Category Archives: The Culinary Alphabet in Reverse

CarolCooks2 weekly roundup…15th November-21st November…Recipes, Health, Whimsy and Christmas music…

Welcome to this week’s edition of my weekly roundup of posts…Especially for you just in case you missed any posts during the week… whatever your time zone grab a coffee or a glass of wine…Take a pew, get comfy… have a read…X

My week started with Mistletoe and Wine…Christmas Pickles…

I love pickles and I pickle almost everything my next project is to pickle some pears…Pickling is an ideal way to preserve anything where you have a lot of them as in fruits/vegetables in season or maybe you have seen a bargain and can’t resist the buy…Time to get pickling…

https://carolcooks2.com/2020/11/17/mistletoe-and-wine-christmas-pickles-2020/

Tuesday was also Homemade Bread Day…

There is nothing like a slice of freshly made bread both the smell as it wafts through the house and the taste…Delicious…we are becoming a nation of bakers again a plus side to Covid-19.

https://carolcooks2.com/2020/11/17/homemade-bread-day-november-17th-2020/

Wednesday it was the next episode of my Culinary Alphabet with a twist where the letter of the alphabet is the last letter rather than the first which has made it a tad more difficult but most enjoyable…

As you can see I combined J and K together as finding something /anything ending in J which you can eat or drink or which was a culinary term was a challenge I only found 2…I challenge all of you to find me another one…K was far easier…Enjoy!

https://carolcooks2.com/2020/11/18/the-culinary-alphabet-with-a-little-twist-tej/

Thursday I introduced you to some Alternative Healing Remedies courtesy of Sally from Smorgasbord Magazine…

Health Column

A qualified practitioner for many years Sally Cronin comes highly recommended…This week she discussed back pain the curse of many…#recommended read.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2020/11/16/smorgasbord-health-column-alternative-healing-therapies-the-alexander-technique-part-one-backpain-flexibility-headaches-by-sally-cronin/

Fruity Friday…Pears…

A beautiful fruit which is in season now and is actually better for you than an Apple…I love pears but haven’t cooked as much as I could with them and have discovered some great sounding recipes which I am going to have to try…including Pickled Pears..no surprise there then …lol

Pear chutney and some delicious sounding cakes and bread which have pears in the ingredients…

https://carolcooks2.com/2020/11/20/fruity-friday-pears/

Saturday Snippets…

Saturday Snippets is where anything goes wherever my thoughts take me…If you were wondering why the image of a funeral cart in my header picture it was because we attended the Buddist Funeral of a dear neighbour…where you go to celebrate a life well lived and make merit…when we are alive by our actions, thoughts and deeds we make our own merit as a deceased person we were there to make merit for them as were the monks so that they can pass freely into heaven…

This merit-making took place over 3 days last week the first 2 days were making merit and the third day was the cremation…The loveliest gesture for us was how welcome we were made and also time was taken to explain to us what was occurring…on the final day our friend’s granddaughter made the eulogy and her brother became a monk for the day to make merit for his grandfather which meant he had to shave his head and eyebrows the whole preparation…don the robes and participate as a monk would…

Although I speak and understand a little Thai to follow a speech is beyond me ..the loveliest thing she did which made me shed a happy tear is after each section she spoke in Thai and then she repeated that section in English …How lovely was that of her…? This meant that we could also learn more about this lovely gentle man and his life.

Finally, the body is then laid on that cart and a procession takes him to his final earthly ending…

I was struck by how loving and how papa, as we called him, was accompanied every step of the way on his final journey it was absolutely beautiful…Tissue time xx

https://carolcooks2.com/2020/11/21/saturday-snippets-21st-november-2020/

Have a wonderful Sunday..please be well and stay safe…If you are making Christmas pudding or cakes make a wish and stir the right way xxx

That’s all for this week’s roundup … fewer posts have made my stats boom…go figure… I do hope you have enjoyed it and I look forward to your comments xx

God bless you all in these turbulent times…especially those of my readers who are facing new lockdowns…Please stay safe and wear your mask and practise social distancing or this virus will not go away…x

When this is all over my hope for the future is a cleaner world… I do want to see communities, and caring for your neighbour becoming the new norm…WORKING TOGETHER INSTEAD OF WORKING AGAINST EACH OTHER…Being kind to each other…Loving someone whatever their religion or skin colour…Can we make this happen? We have to but in the right way…Are we willing to make a stand? Personally, I would love to see lessons learned..realistically I have my doubts…

Thank you for reading be well and stay safe xxx

About Carol Taylor: Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and well being.

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…Then, I will be happy!

Thank you once again for reading this post I hope you all stay safe and healthy xx

The Culinary Alphabet with a little twist…(teJ)

 

Good morning everyone and Pete… time for another post which is this crazy idea from one of my fellow scribes …but food fun…I could only find two foods ending in the letter J so have combined it with the letter K…Enjoy!

Munj:

Munj Haak is a Kashmiri vegetarian dish flavoured with asafoetida…

Tej:

Gesho ( buckthorn) stems, gathered from the highlands of Ethiopia, are sundried and packed fresh. These aromatic sticks and stem flavour centuries-old traditional brewing recipes for Beer and Ethiopian Honey wine.

How do you make Ethiopian Tej drink?
Ingredients:
  • 21 ounces (621 ml) liquid honey.
  • 63 ounces (1.86 L) water.
  • ½ teaspoon (1.6 g) brewer’s yeast.
  • 5 ounces (142 g) gesho.

Mead is considered healthier than beer and wine because it’s made with honey, which is easier for the body to metabolize, and you get the nutritional benefits of honey itself,”

Now onto the letter K…

Beefsteak Plant:

Also called perilla mint, beefsteak plant is a traditional Asian crop used in cooking and is often planted as an ornamental. Rapid growing and invasive in natural areas across the mid-Atlantic region and elsewhere.

Beefsteak Tomatoes:

One of the largest varieties of cultivated tomatoes they are juicy and meaty and make a good base for fresh sauces and dips. They are also an ideal potato to stuff or are lovely coated in breadcrumbs as a lovely side dish.

Bladderwrack:

A seaweed which can be eaten whole either raw, cooked or steamed or dried and made into a tea…with a salty fish taste, it can be used sparingly in soups or dried for future use. It is rich in fibre, antioxidants and iodine.

Breadstick:

Also known as grissini, grissino or dipping sticks, are generally pencil-sized sticks of crisp, dry baked bread that originated in Italy. Eaten with soup or dips they are easy to make at home and lovely topped with some parmesan before baking.

Buldack:

Korean style fire chicken a heavily spiced BBQ chicken dish.

Burdock:

To herbalists, burdock root is a powerful medicine however the leaves, stalks and roots are very tasty if correctly prepared. Cut before the flower is open and stripped of their rind they are a delicate vegetable which when boiled is similar in flavour to asparagus…makes a lovely salad, eaten raw with oil and vinegar some years ago they were candied with sugar which we know as angelica used in baking to decorate cakes, biscuits and sweets.

Buttermilk:

Buttermilk is a fermented dairy drink. Traditionally, it was the liquid left behind after churning butter out of cultured cream; however, most modern buttermilk is cultured.

Cempedak:

It is very similar to the much more common jackfruit, but while jackfruit is huge and oval in shape, a Cempedak is tubular and about the size of a rugby ball that’s been squished. I first discovered Cempedak in Phuket …The Cempedak fruit in the Thai language is called Champada (จำปา [th] ) which is a relative of the Jackfruit and often called the ugly cousin as when it is ripe the skin goes from green to a muddy brown colour.

It is not however as big as the jackfruit it is more the size of a rugby ball, cylinder in shape with a slightly squished in the centre.

Thai Cempedak Fruit

Photo credit: anwarsiak***sibuk*** on Visualhunt / CC BY

Highly aromatic when ripe with the taste being a mix of banana and pineapple it is lovely eaten fresh or as we discovered very nice lightly battered and deep-fried…I do love the Thai batter as they use mainly rice flour which makes for a lovely crispy batter, not at all stogy like flour-based batters can be. Unfortunately, I don’t have an image of that as they were so very nice they were eaten before I could take a picture…Very yummy they were.

It has quite a large seed which can be boiled and eaten like a small potato.

The tree bark is used as a yellow dye to colour the monk’s robes.

The fruit is rich in Vitamin A & C plus heteriflavon C which is used to eliminate the cause of Malaria parasite. With a high water content, it is also rich in enzymes, bioflavonoid, ascorbic acid and rich in minerals and vitamins.

An around healthy fruit which although found predominately in the south of Thailand I am hoping I can find some here in the North.

Cheesesteak:

A cheesesteak is a sandwich made from thinly sliced pieces of beefsteak and melted cheese in a long hoagie roll. A popular regional fast food, it has its roots in the U.S. city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Chopstick:

Are equal length pairs of sticks made from bamboo, metal or plastic and are used for cooking or eating utensils over most of East Asia…There is an art to using them which I have mostly perfected since living here.

However, depending on where you live the chopsticks may be slightly different each country has their own styles…

Crabstick:

Is an imitation crab meat made from fish meat to imitate shellfish meat…fresh crab is far healthier and has more nutrients…

Flapjack:

Made from rolled oats, brown sugar, golden syrup and fat they are traditionally cooked in a flat tin and cut into rectangles. Originating in the UK it is thought the word originated for flipping or flapping the cakes on a griddle.

Haddock:

A member of the cod family with firm flesh and a mild flavour. It can be purchased smoked or unsmoked…dyed or undyed…my favourite is traditionally dyed smoked haddock with a poached egg something I can’t get here and writing this I can taste it…sigh

A smoked haddock kedgeree is also a lovely dish with some hardboiled eggs.

Kanafeh:

Kanafeh is a traditional Middle Eastern dessert made with shredded filo pastry, or alternatively, fine semolina dough, soaked in sweet, sugar-based syrup, and typically layered with cheese, or with other ingredients such as clotted cream or nuts, depending on the region.

Latticework:

Apple pies with lattice tops

Is the pretty topping you see on pies like mine pictured above…

Salak:

Also, know here as snake fruit…a fruit which is very common in and around South East Asia. The skin is very like the markings on a snake I tend to call it snake fruit rather than salak…

A species of the palm tree it belongs to the Arecaceae family. The fruits grow in clusters at the base of the palm. It is also known as snake fruit because of its reddish-brown scaly skin. The fruit inside is sweeter than honey and sour like pineapple and very juicy.

Because the flesh is slightly acidic it makes your tongue tingle. The fruit grows around the base of the tree so often when you buy it fresh they can be covered with dirt a little like potatoes when you dig them up…

They are also quite prickly to the touch and there is a knack to opening them but like everything once you have mastered that it is quite easy. Just be careful as this fruit has a fairly hard albeit thin skin it is just getting your nail in the right place and pressing quite hard. Like everything, once you get the nack it is easy…

This evergreen tree produces fruit all the year-round.

Facts about the Sala fruit:

It is quite beneficial as eye medication and is also known as the memory fruit.

It can be eaten fresh or cooked. It is also sold in cans, like candied fruit or unripe, it can be pickled.

To pickle Salak.

Let’s Cook!

It must be peeled and deseeded. Soaked in a water and salt solution for 1 hour, then rinsed and drained.

Resoak again for 1 hour, then wash and drain.

Put in a vinegar, salt and water solution which has been boiled and cooled and let to stand for 1- 2 days before eating.

N.B. Make sure your fruit is very fresh or the jam will have a dusty taste..not nice at all.

Shaddock:

Is another name for the Pomelo Fruit…Captain Shaddock of an East Indian Company ship introduced the fruit to Barbados the fruit was called Shaddock in English a name which stuck and it still remains a name used among some…Like many fruits and vegetables, names can vary from region to region.

Pomelo salad is one of my favourite salads in Thai it is called Yum Som O…

Spatchcock:

A chicken or game bird split open and cooked…we often cook our chicken this way as it cooks quicker thus being more tender and juicy.

That’s all for today I hope you have found something interesting and unknown…

Stay safe, have fun and laugh a lot as you know what I am going to say it is Free and proven to be good for your health…..Laughter aside…My thoughts and prayers are with all the people who have been or will be touched by this Covid-19 virus…the new lockdowns and restrictions..stay safe be aware and social isolate where required and we will beat this thing…xx

About Carol Taylor:

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and wellbeing.

The environment is also something I am passionate about and although there are now no regular columns on my blog this year. It is important that we are mindful of the world we live in…We all need to be aware of our home’s carbon footprints…where does our food come from? How far does it travel…Simple to do but if we all did it…Not only would we support local businesses but reduce our carbon footprint…

green foot prints eco system

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…….Then, I will be happy!

Thank you once again for reading this post  … xx

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

That’s all for today I hope you have found something interesting…

Stay safe, have fun and laugh a lot as you know what I am going to say it is Free and proven to be good for your health…..Laughter aside…My thoughts and prayers are with all the people who have been or will be touched by this Covid-19 virus…the new lockdowns and restrictions..stay safe be aware and social isolate where required and we will beat this thing…xx

About Carol Taylor:

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and wellbeing.

The environment is also something I am passionate about and although there are now no regular columns on my blog this year. It is important that we are mindful of the world we live in…We all need to be aware of our home’s carbon footprints…where does our food come from? How far does it travel…Simple to do but if we all did it…Not only would we support local businesses but reduce our carbon footprint…

green foot prints eco system

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…….Then, I will be happy!

Thank you once again for reading this post  …I see some of you have early snow it looks so pretty xx

The Culinary Alphabet with a twist…The Letter I(chimichurrI)

 

Good morning everyone and Pete… time for another post which is this crazy idea from one of my fellow scribes …but food fun…I have left out a few obvious ones like Spaghetti and some like Ugli Fruit which I mentioned in a previous post…Enjoy!

Acai:

The Acai berry is a small grape-like berry native to the rain forests of South America…deep purple in colour they are being classed as a superfood and there are many claims being made about them however there are no long term studies to back these claims…Many fruit and vegetables offer a range of health benefits, and acai berries are no exception.

Aioli:

A sauce made of garlic, salt and olive oil with lemon juice I think it is similar to mayonnaise. There is an ongoing debate as to whether an aioli is healthier than its cousin mayonnaise. Mayo is essentially any neutral flavoured oil, with egg yolk, vinegar and lemon juice, whereas an aioli begins with pounding garlic, which has many health benefits, with a mortar and pestle and using olive oil instead of canola.

Arrosticini:

Traditional Lamb Skewers from Abruzzo region of Italia,

Basmati:

Basmati rice has long slender grains compared to normal rice. Whole grain Basmati rice has the lowest glycaemic index of all rice types which means once digested it releases its energy slower keeping blood sugar levels more stable.

Bhaji:

Who hasn’t eaten and onion bhaji?…No Indian takeaway is the same without them…This spiced Indian snack originated from the Indian subcontinent and is popular street food.

Did you know? The Guinness Record for the largest onion Bhaji goes to Bradford( an English) city and it weighed an impressive 102.2 kg or 225lb 4.9 oz.

Binjai:

A fruit belonging to the Mango family although it has a more sour taste and is quite fibrous…it is called yaa lam fruit here the tree flowers April-May and the flowers are so very pretty the tree, however, doesn’t bear fruit every year…

The Malay community consider the fruit a delicacy and eat it raw with sambal belacan which is a dip of chilli and fermented prawn paste which the Binjai is dipped into and eaten with rice. It is known as white mango…

Biryani:

Traditionally made with Basmati rice, spices and goat meat it is often now made with chicken or prawns…This rice dish is a favourite of ours and one I have been making for years…A perfect one-pot dish. In some regions of Indian Egg or potato may also be added.

Blini:

A Russian pancake...A blini or, sometimes, blin, is a Russian and Ukrainian pancake traditionally made from wheat or buckwheat flour and served with smetana, tvorog, butter, caviar and other garnishes. Blini are among the most popular and most-eaten dishes in Russia.

Broccolini:

Baby broccoli which has smaller florets and longer thinner stems…Broccolini is actually a cross-breed of broccoli and Chinese broccoli, a leafy vegetable commonly referred to as gai lan in Cantonese or Jie lan in Mandarin.

You get the florets found in broccoli and the longer stems and leaves found in Chinese broccoli.

Calamari:

By many Calamari and squid are thought to be one and the same…Squid and calamari are however two different beasts. Squid is cheaper and tougher; calamari is more tender and expensive. Although many fish stalls class them as one and the same I always by the small ones which are probably classed as calamari but however much does depend on the cooking…

Thai- squid-salad-authentic

This recipe is one of our favourites the kids love it.

Cannelloni:

Cannelloni is a tube-shaped dry pasta about 7 cm / 3″ long and 2cm / 2/3″ wide. It is stuffed with filling, covered in a sauce and cheese then baked. It does not need to be cooked before filling, it softens when baked in the oven.

One of my favourite ways of serving it is with a spinach and ricotta filling topped with a tomato sauce …Perfick!

Chapati:

Chapati, also known as roti,  shabaati, phulka, is an unleavened flatbread originating from the Indian subcontinent and staple in India, Nepal, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, East Africa and the Caribbean.

Chilli:

Chillies come in all shapes and sizes from mild to blow your head off heat…There are about 4,000 varieties of chilli in the world.

The heat is measured on the Scoville Scale…

Chimichurri:

Always made from finely chopped parsley the other ingredients vary they could include red wine vinegar, garlic, salt, black pepper, oregano, red pepper flakes, sunflower or olive oil is typical (plus a shot of hot water) Some recipes add shallot or onion, and lemon juice…many variations.

Enoki:

Fast becoming one of my favourite mushrooms they are lovely in soups or fried until crispy and used as a garnish they are very popular here…This mushroom has a mild, delicate flavour that is complemented by a slight crunch.  eaten raw or cooked. they are commonly used in Asian cooking but are also excellent in salads, sandwiches and pasta sauce a very versatile little mushroom which is popular in Japanese cuisine.

I love them lightly pickled…

Kiwi:

Also known as Chinese gooseberry is an edible berry about the size of a large hens egg. It has a green flesh which is sweetish and tangy this fruit also has numerous health benefits…The skin is a lightest brown and fuzzy…

Kohirabi:

A very versatile vegetable which can be roasted or paired with apple it makes beautiful fresh salad…

Lovi-Lovi:

Rich in vitamin C and antioxidants this brilliant scarlet colour little fruit is harvested to make chutneys, jam and wines.

Pepperoni:

Pepperoni is an American variety of salami, made from a cured mixture of pork and beef seasoned with paprika or other chilli pepper. Pepperoni is characteristically soft, slightly smoky, and bright red in colour. Thinly sliced pepperoni is a popular pizza topping.

Pequi or Souari fruit:

An edible fruit popular in some areas of Brazil…Pequi pulp is a very popular food in Goiás, Mato Grosso and Minas Gerais, eaten by itself raw or prepared or used as an ingredient in cooking or to flavour beverages. Pequi with rice and chicken is an especially popular preparation.

Pequi pulp will tarnish silver cutlery and, if eaten raw, the fruit is best enjoyed out of hand. Care must be taken to gently scrape the pulp off the pit using one’s teeth: The spines can detach and hurt the mouth, causing considerable pain and being difficult to remove. It can be extremely dangerous to eat – not because it is poisonous or toxic, but because it can seriously damage the unwary eater’s tongue, gums and upper palate. It’s one scary fruit!

Not a fruit I would take the chance to eat…

Piccalilli:

Also known as mustard pickle it is a British version of South Asian pickles…

Pili:

Pili nuts are a rich buttery tasting nut grown in the volcanic soil of the Philippine peninsula. Pili nuts are high in calcium, phosphorus, potassium, and rich in protein.

Ramantchi:

Is a type of plum also known as Governor’s plum, Madagascar Plum, Indian Plum…a small edible fruit which can be eaten raw, made into preserves/jam or fermented and made into a wine…it also has numerous health benefits…the leaves and roots are used in herbal medicines as a treatment for snakebite… the bark is also believed to be effective for arthritis.

Rosti:

Rosti is a Swiss potato dish made with grated potato best described as a cross between hash browns and a potato pancake. It is popular throughout Switzerland. It’s cut into wedges and served with sausages or other meats and cheeses.

Vermicelli:

Or little worms…here in Thailand they are very thin rice noodles and used in soups, stir-fries and salads…in Italy, I am told they are thicker noodles…These translucent white noodles are a great alternative to wheat noodles especially for those on a gluten-free diet.

prawns with glass noodles

Easy to prepare as they need no cooking just soak in boiling water for about 5 mins depending on the size of the noodles then use as required.

Yang mei:

Tasting like a strawberry and blackberry combined this little red berry is also known as waxberry, China Bayberry or Red Bayberry this fruit has a short season and the bush only fruits once a year which makes it a very special treat …the fruit is slightly sweet, slightly tangy and floral.

That’s all for today I hope you have found something interesting…

Stay safe, have fun and laugh a lot as you know what I am going to say it is Free and proven to be good for your health…..Laughter aside…My thoughts and prayers are with all the people who have been or will be touched by this Covid-19 virus…the new lockdowns and restrictions..stay safe be aware and social isolate where required and we will beat this thing…xx

About Carol Taylor:

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and wellbeing.

The environment is also something I am passionate about and although there are now no regular columns on my blog this year. It is important that we are mindful of the world we live in…We all need to be aware of our home’s carbon footprints…where does our food come from? How far does it travel…Simple to do but if we all did it…Not only would we support local businesses but reduce our carbon footprint…

green foot prints eco system

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…….Then, I will be happy!

Thank you once again for reading this post  …I see some of you have early snow it looks so pretty xx

 

 

The Culinary Alphabet with a twist…The letter H (noocH)

Good morning everyone and Pete… time for another post which is this crazy idea from one of my fellow scribes …but food fun…I have left out squash as It has mentioned in a few previous posts…

Blanch:

A cooking process whereby food, usually a vegetable or fruit, is scalded in boiling water, removed after a brief, timed interval, and finally plunged into iced water or placed under cold running water to halt the cooking process.

Blowtorch: ( Culinary)

Think Creme Brulee with that lovely crackle on top…think meringues with just a touch of brown, think a lovely sear on your meat or fish without drying up the flesh, think skinning your peppers and tomatoes if you are running out of time…you can even heat up your knife to cut frozen meat…

Bortsch:

Hot or cold Borsch is a lovely thing I was taught how to make it by my Russian neighbour when I lived in Phuket they also taught me the correct way to make and drink a Bloody Mary the Russian way….hmmmm…that certainly involved less tomato juice and more Vodka…

Butterscotch:

Butterscotch is a type of soft-crack sweet created by slowly heating butter and brown sugar together. Just like caramel, the brown sugar molecules break down and, thanks to the addition of molasses in the sugar, caramelize into a richer, deeper flavour than classic caramel.

Butterscotch is cooked at a lower temperature which means as sweets/candy is is not quite as brittle as toffee if making a butterscotch pudding which used be one of my favourites as a child and writing this I am thinking that maybe I should recreate my mother’s pudding it also can make a lovely drizzle over ice cream or cheesecakes or it is lovely stirred into a biscuit/cookie mix…

To create a sauce, topping, or candy, additional ingredients like vanilla, salt, and cream can be added once caramelization has occurred.

Cheesecloth:

Cheesecloth is gauze-like, woven cotton cloth. Its original purpose was for making and wrapping homemade cheese, but it has become a useful tool in other recipes as well. It is used as a strainer when a fine sieve is needed, as a cover for roast turkey or chicken to keep the bird moist, and is made into little pouches for herbs for seasoning meats, broth, soups, and other dishes. Cheesecloth is something we may not often have in our kitchen. If you don’t have any on hand, luckily there are plenty of alternatives. Just make sure the item is clean before cooking.

If you don’t have cheesecloth you can use a coffee filter, a mesh bag, a fine wire sieve I have even heard of chefs using pantyhose…as long as it is fine almost any cotton fabric will do…luckily it is one item I can easily obtain here.

Cornstarch:

Is a popular thickener although I prefer to use Arrowroot, rice flour or tapioca flour…potato water can also be used as a thickener. Cornstarch is mostly flavorless, and thus adds texture rather than taste. It’s a bland powder that’s usually used to thicken dishes. However, Cornstarch is considered a refined carb, meaning that it has undergone extensive processing and been stripped of its nutrients.

Eggwash:

Is a mixture of beaten egg and liquid (usually water or milk) that is brushed onto baked goods like pastries before baking. It adds shine and color and helps to seal up edges.

It is also one of the simplest jobs which children love to do in the kitchen…

Ghivech:

A Romanian vegetable stew …A mixed vegetable stew with lots of herbs.

Goulash:

A Hungarian stew or soup of meat and vegetables flavoured with paprika thick and hearty it dates back to medieval times. One of Hungary’s National Dishes. Sometimes served with sour cream and always with crusty bread, it was originally a dush eaten by shepherds.

 

Horseradish:

Spicy and an excellent accompaniment to beef…Love it or hate it Horseradish is a wonderful accompaniment to beef and beets. For some lovely recipes see my cookery column on Smorgasbord.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2018/04/25/smorgasbord-blog-magazine-the-food-and-cookery-column-with-carol-taylor-horseradish/

Hooch:

Hooch, a colloquial term for an alcoholic distilled beverage. Moonshine, illicitly distilled spirits.

Murgh:

Is the name for chicken…who hasn’t loved the chicken Murgh on an Indian restaurant menu…

Nooch:

This was a new one for me I have heard not tried Nutritional Yeast and Nooch is short for nutritional yeast. Nutritional yeast is deactivated yeast and can be bought in the form of powder or flakes. It is often used for vegan sauces because of its super cheesy taste. Nutritional yeast is something that should not be missed in a vegan household.

Peach:

Who doesn’t love a nice juicy peach they can be eaten raw, made into a beautiful dessert, or grilled with olive oil, fresh thyme, black pepper, and basil they are a wonderful thing…

Radish:

The root of a member of the mustard family, radishes have a peppery flavour and a crisp, crunchy texture. Among the most popular varieties is the small, cherry-sized common variety which has red skin and white flesh (the French Breakfast radish is a variation on this type, and has an elongated shape with a deep pink skin that fades to white at the roots).

You can also find black radishes, popular in eastern Europe, which are more strongly flavoured, as well as large white mooli or daikon radishes, which are shaped like carrots. They are popular in Asian cookery and have a very mild flavour.

Radishes are rich in folic acid and potassium and are a good source of vitamin B6, magnesium, riboflavin, and calcium.

Redbush:

Is one of my favourite teas…also commonly known as Rooibos it is low in tannin and is caffeine-free.

Saltbush:

From red bush to Saltbush which is a lovely native vegetable salty and herby they can be blanched, sautéed, wrapped around meat or fish, used in salads, or for stuffing poultry. Alternatively, they may be dried and used as a herb or sprinkle.

Sourdough:

Sourdough bread is a lovely thing and it said that many people are cultivating their sourdough culture due to their quarantine which is good as it makes lovely bread and even the discard can be used in many ways like pancakes for example…It took me a few goes before I got mine properly started but I learnt a lot about flour and its differences which has improved my baking.

Spinach:

Loaded with nutrients and antioxidants Spinach is classed as a very healthy vegetable…and we all remember Popeye and the now-iconic ads. It can be eaten raw in salads, lightly sauteed in butter or olive oil…Serve it wilted in pasta or in an omelette or quiche…a very versatile dark green leafy vegetable…Our families favourite recipe using spinach is this spicy green chicken recipe…

Succotash:

Succotash is a culinary dish consisting primarily of sweet corn with lima beans or other shell beans. Other ingredients may be added including corned beef, potatoes, turnips, salt pork, tomatoes, multi-coloured sweet peppers, and okra.

Tabbouleh:

Tabouli salad or Tabbouleh is a simple Mediterranean salad of very finely chopped vegetables, lots of fresh parsley and bulgur wheat, …

Tempeh:

Made from fermented soya beans it is a traditional Indonesian product ..a plant-based protein source..not something I have used or tried have you?

Waterbath:

What is it..put simply it is a pan of water put in your oven and used to cook cheesecakes(it stops) then cracking…creme caramel, baked custard anything which requires a slow even cooking …

Just a tip: If you use a springform pan for a recipe that calls for a water bath, wrap the pan first with aluminum foil to prevent water from leaking through the bottom. Use two or three sheets in a crisscross pattern for best results.

That’s all for this week see you in two weeks for the letter I (enokI)…

Please stay safe as it seems in some places lockdowns are being introduced again…not good xx

About Carol Taylor:

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and well being.

The environment is also something I am passionate about and there will be more on this on my blog this year

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…Then, I will be happy!

Please stay safe and well and follow your governments safety guidelines remember we are all in this together xxx

 

The Culinary Alphabet with a twist…The letter F ( AperitiF)

Good morning everyone and Pete… time for another post which is this crazy idea from one of my fellow scribes …but food fun…F is another doozy…well not quite so many as last time but a few to choose from…

Aperitif…Cheers!

Something we have all partaken in at some time or another or maybe on a regular basis…an alcoholic drink taken before a meal as an appetizer is the official meaning…although that has relaxed in recent years and there are options for non-alcoholic aperitif’s whether or not they stimulate your appetite remains to be seen…It’s just lovely to sit and enjoy a drink with family or friend before a meal isn’t it?

Bay leaf…

An aromatic leaf used in cooking either fresh, dried or ground it is a staple in my store cupboard and something I use very regularly. It comes from the laurel tree is an evergreen shrub which is used to flavour soups, stews and many other dishes.

Biscoff…

Invented in Belgium in 1932 and since then, every single Biscoff cookie has been baked there, according to the exact same recipe….founded by three brothers Jan, Emiel and Henri Boone the brothers made cookies for breakfast and also speculoos for St Nicholas’ Day; they later specialised in speculoos. The original cooked contained nothing but natural ingredients which was why they were named Lotus after the flower which is the symbol of purity.

Photo by Anna Gru on Unsplash

Biscoff is now famous worldwide and coffee lovers everywhere ask for a lotus Biscoff.

Boeuf…

Quite simply it is the French for Beef…It was also the very first meal I cooked for my now husband …I made boeuf bourguignon for a man who stated he doesn’t like garlic in his food…well, he had an absolutely clean plate and a second helping I believe from memory…he now loves garlic…That was the first lesson he learnt in my kitchen…hehe…

Breadstuff…

Is any bread product…food made from a dough of flour or meal and usually raised with yeast or baking powder and then baked.

Cornbeef…

This is where the English and the Americans have a different concept of what is Corn beef…Corn beef to me is the only processed meat I eat from a tin and with which I make corn beef hash or I mash it with the potato from a baked (jacket)potato then put it back in the skin and crisp it up a little…I also love a corned beef sandwich.

The other Corned Beef is what I call salt beef and what everyone else calls corned beef although there is no corn in this particular beef the name originated from the salt used which were called corns of salt…Corned beef and cabbage is also a favourite meal of mine and a popular Irish dish…

Cream Puff…

fresh cream Jam Puff pastry

Made from puff pastry and filled with jam and cream sometimes they have iced tops and sometimes a custard filling …my mother used to make these for Sunday Tea as treat…

Decaf…

The shortened term for decaffeinated …which is where caffeine is removed from coffee beans, cocoa and tea leaves…

Duff…

A stiff flour pudding made with fruit and spices and boiled in a cloth bag or steamed…Plum Duff, Figgy Duff there are many duffs…Traditional puddings like the Christmas pudding way back in my great grandmothers time were referred to as Plum Duff or Figgy duff and probably still are in some communities.

Don’t forget it will soon be time to make our Christmas puddings and cakes…

Dwarf (Beans)…

Also known as the French bean is a small bean which grows faster than its climbing brothers and is easy to grow in pots as it doesn’t require staking…

Available pretty much all year round and a vegetable which can be cooked whole or chopped.

Greaseproof (paper)…

Something which as a cook I always have a supply handy for lining cake tins or ideal for wrapping sandwiches it is a kitchen staple…

Goldleaf…

Edible gold leaf is a gold product that can be used to decorate food. Gold is considered “biologically inert,” meaning it passes through the digestive tract without being absorbed. It is mostly used in desserts and candy making and is available in sheets and as flakes.

Photo by Charisse Kenion on Unsplash

It seems to be quite popular with TV chefs or posh restaurants and bakeries…It adds a bit of glitz and glitter.

Heatproof…

Not all dishes and pans which we use in the kitchen are heatproof…some are just serving dishes and decorative dishes…to be deemed heatproof the pan/dish has to be made from materials which can withstand either a bare flame or the heat from the oven and the same goes for handles on pans always check that they are oven proof just in case you wish to use the pan as a hob to the oven dish.

Mapleleaf…

Not something I have used in cooking but Maple leaves have been used since the 13th century in Japan…

 

Pilaf…

Originating in Turkey a Pilaf or Pilau is a rice dish cooked in stock or broth with added spices, vegetables, meat or fish. Pilaf refers to how the rice is cooked…it is first sautéed in butter or oil and then cooked in stock or broth, usually with seasoning by doing this it ensures the rice stays separated.

Stroganoff…

Originating in Russia …A stroganoff is pieces of beef cooked with sour cream until soft and tender…It is a dish famed around the world and there are many variations…it can be cooked low and slow or as I do by cooking the beef quickly, slice it and add cream, wine and mushroom sauce sometimes for a change I use Brandy…Stroganoff is also popular in Nordic countries. In Sweden, a common variant is a korv Stroganoff (sausage Stroganoff), which uses the local falukorv sausage as a substitute for the beef. In Finland, the dish is called Makara-stroganoff, Makara meaning any kind of sausage. Although Beef Stroganoff is, however, still a common dish. Diced brined pickles are also a normal ingredient in Finnish Stroganoff.

Tealeaf…

Green tea is my favourite leaf tea which when correctly brewed has none of the bitterness which often associated with green tea…Tea is an aromatic beverage commonly prepared by pouring hot or boiling water over cured or fresh leaves. After water, it is the most widely consumed drink in the world.

Wheatsheaf Loaf…

A sheaf is a tied bunch of grain stalks after they have been harvested. … Symbolically, however, the wheatsheaf represents plenty, a good harvest, fertility and even resurrection, as the cycle of seasons has once more given grain for bread…A loaf of bread shaped and decorated like a wheatsheaf is also a common sight on Harvest Festival which as a child always fascinated me …I still remember the words of ” We plough the fields and scatter the good seeds on the land” Our church was always filled with so many vegetables and these loaves afterwards boxes were distributed to the elderly and infirm…This video reminds me of that wheatsheaf loaf of my childhood…

That’s all for this week see you in two weeks for the letter G (juG)…

Please stay safe as it seems in some places lockdowns are being introduced again…not good xx

About Carol Taylor:

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and well being.

The environment is also something I am passionate about and there will be more on this on my blog this year

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…Then, I will be happy!

Please stay safe and well and follow your governments safety guidelines remember we are all in this together xxx

 

 

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