Category Archives: The Culinary Alphabet in Reverse

The Culinary Alphabet with a little twist…Food terms ending in the letter X (loX)

 

Good morning everyone and Pete… time for another post which is this crazy idea from one of my fellow scribes …but food fun…this week its food or cookery terms that end with the letter X… surprisingly I  found a few …All good fun once again!

Next week is the final post of the series which has been fun and a learning curve…never to old to learn new tricks…lol

Beeswax:

Made from the honeycomb of the honeybee and other bees. The mixing of pollen oils into honeycomb wax turns the white wax into a yellow or brown colour.

In foods and beverages, white beeswax and beeswax absolute (yellow beeswax treated with alcohol) is used as a non-gelling thickener.

Mixed with a combination of olive oil, honey and beeswax it has been shown to reduce dermatitis and psoriasis.

Another tip is that if you have some pure beeswax you can use it to grease your baking tins and after a few uses it will build up and dispense with the need to grease the tin…I also came across a lovely sounding recipe for canels which given that I was researching beeswax and candles at first I thought it was a typo so clicked the link and they are beautiful little French pastries…

A  small French pastry flavoured with rum and vanilla with a soft and tender custard centre and a dark, thick caramelized crust. It takes the shape of a small, striated cylinder up to five centimetres in height with a depression at the top. A speciality of the Bordeaux region of France, today it is widely available in pâtisseries in France and abroad.

Which brings me nicely onto number two in my list…

Bordeaux:

Is a region in France and it is also one of my all-time favourite red wines…not forgetting the memorable Bordeaux white wines the taste is sublime…Having already completed a marathon(26.2)miles I would happily dust of my running shoes and partake in this one…Marathon du Medoc…

If you are a lover of a great Bordeaux then read this…Vintage Guide.

Breadbox:

As its name suggests it is where to keep your bread…

Choux:

A beautiful pastry dough think profiteroles and eclairs…

Cox:

No, it’s not an orange…for those of you who have read previous posts…lol…it is an Apple a beautiful apple and one I miss…Known however as the “Cox’s Orange Pippin” first grown in 1830, at Colnbrook in Buckinghamshire, England, by the retired brewer and horticulturist Richard Cox.

An apple which is not too sweet and has a slightly sour note…probably one of my favourite eating apples…

Sauté a quartered and peeled Cox’s apple in butter with a handful of sultanas until golden. Add a lug of calvados, a sprinkling of sugar and a squeeze of lemon juice and continue to cook until just tender. Delicious served with ice cream and pancakes…Delicious!

Flax:

Also known as common flax or linseed, is a flowering plant, Linum usitatissimum, in the family Linaceae. It is cultivated as a food and fibre crop in regions of the world with a temperate climate.

Now classed as a superfood the health properties of the flax goes back centuries…In fact, Charles the Great ordered his subjects to eat flax seeds for their health. So it’s no wonder they acquired the name Linum usitatissimum, meaning “the most useful.”

Fruit and Veg Box:

If you cannot grow your own then local fruit and vegetable boxes are fruits and vegetables which are in season, freshly harvested and you are supporting your local farmer win-win all round…You may find something you haven’t tried before which always a bonus …they can also work out more cost-effective and delivered to your door…It doesn’t get much better than that…

Gateaux:

 

Yes, it’s a fancy cake...a celebration cake…BUT what is the difference between a cake and a Gateaux? A cake is a sweet dish which is made out of flour, eggs, sugar and leavening agent. … Whereas gateau is derived from French which means sponge or foam cake. The main ingredients are flour, eggs and no leavening agent will be used. It has more layers when compared to a cake.

Gravadlax:

A Nordic salmon dish made by using a cure of salt, sugar and dill…usually served as an appetiser…thinly sliced and served on bread with a dill and mustard sauce called hovmästarsås, or served with boiled potatoes instead of bread.

Lox:

A fillet of brined salmon often served in bagels with cream cheese…

Mirepoix:

A sautéed mixture of diced vegetables (such as carrots, celery, and onions), herbs, and sometimes ham or bacon used especially as a basis for soups, stews, and sauces. Also, one way to show of your knife skills as a chef …often young chefs are charged with doing this and spend hours honing that craft as every single piece should be the same size, not an easy task…

Roux:

Is a mixture of flour and fat cooked together and used to thicken sauces. Roux is typically made from equal parts of flour and fat by weight. The flour is added to the melted fat or oil on the stovetop, blended until smooth, and cooked to the desired level of brownness.

There are three types of roux: white, blonde and brown. They all contain the same ingredients equal parts flour and fat—but the colours differ based on how long you cook the mixture. Again a job for a young chef…

Smokebox:

They come in all sorts of shapes and sizes from a basic homemade one to quite a fancy one…

Don’t have a smokebox and want to smoke some fish or meat now? Easy…

Toadflax:

Common Names: 
Yellow toadflax, Butter and eggs, wild snapdragon, common toadflax, ramsted, flaxweed,
Jacob’s ladder.
Is a wild, edible nutritious food in some parts of the world it is considered an invasive plant.
A natural medicine the whole plant is used by natural/herbal practitioners and has been for
hundreds of years.
♦♦♦♦♦
Next week is the final post Y and Z…What comes next? Still the alphabet…but
a different topic which I hope you will enjoy…

That’s all for today I hope you have found something interesting and unknown…I hope Pete can oblige with something I haven’t mentioned ending in X…I am so kind to Pete…haha…x

Stay safe, have fun and laugh a lot as you know what I am going to say it is free and proven to be good for your health…..Laughter aside…My thoughts and prayers are with all the people who have been or will be touched by this Covid-19 virus…the new lockdowns and ongoing travel restrictions…stay safe be aware and social isolate where required and we will beat this thing…Vaccination programmes are taking off around the world so many of you will now have had your first jab it does seem that there are still those who are wavering or just flatly refusing…my thoughts on that?

Thank you so much for your visit today I hope you have enjoyed the read…Please feel free to leave a comment as you know I love to chat…Love Carol xxx

The Culinary Alphabet with a little twist…Food terms ending in the letter V (chicken kieV and W ( talloW)…

 

Good morning everyone and Pete… time for another post which is this crazy idea from one of my fellow scribes …but food fun…this week its food or cookery terms that end with the letter V…not surprisingly I only found a few …which means I joined  V with the letter W which was a tad easier …a few more…some new to me, some quite old terms but…All good fun once again!

Chicken Kiev:

A boned and skinned chicken breast stuffed with garlic butter then rolled in breadcrumbs…and cooked very nice with a salad…

Ingredients:

• 4 skinless chicken breasts
• 125 gm dried breadcrumbs
• 50 gm parmesan cheese grated
• 2-3 egg beaten(depending) on size
• 50 gm flour
• Pinch paprika pepper
• Oil for frying
• For the garlic butter:
• 6-8 cloves garlic finely chopped or crushed
• 150 gm butter
• 2 tbsp chopped parsley
• Juice ½ lime/lemon

Let’s Cook!

Place all the garlic butter ingredients in a bowl and season well. Mash with a fork until well combined, shape into a sausage shape using cling film to help you shape it, then tightly wrap and chill or freeze until really firm. It can be made up to 3 days in advance. When firm, slice each into 4 even pieces.

Lay a chicken breast on a chopping board and use a sharp knife to make a deep pocket inside the breast. The easiest way is to push the point of a knife into the fat end, keep going halfway into the fillet. Be careful not to cut all the way through or the butter will leak out when cooking. Repeat with the remaining breasts.

Push 2 discs of butter inside each chicken breast, press to flatten and re-seal with your hands. Set aside.

Mix the breadcrumbs and Parmesan on one plate, and tip the eggs onto another. On a third plate, mix the flour with paprika and some salt.

Dip each breast in the flour, then the egg and finally the breadcrumbs, repeating so each Kiev has a double coating (this will make them extra crisp and help to keep the butter inside).

Chill for at least 1 hr before cooking,

To cook, heat the oven to 180C/160C fan/ gas 4.

Schav:

Is a cold, flavourful Russian soup made from the herb Sorrell… cold green borscht a summer soup.

Uzbeki Plov:

Plov (sometimes also called “osh”) is widely considered to be the national dish of Uzbekistan. It’s a hearty rice pilaf and you’ll probably notice that the word “plov” and “pilaf” are essentially the same. A rice dish cooked with lamb or beef with onions.

The letter W:

Brew:

To prepare (beer, ale, etc.) by steeping, boiling, and fermentation or by infusion and fermentation OR to prepare (a drink or other liquid) by infusion in hot water brew tea.

Cashew:

Cashews are a kidney-shaped seed sourced from the cashew tree — a tropical tree native to Brazil but now cultivated in various warm climates across the world. Although commonly referred to as tree nuts, and nutritionally comparable to them, cashews are really seeds

Keto Chow:

Keto Chow is a nutrient-rich, meal replacement for anyone who craves convenience and ease on the keto diet.

Coleslaw:

apples- white cabbage-carrots

Apple coleslaw

A delicious salad made from shredded cabbage with a mayo dressing. Coleslaw can be served as a side with fish or meat as a topping on a baked potato…Quick and easy to make it can be made in 5 mins…

Corkscrew:

A gadget which can be used to open a bottle with a cork or it is also the name of a pasta…a shape that originated in Southern Italy and translated means “small wheels”

Chow Yee Kow:

Is a Chinese fish stir fry… Pieces of firm fish stir-fried with vegetables.

Feverfew:

A plant native to Asia Minor and The Balkans although it is now grown around the world. A traditional herbal medicine which is commonly used to treat migraines…

Instantly recognised as belonging to the daisy family.

Honeydew:

Honeydew melon, or honey melon, is a fruit that belongs to the melon species Cucumis melo (muskmelon). The sweet flesh of the honeydew is typically light green, while its skin has a white-yellow tone. Its size and shape are similar to that of its relative, the cantaloupe.

Kinnow:

A mandarin hybrid…is a high yield mandarin hybrid cultivated extensively in the wider Punjab region of India and Pakistan. Although it looks very similar to an orange it is a lot juicier and has a more sour taste than the orange which is sweeter. The kinnow contains about 2.5 times more calcium than a regular orange … Also, the peel of this fruit is as beneficial as any other citrus fruit.

Mallow:

Mallow is a plant used in traditional medicine…Mallow is a plant. People use the flower and leaf to make medicine.

Mallow is used for irritation of the mouth and throat, dry cough, and bronchitis. It is also used for stomach and bladder complaints.

To treat wounds, some people put mallow in a warm moist dressing (poultice) and apply it directly to the skin, or add it to bathwater.

In foods, mallow is used as a colouring agent…

Marrow:

A cousin of the immature courgette and zucchini…a big cousin as marrows can grow to quite a size…they are then something my mother used to make for dinner…Stuffed Marrow… 

Bone Marrow:

The bone marrow of animals is widely used by humans as food. It consists of yellow marrow contained in long bones. There is also red marrow, which contains more nutrients than yellow marrow. It may be found in bone-in cuts of meat purchased from a butcher or supermarket…

It seems to have become very popular again over the last few years in culinary circles…Cooked they are also a favourite with my dog Saangchai he loves to chew on a marrow bone.

Mayhaw:

The mayhaw, the fruit of the mayhaw tree, is a lesser-known berry that is harvested in—you guessed it—May. They’re actually hawthorn berries that ripen and drop in early summer, around the month of May.

Paw Paw:

 

Native to Eastern North America it is a large yellowish to brown fruit. From the outside, it can be mistaken for Papaya but the flesh of Papaya is bright orange and pawpaw has a yellow flesh

Stew:

Meat and vegetables cooked in a gravy and then served..to me it seems an old fashioned term that now is referred to as a casserole…My mother used to make a good, tasty beef stew…lovely with dumplings nothing like it on a cold winters day…

Tallow:

A rendered form of beef or mutton fat…it is solid at room temperature and provided it is kept in an airtight container it can be kept for a long period of time without refrigeration.

Many refer to tallow as an ‘old fashioned fat’ because historically, it was the primary fat used for cooking and frying thanks to its unusually high smoke point. However, tallow was replaced with refined vegetable oils (such as canola), when some studies claimed that saturated fats cause heart disease.

Most commercial soap bars are made with tallow! Tallow hardens and lathers well, and can be used in place of other vegetable oils, such as palm oil, that are commonly used in soap making.

Tallow can also be used in candlemaking…just melt then cool in a canning container add a wick and allow to harden…easy…

That’s all for today I hope you have found something interesting and unknown…I hope Pete can oblige with something I haven’t mentioned ending in V or W…I am so kind to Pete…haha..x

Next week it will be culinary terms ending in the letter X …chouX…

Stay safe, have fun and laugh a lot as you know what I am going to say it is free and proven to be good for your health…..Laughter aside…My thoughts and prayers are with all the people who have been or will be touched by this Covid-19 virus…the new lockdowns and restrictions..stay safe be aware and social isolate where required and we will beat this thing…xx

Thank you so much for your visit today I hope you have enjoyed the read…Please feel free to leave a comment as you know I love to chat…Love Carol xxx

The Culinary Alphabet with a little twist…Food terms ending in the letter U( tirasamU)…

Good morning everyone and Pete… time for another post which is this crazy idea from one of my fellow scribes …but food fun…this week its food that ends with the letter U…surprisingly I found a few…some new to me…All good fun once again!

The Amanatsu:

Is a citrus fruit whose use has long been popular in Japan and has a characteristic sour and slightly bitter taste. Amanatsu peels are rich in Vitamin C, citric acid and pectin and make ideal ingredients, particularly for summer confectionery. Amanatsu oranges are believed to be a hybrid of a pomelo and sour orange and are native to Japan. Amanatsu oranges can be extremely sour and are typically harvested and stored for a short period before they are consumed. This storage period reduces the acid within the flesh creating a sweet-tart flavour. particularly valued for their bright flavour and fragrant zest, Amanatsu oranges are often used fresh and are a staple ingredient in Japanese cooking.

Baijiu:

A Chinese Liqueur… Baijiu is made by fermenting cooked sorghum, and occasionally other grains, along with a starter called jiuqu (“jiu” for alcohol and “qu” for koji, a fungus used to make soy sauce, miso, and sake).

Casu Martzu:

Often called the most dangerous cheese in the world, casu marzu is an Italian delicacy defined by its illegal status and the maggots that infest it.

The best comparison that can be made is to the taste of very ripe gorgonzola cheese. Though, what you’re actually tasting is larvae excrement.

Contreau:

A popular orange flavoured liqueur…crepes flamed with Contreau…Yes, please!

Fondu:

Just image melted chocolate and a strawberry …

Or a Swiss melted cheese served in a communal pot (caquelon or fondu pot) over a portable stove (réchaud) heated with a candle or spirit lamp, and eaten by dipping bread into the cheese using long-stemmed forks.

Either way, both are very delicious…

Gateau:

The tale of two cakes!… It seems that while a Gâteau is a cake, a cake is not necessarily a gâteau.

Cakes are more likely to have a buttercream frosting, whereas gâteaux are more likely to have a rich buttery between-layer ingredient, and generally has a thinner icing. Like many French things, a gâteau is just fancier.

Hyuganatsu:

Hyuganatsu is a citrus fruit originally grown in Miyazaki, and tales say the first tree was found in a house in MIyazaki around 1820. Since then the fruit has been named “Hyuganatsu” and cultivated in various places.

An orange as I know it generally has white pith which is bitter and we do not eat…This summer Orange is different called white fluff…The bright white dress (albedo) between the outer peel and the fruit, which has a mildly sweet flavour is savoured and eaten as it boosts the flavour of the fruit.

Irn Bru:

Often classed as Scotlands other national drink is a soft carbonated drink. Packed full of E-numbers, including yellow and red food colouring, both of which are believed to increase hyperactivity, Irn Bru isn’t the best choice for the kids. With a high-calorie count and added caffeine, it’s not one to choose if you’re on a diet or have problems sleeping either.

Kabosu:

Kombu:

Yeah, its not a citrus fruit… it’s an edible seaweed popular in East Asia. widely used in Japanese cooking for its umami taste. Rubbery in texture it is not recommended to eat…added to soups and stews to increase the nutrition punch, and add that umami (deep savoury) flavour, Once cooked, remove the kombu… a bit like I remove bay leaves…

Kuruma Fu:

They are wheat gluten rings…legend tells us they were created for Buddhist monks to replace the meat in their diets.

Tiramisu:

Is a delicious Italian coffee flavoured dessert…made of ladyfingers (finger-shaped) sponge cakes) dipped in coffee, layered with a whipped mixture of eggs, sugar and mascarpone cheese, flavoured with cocoa.

Tofu:

Yes…Tofu!

https://carolcooks2.com/2021/01/25/meatless-monday-week-3/

Yuzu:

Because the yuzu is considered a citron, the juice is very minimal, thus often expensive. Outside of a few Asian cuisines and particularly in Japanese cultural circles, yuzu is seldom grown or used because it’s rather rare.

That’s all for today I hope you have found something interesting and unknown…I hope Pete can oblige with something I haven’t mentioned ending in U…I am so kind to Pete…haha..x

Next week it will be culinary terms ending in the letter V…shaV…

Stay safe, have fun and laugh a lot as you know what I am going to say it is free and proven to be good for your health…..Laughter aside…My thoughts and prayers are with all the people who have been or will be touched by this Covid-19 virus…the new lockdowns and restrictions..stay safe be aware and social isolate where required and we will beat this thing…xx

Thank you so much for your visit today I hope you have enjoyed the read…Please feel free to leave a comment as you know I love to chat…Love Carol xxx

The Culinary Alphabet with a little twist…Food terms ending in the letter T(chestnuT)

Good morning everyone and Pete… time for another post which is this crazy idea from one of my fellow scribes …but food fun…this week its food that ends with the letter T…this letter is similar to S in so much that you can find many words ending in nut, beet, root, plant, fruit …Which meant I could choose many words so I have tried to find foods which don’t have the addition of those words but are a fruit, vegetable or term in their own right although there are some exceptions…all good fun once again!

Arhat:

A fruit native to Southern China and here in Northern Thailand…named after the Buddhist monks who first cultivated the fruit centuries ago it is also known as Monk Fruit or Buddha Fruit.

Arrowroot :

Arrowroot powder is a versatile ingredient and often used in gluten-free recipes. Arrowroot powder is extracted using simpler, more traditional methods, without the use of high heat or harsh chemicals, unlike cornflour.

Gaining in popularity in the Western world as a thickener… people are looking for substitutes and alternatives to cornstarch, either due to corn allergies and sensitivities or to avoid anything GMO and pesticide-laden.

Not only a thickener it can also be used in baking…blended with other flours for desserts and baking bread…arrowroot mixed with dried herbs can be used as a coating to your fried chicken.

Just be aware that you cannot substitute it on a 1:1 ratio..think gloopy mess trust me I know x…If replacing cornstarch start with a 1/3-1/2 ratio until you get your desired consistency.

Blackcurrant:

I have happy memories of picking blackcurrants with my grandma for her jam making and the purple fingers and mouth she used to tell me I ate more than I picked. Something I can’t get here even dried not sure why that is…The blackcurrant is packed with vitamin C and I envy anyone who has bushes in their garden…I can remember the taste and that little pop of sour…

Carrot:

An orange root vegetable although it does come in other colours purple(my fav), black, yellow, white and red it is instantly recognisable I would think…That crunchy, tasty highly nutritious vegetable is a staple in my kitchen it can be boiled, steamed, roasted made into soups, added to sets and casseroles, slaws are just eaten raw with hummus and don’t forget carrot cake …heaven… my daughter had a carrot cake as her wedding cake in Jamacia…not your ordinary carrot cake slightly more decorative and sumptuous…

Carrots are a particularly good source of beta carotene, fibre, vitamin K1, potassium, and antioxidants. They also have a number of health benefits the perfect health food…

Candlenut:

I have heard of candlenut but know little to none about it…Difficult to establish where the Candlenut is native to due to it being quite early on distributed throughout the new and old world tropics…it has quite a varied past and many names around Asia…Wikipedia

Chaat:

Chaat or chat is a savoury snack that originated in India, typically served at roadside tracks from stalls or food carts across the Indian subcontinent in India, Pakistan, Nepal, and Bangladesh.

Chestnut:

Roasted chestnuts I have early memories of chestnuts being roasted in the embers of the fire or on bonfire night in the ashes…later in life when I was taken to London by my aunt and Uncle it was a treat to buy them from the kerbside vendors…indeed they can also be found roasted in a similar way here…it is only as I have become more of an experimental cook that I have used chestnuts in my cooking.

Is it a fruit or a nut?

Botanically, most nuts are the seeds of a fruit, while true nuts — such as chestnuts, acorns, and hazelnuts — are fruits in and of themselves.

My favourite chestnut is the water chestnut…the one you find in Chinese dishes that lovely crisp bite they don’t have a hard shell-like the chestnuts of my childhood but a soft black skin…

Healthwise…they can be eaten: boiled, roasted, and dried, or in the form of jam, flour, soups, in pasta dishes, in cakes and desserts… They are also excellent sources of vitamins and minerals (such as manganese, molybdenum, copper and magnesium).

Of course, there were also the fruits of the horse chestnut...Who remembers playing conkers as a kid…it was such fun until the health and safety brigade got involved…I mean I have had few black eyes from a conker but it never killed me and now…I’m not even going to get started…

Confit:

Seems to be quite fashionable now especially on TV cookery shows…Confit is any type of food that is cooked slowly over a long period of time as a method of preservation. Confit is a cooking term to describe food cooked in grease, oil or sugar water, at a lower temperature, as opposed to deep-frying.

Eggplant:

Eggplants, aubergines or brinjal are all one and the same depending on where in the world you hail from…a low-calorie vegetable which provides a range of nutrients and fibre…very popular in the Meditteranean and also in Asia…

Here in Thailand eggplants are used in curries, dips, eaten raw my favourite are those little purple ones eaten raw…or the big, purple glossy one can be grilled with parmesan, made into a moussaka, or sliced and layered into a lasagne…one of my favourite ways is brined with cabbage…

Pak Dong…Is Thai pickled cabbage which comes in many forms from just cabbage or cabbage and green onions this version has added small yellow eggplants…

Ingredients:

  • 1 white cabbage. cut or torn into pieces.
  • 8 large spring onions chopped
  • 12-15 sm yellow eggplants halved
  • Coarse Salt.

Let’s Pickle:

Layer Cabbage, Onions, eggplants and salt in the dish add a little water. Mix it all together with your hands.

We then leave the dish covered on the kitchen top or in the sun for 1 day.

Pickled cabbage with egg plants

Then drain and lightly rinse and add more salt if required. Cover and leave for 2/3 days or until it reaches your ideal taste. With pickled cabbage, it is purely down to personal taste some like it saltier or sour more than others. Just play with it and you will soon discover your ideal version.

My daughter in law who is Thai doesn’t like it as sour as we do… she doesn’t like the Winegar taste as she puts it… Once it reaches your required taste it is ready to eat.

This recipe is suitable for vegetarians and vegans.

Kumquat:

A kumquat is an edible, orange-like fruit that is native to Southeast Asia. Though the citrus fruit resembles an orange in shape and colour, it’s actually quite small—about the size of an olive. Typically, kumquats are round or oblong.

Kurrat:

Kurrat, or Egyptian leek (Arabic: كراث‎), is grown in the Middle East for its leaves. It is closely related to elephant garlic and leeks and is generally regarded as being in the same species, though it is also commonly listed as Allium kurrat.

Kurrat is a very popular vegetable in Egypt and other Mediterranean countries. Kurrat was found in an Egyptian tomb and has been cultivated for at least 2000 years ago.

Lotus Root:

A popular vegetable in Asia…Lotus roots are usually sliced crosswise to reveal their attractive pattern of holes. They are traditionally added to soups and stews or simply stir-fried, as well as braised in soy sauce. They can also be thinly sliced and added raw to salads. Another favourite way of enjoying them is deep-fried into chips.

Loquat:

What is the difference between a Kumquat and a Loquat? Loquats are in the Rosaceae family the same as apples, pears, peaches and nectarines. Kumquats are a citrus fruit — think of them as the small, tart cousins to the more popular sweet orange. … Both are little orange-coloured oval fruits…

The Loquat is native to China …the seeds, and leaves are packed with powerful plant compounds and have been used in traditional medicine for thousands of years.

Mangetout:

Flat pea pods are also known as snow peas or sugar peas…eaten whole either in stir-fries or curries they are picked while very young …a good source of B1 (thiamin) and folic acid. And because you eat the whole pod, mange tout is a greater source of the antioxidant vitamins A and C than ordinary peas. They are also an excellent source of dietary fibre.

Cons: Overcooking will deplete the nutritional value.

Pluot:

A fruit name I wasn’t familiar with…it is a hybrid fruit…Plumcots…are 50-50 crosses between plums and apricots a Pluot is more plum than apricot and has a smooth skin.

Rocket:

Rocker or Arugula is a leafy vegetable known for its fresh, tart and peppery taste…of Meditteranean origin, it is a low growing annual herb. Fresh salad rocket is one of the greens rich in folates. 100 g of fresh greens contain 97 µg or 24% of folic acid.

Salt:

Often the subject of discussion and portrayed as the villain and that which we should restrict in our diets BUT we can’t live without salt…salt is actually an important nutrient for the human body. Your body uses salt to balance fluids in the blood and maintain healthy blood pressure, and it is also essential for nerve and muscle function.

Salt is also an essential ingredient in cooking…

Salt is also a whole post…in the meantime here is one of Sally’s posts on Salt and as always interesting and factual…

Sculpit:

Is an Italian green often called stridolo, it has long, thin lance-like leaves that can be chopped and added to egg dishes, risotto, salads, soups, and even pizza.

Yeast:

Yeast is a single-celled fungus. … It takes 20,000,000,000 (twenty billion) yeast cells to weigh one gram, or 1/28 of an ounce, of cake yeast. A tiny organism with a long name. The scientific name for the yeast that baker’s use is Saccharomyces Cerevisiae, or “sugar-eating fungus”. A very long name for such a tiny organism ..an essential ingredient in baked goods and bread…

That’s all for today I hope you have found something interesting and unknown…I hope Pete can oblige with something I haven’t mentioned ending in T…I am so kind to Pete…haha..x

Next week it will be culinary terms ending in the letter U…Yuzu…

Stay safe, have fun and laugh a lot as you know what I am going to say it is free and proven to be good for your health…..Laughter aside…My thoughts and prayers are with all the people who have been or will be touched by this Covid-19 virus…the new lockdowns and restrictions..stay safe be aware and social isolate where required and we will beat this thing…xx

Thank you so much for your visit today I hope you have enjoyed the read…Please feel free to leave a comment as you know I love to chat…Love Carol xxx

 

 

The Culinary Alphabet with a little twist…Food terms ending in the letter S ( asparaguS)

Good morning everyone and Pete… time for another post which is this crazy idea from one of my fellow scribes …but food fun…this week its food that ends with the letter S…this letter is different in so much that you can add an S to so many words…Which meant I could choose words which had a plural or not…I have mixed and matched…all good fun!

Ants:

Here in Thailand, I have come across many plants, animals, eggs which I never would have dreamt of eating or even thought anyone would eat them …living here has opened up a whole new culinary world for me …The world of Ants Eggs I have had them in a beautiful Thai Village soup and a Spicy Ant Egg Salad...Living here we are sometimes plagued with ants and they have a nasty bite and are not far behind mosi’s on our hit list although I must admit watching them they really are clever insects.

In a study released online on July 22 in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society: Biological Sciences, researchers at Arizona State University and Princeton University show that ants can accomplish a task more rationally than our – multimodal, egg-headed, tool-using, bipedal, opposing-thumbed – selves…Clever than us then…

Asparagus:

I love asparagus its old folk name is sparrow grass how quaint is that? Asparagus can be cooked on the griddle, steamed, boiled, oven-roasted, pan-roasted …added to stir-fries even eaten raw in a salad if you can get the very thin, tender ones…one of my favourite ways is lightly steamed and rolled in brown bread with some smoked salmon…wonderful…rolled in bacon and griddled it is a wonderful thing…it can be paired with strawberries such a versatile vegetable which comes in both green and white asparagus.

Beans:

Beans dried or fresh they are equally versatile and delicious…They can be purchased fresh, frozen, canned there are over 40,00 types of bean varieties with over 400 types eaten around the world with India being the largest producer of beans. The most popular bean is the Chickpea…There are French beans, Chinese long beans, Thai snake beans, runner beans, broad beans, wing beans, kidney beans, Coffee Beans, cocoa beans, butter and haricot beans I could go on forever and run of space but you get the picture there are many types of beans.

I often get asked why Baked Beans in tomato sauce are practically a national dish eaten by Brits…Beans on toast…lovely…Made by Heinz apparently way back in 1927 one of the executives came up with the idea as pure marketing ploy…it certainly worked especially during the war years as in WW2 classed as a cheap protein and eaten for breakfast, dinner or tea by millions…

Brussel Sprouts:

Brussels sprouts are high in fibre, vitamins, minerals and antioxidants, making them a nutritious addition to your diet. Unfortunately, people either love them or hate them…I love them especially when they are freshly picked and have had a frost they are delicious…

Camas:

The sweet bulbs of the Common Camas are considered by many to be a Northwest American native food delicacy. The taste is often compared to a baked pear, fig, or sweet potato, and can even used to sweeten other foods. The longer they’re cooked, the sweeter they get.

Fried Camas is also food cooked over a campfire.

Chitterlings:

Sometimes pronounced/spelt as chitlins or chittlins…are a prepared food made from the intestines of a large hog although sometimes cattle and other animals are used.

The taste of chitterlings is indescribable. Their mild flavour is defined by how they are seasoned. They are more tender than bacon and in some parts are called “wrinkle steaks.”

Courgette Flowers:

Stuffed courgette flowers have become a very popular food over the last few years…not something I have tried …I don’t think I have eaten anywhere where they were on the menu and it’s not something I have tried to make at home…Have you eaten them? Do you like them?

Coulis:

A term mainly used to describe fruit purees although pureed strained vegetables are also called a coulis…

Cress:

Is a fast-growing edible herb…what kid hasn’t grown mustard and cress either at school or at home? Mustard Cress also called Garden Cress is grown in soil whereas Watercress is grown in water…Garden cress is quite delicate but lovely as an egg and cress sandwich…a childhood favourite and something I still like as a treat.

Watercress is far more peppery and is lovely in a salad or can be used in savoury dishes…It is also very nutritious…High in Vitamins C, A, K & B6, it has a higher calcium content than milk and more potassium than a banana. It’s high in iron and is a source of protein.

The vitamin C in watercress helps your body digest the iron, meaning that you get optimum nutrition… Watercress has also been linked to anti-ageing processes, having anti-cancer properties and has shown it can support your gut health.

Watercress also makes a great pesto, soup and sauce for both meat and fish…

Dabberlocks:

An edible seaweed also called winged kelp…it can be eaten fresh or cooked it is a traditional food along the coasts of the far north Atlantic …

Fiddlehead Ferns:

Are the furled fronds of a young fern and often harvested as a vegetable…if you are lucky you may be able to forage them or find them at local farmers markets.

Greens:

Greens refer to leafy vegetables such as collard greens, spinach, spring greens, winter greens, kale, microgreens, cabbage,  mustard greens, beet greens just to name a few…an important part of a healthy diet. They’re packed with vitamins, minerals and fibre but low in calories. Eating a diet rich in leafy greens can offer numerous health benefits.

Lemongrass:

The leaves and oil are used to make medicine…it can be used to make tea I have dried some lemongrass as it is plentiful here and use it to make tea it is also widely used in many Thai recipes and around Asia a popular herb.

Mushrooms:

As there are over 50,000 species of mushrooms, including moulds and yeasts…it would be a whole post to go into any depth…Briefly, various types are hallucinogenic, 1 to 2 % of species are poisonous, and others are used for their medicinal properties. Although most mushrooms are edible, few species are actually consumed, as most species can be tough, woody, or gelatinous, give off an unpleasant smell, or taste bad. Only about 20 varieties are truly flavourful…these include button mushrooms, oyster mushrooms, shitake mushrooms, enoki mushrooms, chanterelle mushroom, King Oyster mushroom, Chestnut mushroom, cremini mushrooms, portabello mushrooms and chanterelle mushrooms and many more too numerous to mention…

Olives:

Olives have been a part of the human diet for thousands of years, long before the canning industry, grocery stores, and martinis came into play. But a few decades ago, your average person knew only a few varieties—some were green, some were black, some were pitted, and the best ones were pimento-stuffed…and that was that.

They can be ground into spreads and tapenades, added to salads, stews and sauces…how about a dirty Martini…or just eaten as they are…

Some of the best oils come from the olive it is such a versatile drupe…

Onions:

Onions garlic red onions brown onions

Do you know your onions? Garlic, shallots, leeks and chives are all part of the onion family. There are red onions, sweet onions, white onions, brown onions, scallions or green onions, cipollini onions the list goes on…Did you know ramps are wild leeks…?

I think there is an onion for every type of dish or salad…What would a burger or a hot dog be without onions?

Peppers:

Peppers range from mild, sweet to the very hottest and there are over 50,000 different varieties around the world…Each country and region has their own favourites …They come in a variety of colours green, orange, yellow, red, purple and peppers so dark they look almost black…

Potatoes:

Potatoes…jersey royals are one of my favourites, King Edwards, Charlotte, russets, white,  fingerlings..sweet potatoes, the purple ones being my favourite…

Did you know? More than a billion people worldwide eat potato, and global total crop production exceeds 300 million metric tons. There are more than 4,000 varieties of native potatoes, mostly found in the Andes. They come in many sizes and shapes. There are also over 180 wild potato species.

Radishes:

Mostly eaten raw the radish is an edible root vegetable…they have a pungent flavour and are mostly eaten raw as a salad vegetable. They are also a good source of Vit C and other vitamins they are also a cousin of the cabbage. Something I have never radishes and that is roast them…Have you?

 Sonkers, Slumps, Grunts and Crumbles…

What do you call it?… I call it crumble but there does seem to be local variations in ingredients… They are not all the same…

Tomatoes:

Mr Google told me that there are over 10,000 tomato cultivars…I love tomatoes in any way shape or form the little cherry tomatoes or the big beefsteak ones and anything in between…You can eat them raw, cooked added to stews, curries, chilli, spag bol the list is endless…A pizza topping…There are red tomatoes, green tomatoes and green doesn’t always mean unripe where a tomato is concerned. There are vine tomatoes beautiful heirloom tomatoes which come in a variety of colours green, yellow, red, purple …

So what is unique about heirloom tomatoes? Heirlooms are open-pollinated which means they are pollinated out in the wide-open as nature intended. Bees, insects, birds, or how the wind blows: there is no intentional intervention. Heirlooms are grown from saved seeds and are at least 50 years old, and some can be 100+ years old.

Wheatgrass:

Wheatgrass is a food made from the Triticum aestivum plant. It’s regarded as a super potent health food with amazing benefits. It’s usually consumed as a fresh juice, but it also comes in powdered form. Fresh wheatgrass juice is considered to be a living food.

That’s all for today I hope you have found something interesting and unknown…I hope Pete can oblige with something I haven’t mentioned ending in S…I am so kind to Pete…haha..x

Next week it will be culinary terms ending in the letter T…chestnuT…

Stay safe, have fun and laugh a lot as you know what I am going to say it is free and proven to be good for your health…..Laughter aside…My thoughts and prayers are with all the people who have been or will be touched by this Covid-19 virus…the new lockdowns and restrictions..stay safe be aware and social isolate where required and we will beat this thing…xx

Thank you so much for your visit today I hope you have enjoyed the read…Please feel free to leave a comment as you know I love to chat…Love Carol xxx

 

 

 

The Culinary Alphabet with a little twist…Q (bbQ) and R (caviaR)

Good morning everyone and Pete… time for another post which is this crazy idea from one of my fellow scribes …but food fun…this week its food that ends with the letters Q & R…Enjoy! My grey matter has certainly been challenged this week without much luck with the letter  Q .

Q is the seventeenth letter of the alphabet and not an easy letter to use in any word. In English, the letter Q is most often followed by the letter U, to make the sound “kew.” Although some words do contain Q without the U, they are rare.

The Danes so loathed the use of the letter that they abolished the use of the letter Q in 1872.

Which has led me to the conclusion that Q will join forces with R…so all is not lost…As always I will leave a few for Pete he is not going to get away lightly…I also challenge him to find something edible ending in Q…x

BBQ…

Who doesn’t love a BBQ? Here you can find both meat and fish on almost every street corner …

Beautiful mushrooms BBQ and pounded with chillies, fish sauce into a beautiful dip or fish BBQ in salt served with sticky rice and papaya salad ..a favourite brunch of mine or tender squid cooked on the BBQ and served with a fiery chilli sauce…these are all my favourite BBQ meals …What are yours?

Coq…

Coq au vin is a French dish and a favourite in this house of chicken braised with wine, lardons, mushrooms, and optionally garlic. A red Burgundy wine is typically used, though many regions of France make variants using local wines one of the first dishes I cooked for my hubby many moons ago…

Suq…

A local variant of the word souk…an Arab market or marketplace… a bazaar which sells food…

You can tell I have dredged deep here as Q was a challenge...Now on to R which after Q was a doddle a walk in the park…I have tried to find some unusual names something different but mainly they are everyday foods and words that we use…Enjoy!

Agar-Agar:

Is a gelatinous substance that is extracted from seaweed and processed into flakes, powders and sheets. It is commonly used in Asian cuisines and as a flavourless vegan substitute for gelatin. Agar helps gel, stabilize, texturize and thicken beverages, baked goods, confectioneries, dairy products, dressings, meat products and sauces.

 A general rule of thumb is to use 1 tablespoon of agar flakes or 1 teaspoon of agar powder to thicken 1 cup of liquid.

I keep seeing this when shopping but have yet to try it out…one for my Meatless Mondays…

Butter:

cow-grazing

I have over the years tried numerous low fat spreads and all equally either you just would prefer dry bread or crackers or you couldn’t cook with them…A few years ago I decided that if I ate or used proper butter it would be grass-fed and delicious just taken in moderation…

Yes, butter is a trans fat and trans fats always ring alarm bells …Don’t they? BUT unlike trans fats in processed foods, dairy trans fats are considered healthy.

Caper:

One of my favourite little pops of deliciousness…Capers are the pickled flower buds of a thorny, trailing shrub that grows like a weed all over the Mediterranean. … These berries, called caperberries cured in brine they add that zing to many a dish…

Caviar:

Caviar is considered a delicacy and is eaten as a garnish or a spread. Caviar can also come at a reasonable cost and like Champagne can also be very, very costly and a luxury item…it is fish eggs…like the bright orange salmon roe (ikura) which sits atop sushi—but only sturgeon roe is considered caviar…a luxury…

Cauliflower:

The humble cauliflower is a vegetable I have grown up on either as a side vegetable or served with a cheese sauce…Now cauliflower has taken a new lease of life it is made into beautiful soups and purees, cauliflower can be spiced and cooked whole or roasted in thick slices or made into cauliflower rice a good alternative to normal rice if you are cutting calories …a very versatile vegetable.

Chowder:

The best chowder I have ever eaten was on a holiday in Ireland a wonderful seafood chowder…while in Phuket we had dinner with an American friend whose speciality was chowder very nice it was but my favourite is still the one we had in Ireland…

Cucumber:

A salad vegetable that I again grew up on and my father grew in his vegetable garden it was always present in salads or pickled and of course in English High Society and still found if you go for high tea in a posh London establishment thinly sliced bread minus the crust with Cucumber slices,  take pride of place.

Here they come in all sizes and are eaten raw, added to beautiful Thai salads or stir-fried…cucumber has taken on a whole new meaning now…

Eclair:

Eclairs were one of the first cakes my mother taught me to make…Made from Choux Pastry they were a Sunday Tea treat. Filled with cream and dipped in chocolate they were a wonderful thing…it is the same pasty which profiteroles are made from…

Effiler:

Is to remove the string from a bean and very thinly slice…When applied in almonds and pistachio nuts effiler means to cut into the thin slices lengthways, either with a knife or with a special instrument. The word is also used for slicing chicken or duck breast.

Some chefs use the term effilocher, particularly for cutting leeks into fine shreds.

Emincer:

Emincer is a French cooking term that means to slice thinly. It is often mistakenly thought by English-speakers to mean “chop finely” like mince that is not, however, the meaning it is to slice very thinly.

Ginger:

Ginger is a plant with leafy stems and yellowish-green flowers. The ginger spice comes from the roots of the plant. Ginger is native to warmer parts of Asia, such as China, Japan, Thailand and India, but now is grown in parts of South American and Africa. It is also now grown in the Middle East to use as medicine and with food.

I drink ginger tea almost daily and use fresh ginger in practically everything I cook very popular here… I grow it in my garden and, it is probably grown in most gardens here and for sale on every market stall…

Guar:

The guar or cluster bean is an annual legume and the source of guar gum. In foods and beverages, guar gum is used as a thickening, stabilizing, suspending, and binding agent.

Kipper:

A favourite of my fathers the smell used to linger it seemed forever…a small herring which is butterflied and then smoked generally over oak wood. Lovely with a knob of butter and some brown bread but those tiny bones…they are a great source of essential fatty acids.

Laver:

Laver is an edible seaweed which can be made into bread…Laverbread is popular in Wales and is part of local tradition.

Liver:

Like Marmite, you either love it or hate it!… Chicken Livers are very popular here whereas in the UK it was mainly calves or pigs liver which was available…Liver and Bacon or Onions was a particular favourite of my fathers and something I grew up eating.

Liver is one of the most nutrient-dense foods high in vitamin A, folic acid, iron, and zinc….chicken livers are often called a superfood…

Lobster:

An expensive luxury but there is nothing more delicious than a beautiful y cooked lobster tail however that wasn’t always the case way back in Colonial times they were known as the cockroaches of the sea there were so many of them an abundance…even used as fertilizer and fish bait because there were just so many around.

The lobster was also known as the poor man’s meal because of the overabundance of these crustaceans they were fed to prisoners, apprentices and slaves.

Medlar:

A winter fruit which has been around since the time of the Romans the medlar fruit is eaten when “bletted” which means the fruit is left until it is overripe before eating…To eat raw, peel the stalk end, hold the crown and squish out the fruit. They have a lot of pips.

They can be cooked and made into jellies or jams or bake them with white wine, a little dark sugar and vanilla bean. Then purée them and serve with panna cotta or cream…the medlar fruit is both sweet and sour at the same time quite delicious.

Pear:

Pears have been the subject of a few of my posts recently a lovely fruit which can be eaten raw or cooked, made into chutneys or pickled.

Pepper:

Bell peppers or chilli peppers it is estimated that there are over 50,000 varieties of peppers around the world from the mildest to the very hottest…

Quadriller:

Is a term used for crosses cut on food for food presentation.

Render:

Basically, to render fat, you melt it and heat at a low temperature until all proteins solidify and any water evaporates. You then filter the solids from the liquid fat. Once cooled, you are left with clean pure fat.

It’s completely usable for things like frying and sauteing, it’s just not ideal for making sweet pastries and pie crusts.

Ricer:

Often seen used by TV chefs …Forcing the cooked mealy potato through the ricer’s small holes creates rice-sized pieces of potato (hence the name) and the air that is incorporated while pressing contributes to the light fluffiness…although a potato masher does what it says and mashes potatoes they don’t have that smooth consistency that potatoes have when put through a ricer.

Tangor:

A citrus fruit hybrid of a Mandarin Orange often referred to as the temple Orange. It has a thick skin which is easy to peel.

Temper:

Image by David Greenwood-Haigh from Pixabay

To temper is a term used when making chocolate confectionery or dipped or chocolate-covered treats it gives the chocolate a smooth shiny finish.

I temper all my spices when I am cooking Indian food…it is the traditional method to extract the full flavour from the spices this can be done either with or without oil…

It is also process used when using eggs and you don’t want the eggs to cook…a little of the hot liquid is added to the beaten egg mixture a little at a time until it can be added to the hot mixture without cooking/curdling the eggs a process used when making custard.

Tourner:

A method of cutting food products into a football or barrel-like shape that forms six or seven sides on the length of the item being cut. … Rather than having small disk-like slices or longer strands of a vegetable, the Tourner cut results in a small shape with a pleasant appearance for the food being served.

Weiner:

Image by jayrubio123 from Pixabay 

Originally called wiener wurst, the wiener was brought by German Americans. The term is German for Vienna sausage which was eventually shortened to wiener. It is usually used interchangeably with hot dog or frankfurter. Just like Vienna sausage, wieners got their name from Vienna, a city in Austria

That’s all for today I hope you have found something interesting and unknown…I hope Pete can oblige with at least one ending in Q and a couple ending in R …I am so kind to Pete…haha..x

Next week it will be culinary terms ending in the letter S…sonkerS, gruntS and slumpS…

Stay safe, have fun and laugh a lot as you know what I am going to say it is free and proven to be good for your health…..Laughter aside…My thoughts and prayers are with all the people who have been or will be touched by this Covid-19 virus…the new lockdowns and restrictions..stay safe be aware and social isolate where required and we will beat this thing…xx

Thank you so much for your visit today I hope you have enjoyed the read…Please feel free to leave a comment as you know I love to chat…Love Carol xxx