersey or Guernsey and although pasteurised it is not homogenised…One of my childhood memories…

Icing:

Icing, or frosting, is a sweet, often creamy glaze made of sugar with a liquid, such as water or milk, that is often enriched with ingredients like butter, egg whites, cream cheese, or flavourings. It is used to coat or decorate baked goods, such as cakes.

Jug:

To “jug” is to stew or boil a hare or a rabbit in an earthenware jug or a jar…an old fashioned method of cooking before we had slow cookers and the like.

Maprang:

Or Marian plum is a lovely golden plum grown here in Thailand…

Maprang fruit is a smallish lemon colour fruit…This lovely fruit has a very short season and is likened to the mango but the taste is nothing like a mango…Also called the Marian Plum by some this small, oval-shaped fruit, small enough to fit wholly within the palm of your hand, is green when young, but will turn a deep yellow-orange when ripe.

Many Thais prefer to eat this fruit before it is fully ripened…a cross between mango and plum, with just a hint of sour flavour on the surface right under the skin which gives way to a sweet fruit beneath.  It’s a lovely combination of sweet and sour, which many look forward to eating each year! In fact, the entire fruit is edible, from the skin to seed, however, the seed is quite bitter, so not many will eat them.  The leaves are used in salads or cooked.

Due to its short season, it is one of the more expensive fruits here ..it is high in Vitamin C, fibre and has quite a high water content…I like this fruit very much.

Nutmeg:

Originating from the dark-leaved evergreen Myristica fragrans tree in Indonesia, the seed is now grown and used globally, mostly for cooking but sometimes as a narcotic. However, for the purposes of getting high, nutmeg is not a commonly used substance.

One of my favourite spices which is great as a topping for rice pudding or an egg custard tart…

Nog:

Any beverage made with beaten eggs usually mixed with alcoholic liqueur…Egg Nog is a good example especially popular during the cold months of the year. There is nothing like a good glass of egg nog topped with a sprinkling of nutmeg I have lovely memories of my nana making egg nog and letting me have sneaky sip…

That’s all for this week see you in two weeks for the letter H (noocH)…

Please stay safe as it seems in some places lockdowns are being introduced again…not good xx

About Carol Taylor:

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and well being.

The environment is also something I am passionate about and there will be more on this on my blog this year

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…Then, I will be happy!

Please stay safe and well and follow your governments safety guidelines remember we are all in this together xxx

 

Fruity Friday…Monk Fruit

Welcome to Fruity Friday’s...This week it is the Monk Fruit.

It grows here in Northern Thailand as well as in Southern China…Because it doesn’t keep well once picked or look particularly appealing it is very very rarely found in the markets and is used to make sweeteners…Its name derives from the fact it was used by monks way back in the 13th century…it is also known by the name of Luo Han Guo or “Buddha fruit…

The fruit extract is obtained by boiling the fresh fruit in hot water then drying afterwards this creates a powdered extract…

Monk Fruit sweetener or extract has been around for decades however now it is more readily available as it is becoming very popular among the diet conscious, vegans and anyone following the Keto Diet…In fact, I came across it as a sweetener when looking for a recipe only just a few weeks ago…

 

This fruit has been used for centuries in traditional Chinese medicine, but the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) didn’t approve its use as a sweetener until 2010.

Although like any product until extensive testing over a period of years has been done then the long term effects on human health are not known…however, because tests so far on mice at far higher doses than humans would take it is deemed to be safe for human consumption.

During processing, mogrosides are separated from the fresh-pressed juice. Therefore, monk fruit sweetener does not contain fructose or glucose.

Because this extract is maybe 100–250 times sweeter than table sugar, many manufacturers mix monk fruit sweetener with other natural products, such as inulin or erythritol, to reduce the intensity of the sweetness.

Different from most nonnutritive sweeteners which can cause side effects like bloating, gas or even allergic reactions monk fruit has no known side effects.

Some earlier studies show that monk fruit has been used in Traditional Chinese Medicines for centuries to make hot drinks for the relief of sore throats and reduce phlegm…it is the fruits mogrocides which are said to have anti-inflammatory properties and help keep sugar levels stable…

Based on some studies conducted on animal diabetes models is why it is being hailed as a power food for diabetes…

Hard to find fresh monk fruit...I am still searching and have my daughter law on the case at her local markets it is difficult to find fresh monk fruit unless you are in the regions where it is grown, It can, however, be found dried in some Asian stores.

I don’t use sweeteners but some say it does not have the bitter after taste of other sweeteners which does seem to be causing the upsurge in its popularity…however because to grow, harvest and dry this fruit is not an easy task plus the added import costs means this product is rarer to find and more expensive than other sweeteners and often there are fewer options available on the shelves.

During my research, I have discovered that Amazon sells it as do other speciality and wholefood grocers…

Have you enjoyed your read? If so let me know in comments I do love to hear from you it makes
my day…xx

About Carol Taylor: 

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and wellbeing.

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…….Then, I will be happy!

Thank you once again for reading this post I hope you all have a fabulous weekend and stay safe… these are troubling times and I know many of you are back on lockdown again I just wish everyone would observe the guidelines and then maybe this will all be over far quicker than if we don’t xx

CarolCooks2…weekly roundup 3rd May-9th May 2020…Recipes and Mothers Day…

Good Morning and welcome it’s time for my weekly roundup of posts…Like everyone else, I am getting used to being cocooned in my home and garden with just the occasional quick trip out for essentials…Cooking has always been a passion but not like this…There are not really abnormal shortages of food here but I am not popping out every day or at will…Shopping is planned and the storecupboard and those tins/packets at the back of it are seeing the light of day…

I have also had my fair share of disasters …maybe its because I am cooking more or maybe it’s the heat and humidity and my temperamental oven although I learnt something the other day thanks to my eagle-eyed son…The temp gauge read spot on for my cake…Because my oven heat comes from the bottom like most ovens here I have to double tin anyone who is used to ovens in Asia knows exactly what I mean…

Cake in the oven and the temp gauge shot up…the only solution we came up with was that as the heat was directly under the tin that caused the heat/temp to rise…Any other thoughts on that.?.. The way forward seems to be to put my tin in the oven while it is heating thus getting a more accurate reading and then putting my cake tin in…Thoughts?

Cake making here is not for the faint-hearted…

Monday: Recycling and Climate Change…4th May 2020…and Covid-19…

A new month already nearly half a year gone…A few months of sadness and grief for many but for all of us unprecedented times and restrictions which many of us haven’t experienced in our lifetimes…All of this is having an effect on climate change, air pollution, waste, recycling…

corona-4971013_640

I wonder what 2021 will bring will it bring changes for the good or will it instead of starting a new norm just go back to how it was?

https://carolcooks2.com/2020/05/04/recycling-and-climate-change4th-may-2020and-covid-19/

Tuesday: Exotic Spicy Thai Food…Ant Egg Salad…Koi Khai Mod Dang

National Egg Month which meant we will talk eggs with a difference…Spicy Ant Egg Salad…something the Mexican call caviar on land…Many of you may not have heard or tried it…some of you may have tried it or decided it wasn’t for you…Opinion is most certainly divided…

macro photography of ant

Photo by Jimmy Chan on Pexels.com

Personally, I love it!…

https://carolcooks2.com/2020/05/05/exotic-spicy-thai-food-ant-egg-salad-koi-khai-mod-dang/

Wednesday: Whimsical Wednesday with CarolCooks2…

Hello and welcome… I would like to say that here on Whimsical Wednesdays it is a Corona free zone but this sneaky virus has crept into every single aspect of our lives…Awake or asleep it is there…It dominates the headlines and our thoughts…It invokes great sadness but also great joy…and a smidgen of hope…Nope, I refuse to mention the other 10%…My focus is coming out the other side with hope in my heart…

We are in unprecedented times…Captain Tom who has now been made an Honorary Colonel cheered me up and made my day…Here is a clip of his memories…

https://carolcooks2.com/2020/05/06/whimsical-wednesday-with-carolcooks2-6/

Thursday: Smorgasbord Health Column – Food Therapy – #Asparagus – Nutrient-Packed and Delicious by Sally Cronin…Plus a bonus of some Asparagus recipes from me…Who doesn’t love asparagus wrapped in bacon???

 

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2020/05/07/smorgasbord-health-column-food-therapy-asparagus-nutrient-packed-and-delicious-by-sally-cronin/

Thursday was also National Roast Leg of Lamb Day…

I also shared our favourite Egyptian Flat Bread made with leftover lamb and some hummus…

Ehyptian-lamb-flatbreads

The plating was done by Aston who then duly tucked in… he loves his food…I don’t think I have ever seen a child who eats with such joy on his face…

https://carolcooks2.com/2020/05/07/national-roast-leg-of-lamb-day/

Friday: Nought to write…

I came to a standstill…I started writing and then realised it was Saturday post I was writing…Doh!…my days have merged into one…the heat has gotten in and I had nothing to write…Every time I tried to do some research something on Covid-19 popped up it was also the day after my brother in laws funeral…I was sad, dispirited and just didn’t know what to write so I had a drink or two, ate some crisps and all the things I wouldn’t normally eat, cursed my oven and gave up…Not like me at all but I have this little niggle which is getting bigger…I also thought if I feel like this how the heck must someone feel if they are on their own …made me realise how selfish I was being…

sundowners maxiko-2684386_640

Image by heidi_ziller from Pixabay

I thought how old I was…next year…So I started to plan a party…I intend to celebrate that milestone in style …We are going to Koh Samui and anyone who would like to join us is most welcome…

Saturday: Exotic Thai Fruits…Matum Fruit, Thai Cherries, Gac Fruit and Mangosteen…

Some of my favourite fruits… I particularly love the Thai cherries pickled…I am partial to a pickle or two…

https://carolcooks2.com/2020/05/09/exotic-thai-fruits-matum-fruit-thai-cherries-gac-fruit-and-mangosteen/

That’s all for this week…I hope you have enjoyed this weekly roundup xx  

I invite your comments…Let’s chat!

About Carol Taylor: 

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and wellbeing.

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…….Then, I will be happy!

Thank you once again for reading this post I hope you all are having a great weekend, stay safe and wash those hands xx

Exotic Thai Fruits…Matum Fruit, Thai Cherries, Gac Fruit and Mangosteen…

I am missing my Saturday morning excursion to the market so today I am going to post about fruit which is common or uncommon to find where we live here in Thailand…..

Gac fruit is not a common fruit and quite a treat when it is found on the local markets in Southern Thailand or grown on land and in gardens as are many of the less commercial fruits.

Gac fruit

With its prickly outer shell which is NOT edible this fruit grows on climbing vines. Going from green to a dark orange when it is ripe this fruit has a short season of only 2 months from December to January. It is quite a rare fruit it can be found on local markets in Southern Thailand. It is the soft pulp surrounding the edible seeds which you eat. The seeds are not only edible but used in traditional Chinese medicines.

It is used to treat eye conditions, burns, skin problems and wounds.

The juice makes a healthy drink which is said to be good for the eyes, immunity, skin and heart health. The taste is a cross between a tomato and a ripe papaya it is also commonly called the Gac fruit. Its other names are  Chanbada Fruit or spiny bitter gourd.

Today the Gac fruit extracts are used in very popular skin care supplements around the world. Rich in antioxidants and beta-carotene it is said to contain 70 times more than in tomatoes or zeaxanthin.

It has the highest concentration of beta-carotene than any other known fruit or vegetable as much as 10 times more than the carrot.

Once in the body, it converts to Vitamin A and is said to have a variety of protective properties.

Due to the fruits magnificent orange hue, it is often grown as an ornamental plant.

It is also used to make a delicious deep fried sweet cooked in coconut batter. You will only find this sweet in the south of Thailand as the fruit is quite rare which also makes it expensive. It also tends to be found in local gardens and not really grown commercially.

Its brilliant orange colour is very attractive and it is also cooked in  Khao Soi( Sticky Rice) flavoured with cinnamon and served at New Year Celebrations and weddings.

Gac fruit

Image Credit: James Morris a friend who has given me a free licence to use this picture.

Thank you, James 🙂

The next fruit is:-

The Matum fruit which has a very hard shell and you wouldn’t want one dropped on your head from a great height.

It comes from a gum bearing mid-sized subtropical fruit tree. It has many other names such as golden apple, Indian quince, and holy fruit. It is said to have many medicinal benefits.

matum tree

The fruits medicinal purposes are very high when the fruit has just ripened. It has a high tannin content which makes it suitable for the treatment of cholera and dysentery.

A hot poultice of the fruit leaves are said to be an effective treatment for various inflammations, a leaf decoction is also used as an aid for asthma. The root, leaves, and bark are also effective when used on a snakebite.

More often than not the fruit is sliced, dried and a thirst quenching tea can be made by steeping the dried slices in hot water, it is a very popular drink in Thailand.

The fragrant flesh is also eaten with Keow Neow…sticky rice. The young leaves and shoots are eaten as a vegetable here in Thailand and used to season food in Indonesia.

It is also a prototype of today’s Orange.

matum tree

Images: My own.

The Mangosteen Garcinia Mangostana has a very hard outer shell and is a widely eaten and available fruit here in Thailand.

When open it is similar with its segments to an Orange. It has a thick outer skin which is about 1/4 of an inch thick. If picked straight from the tree it is easier to open because as the fruit ages it dries and loses water thus the outer shell quickly hardens.

Keeping it in a bag in the fridge slows down the moisture loss.

It grows naturally in South East Asia and is known for its sweet peachy tasting flesh. Its seeds are bitter and should not be eaten.

When young ..freshly picked from the tree the seeds are white but turn brown as the fruit ages so it is a good indication of how fresh your Mangosteen is.

To open the fruit using a thin sharp serrated knife carefully cut around the circumference of the fruit. Then twist to open.

mangosteen-showing cut fruit half

Warning: Be very careful not to cut yourself as the shell is very hard which may cause the knife to slip.

Low in calories and high in fibre with a high Potassium content the Mangosteen also has healthy amounts of manganese and magnesium which is good for intestinal health.

It is known as one of the 5 not so typical fruits noted for its life-changing potential. Scientists believe that an antioxidant in Mangosteen can cause cell death in cancer.

But as with everything we consume moderation is key. Its high fructose levels can be harmful to humans.

Thai-style Mangosteen Clafoutis recipe:

  • 5 fresh Mangosteen opened and segmented( leave seeds in)
  • 1/2 cup sugar plus 1 tbsp.
  • 1 tsp cornstarch
  • 1/3 cup rice flour ( all purpose flour) can be used.
  • 4 large eggs
  • 1 cup coconut milk.
  • Pinch salt
  • 1 tsp grated lime/lemon zest.
  • 1tsp of vanilla and coconut essences.
  • Icing sugar to finish when serving.

Let’s Cook!

Pre-heat oven to 350F.generously grease a 1 1/2 qt casserole dish or you can use individual ramekins.

Prepare Mangosteen by removing from the outer shell and dividing into segments(leave the stone in)

Toss the fruit with 1 tsp cornflour and 1 tbsp of sugar. Arrange the fruit in the bottom of the dish/dishes.

In a large bowl or food processor whisk eggs with salt and sugar. Then whisk in flour. Add coconut milk, lime zest, vanilla and coconut essences and whisk to blend together.

Pour the mixture into the prepared dish/dishes, the fruit may float but that ok.

Place dish in the oven, if using ramekins they need to be placed in a tin/dish containing water which goes 1/3 way up the Ramekins.

Bake for 55-60 minutes until the middles are set and the top is lightly browned.

Serve warm with a light dusting of icing sugar with ice cream or whipped cream.

Warning: Advise guests to be aware that there are stones in the fruit.

Enjoy!

Thai Cherry and pickled Thai cherries 

thai cherries 1

The Thai cherry or mountain cherries as they are also called are found in East Asia, South Asia and South East Asia. They are from the family Rosaceae and the genus Prunus.

To me, they also look very much like a tomato but there the resemblance ends

The name in Thai is naang pha yaa suea khrong which translated means Tiger Queen. It sounds so pretty, doesn’t it?… I love some of the Thai translations.

Trees flower in autumn and winter and produce a yellow fruit which turns red as it ripens.

The fruit can be eaten raw or cooked as can the seed of the cherry.

This recipe is for pickled cherries. 

  • 6 cups of pitted and washed cherries.
  • 1 lime
  • 2 stalks of lemongrass crushed
  • 4 pieces of dried ginger( galangal)
  • 10 dried birds eye chillies
  • 2 cups of  white vinegar
  • 1/2 cup of sugar
  • 1/4 cup of rice vinegar.

Either one large mason jar which holds 4 cups or 2 smaller jars sterilised.

Zest your lime and add to a mason jar with lemongrass, ginger and chillies.

Put both kinds of vinegar, sugar and juice of the lime into a pan and on a medium heat, stir until the sugar has dissolved when the vinegar is warm add the cherries and cook for 4 minutes.

With a slotted spoon put the cherries into the jar, then strain the vinegar and pour over the cherries any remaining vinegar put in a clean bottle and use for salad dressings or marinades.

Seal the jar and leave for 4-6 weeks to allow the flavours to develop.

Enjoy!

Further information on the uses of the bark and leaves.

Gum is obtained from the bark and chewed also the juice from the bark if applied externally to the back is said to give some relief from the pain of a backache.

Both the fruit and leaves also produce a green dye.

The seeds are used in the production of necklaces by the ethnic tribes in Northern Thailand.

This tree has hard, strong aromatic wood which is glossy and the branches are used for walking sticks.

A little warning: 

This fruit belongs to a genus where most if not all its members produce hydrogen cyanide which is a poison which gives an almond taste to their characteristic flavour.

The toxin which is found mainly in the leaves and the seeds is easily detected by its bitter taste. The quantity is too small to do any harm but a very bitter seed or fruit should not be eaten.

On the plus side in small quantities, it has been proved to stimulate respiration and improve digestion. It is also claimed to be of benefit in the treatment of cancer.

Which brings me to what I always say ..moderation is key and as always  I can’t say it enough ” check” what you are eating before you eat it if it is unknown and you have just picked it because it looks pretty and because you have heard you can use other flowers. Not all flowers are edible.

Please always check and stay safe.

I hope you have enjoyed hearing about some of the fruits which we have here in Thailand if you have and you think any of your friends would love to read about them then please share on your favourite social media or to Pinterest.

That’s all for today…Please be well and stay safe…xxx

About Carol Taylor: Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and wellbeing.

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…….Then, I will be happy!

Thank you once again for reading this post I hope you all have a fabulous week and stay safe these are troubling times xx

 

 

 

 

.

 

 

This week in my kitchen…Cempedak Fruit…Crispy Belly Pork and more…

I have done more eating than cooking this last week as I have been away for a few days my daughter came over for a visit it was lovely… lots of yummy street food and I discovered a few new fruits and curries to add to my recipes…

One such fruit was the Cempedak fruit in the Thai language called Champada (จำปา [th] ) which is a relative of the Jackfruit and often called the ugly cousin as when it is ripe the skin goes from green to a muddy brown colour. It is not however as big as the jackfruit it is more the size of a rugby ball, cylinder in shape with a slightly squished in the centre.

Thai Cempedak Fruit

Photo credit: anwarsiak***sibuk*** on Visualhunt / CC BY

Highly aromatic when ripe with the taste being a mix of banana and pineapple it is lovely eaten fresh or as we discovered very nice lightly battered and deep-fried…I do love the Thai batter as they use mainly rice flour which makes for a lovely crispy batter not at all stogy like flour-based batters can be. Unfortunately, I don’t have an image of that as they were so very nice they were eaten before I could take a picture…Very yummy they was.

It has quite a large seed which can be boiled and eaten like a small potato.

The tree bark is used as a yellow dye to colour the monk’s robes.

The fruit is rich in Vitamin A & C plus heteriflavon C which is used to eliminate the cause of Malaria parasite. With a high water content, it is also rich in enzymes, bioflavonoid, ascorbic acid and rich in minerals and vitamins.

An around healthy fruit which although found predominately in the south of Thailand I am hoping I can find some here in the North.

I came home to a nice Thai Green Curry cooked by my son…

Green Curry is always a family favourite here a flavoursome curry with mushrooms and eggplants.

My Kombucha scoby is growing well so I think by now I can transfer the scoby to my big jar and start production in earnest…I love Kombucha it has lots of health benefits as well as being delicious to drink. I really don’t like drinking anything distasteful for my health unless I really have to…

Crispy Pork and kale…or Kanoo Moo Krob as it is called in Thai…Is a family favourite…Pork Belly is a favourite with the Thais and sold on nearly every street corner, either chopped and eaten with a spicy chilli dip and sticky rice or added to a stir fry ( as below) or other stir-fries with Thai Basil which is also very nice.

Ingredients:

  • 2 Belly Pork Strips.
  • 8 Large leaves of Kale.
  • 3/4 cloves Garlic. squashed with the flat blade of a knife.
  • 2/3 birds eye chillies.
  • 2 tbsp Oyster Sauce
  • 1 tbsp Soy Sauce
  • 2/3 shakes of Maggi Sauce.
  • Half tbsp. Oil.

Let’s Cook!

Cook Belly Pork in the oven until tender and crispy. For about 40 mins depending on your oven.

I normally cook on about 180/200 degrees to start and then reduce heat slightly to160 degrees. When the pork is tender turn up the heat to crisp the pork. When nice and crispy remove the pork from the oven and chop into bite pieces.

crispy belly slices

Heat the wok or large frypan and add half tablespoon oil.

Add crushed garlic and chillies, add little hot water and cook for 1 min…at this point the chillies may overpower you..ha ha….turn on expel fan and add chopped kale.

Stems first if using as they take longer to cook. I use stems of Kale also if they are quite thick slice into 2-inch pieces.

crispy pork and kale

Cook for 2 mins and add remainder of Kale leaves and turn over a few times ….I use fish slice as I find it easier to just turn kale over.

Add 2 tbsp Oyster Sauce and 1 tbsp Soy along with few shakes of Maggi ( seasoning sauce). Taste and adjust if necessary. Cook for further 2/3 mins.

Add crispy Pork turn or stir a few times to mix.

Kanom Moo Krob Thai crispy pork and kale

Check the seasoning again and serve with steamed rice.

Enjoy!

That’s all for this week there will be more recipes next week and don’t forget I am over @Sally’s on Wednesday with lots of yummy recipes see you there…

Just in case you missed the previous post on my Cookery Column @ Sallys it is all on the link…Bread rolls, pickles and much more just right for those summer BBQ’S

Thank you for reading and enjoy the recipes xx

About Carol:

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use have to improve our health and wellbeing.

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…….Then, I will be happy!

Carol is a contributor to the Phuket Island Writers Anthology: https://www.amazon.com/Phuket-Island-Writers-Anthology-Stories-ebook/dp/B00RU5IYNS

Connect to Carol( Moi)

Blog: https://blondieaka.wordpress.com/

Twitterhttps://twitter.com/TheRealCarolT

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/carol.taylor.1422

Pinterest:  https://www.pinterest.com/caroltaylor56/pins/

Thank you once again for reading this post and if you love it please feel free to share or bookmark for later…If you have any queries then drop me an email carolcookstwo@gmail.com …..xx

 

Zepiskye homemade

Blogs recepies, crafts, photography,hobby's

Uff Health Goals, Pulling up your perfect size...

Find recipes all within 2tbsp of fat and let Cravings meet Health! JOIN the most unique troop today!

Health and Life Matters_Momsotherside

Health, Food, Family, Travels, Something to note

Sowmya's Spicy Corner

Authentic Vegetarian Recipes

Mimi At 15b

Allotment | Food | Lifestyle | Sustainability |Travel

The Humble Avocado

A lifestyle blog based on all things natural and plant-based whilst looking after the pennies. 'Be the change you wish to see in the world.' Be The Humble Avocado.

Pesky Recipes

Delicious pescatarian, vegetarian and vegan recipes

Just Keep Swimming

memoir that matters

Platform Number 4

Becky Ross Michael: an author's blog

priorhouse blog

Photos, art - and a little bit of LIT.

%d bloggers like this: