Category Archives: The Culinary Alphabet

The Culinary Alphabet…A-Z…The Middle Letter Q…Duqqa…

 

Welcome to series 3 of the Culinary Alphabet A-Z…Where the middle letter is Q…

So what’s in store? In this series the A, B, C, etc will be the middle letter, for example, Jarlsberg, Korma, Apple and Tursu a variety of Turkish pickled vegetables… how easy that will be who knows I am sure some of the letters of the alphabet could cause the grey matter to rebel or implode…haha…I also don’t want to use plurals to form a word as I may need that word for another letter and its sort of cheating I think…unless of course I really get stuck…which I am sure will happen…Q is not so easy only a few but I am going to let them stand on their own to give the grey matter a bit of a break…

Today it is words where the middle letter is Q.

Let’s go and see what I have found…

Bouquet Garni…

Bouquet garni, French for “garnished bouquet,” is a classic herb mixture used for preparing stocks, soups, casseroles, meats, and vegetables. The traditional combination is parsley, thyme, and bay leaf, but you may also find recipes that include other herbs such as rosemary, basil, chervil, peppercorns, and tarragon.

You can make bouquet garni with fresh or dried herbs. If the herbs are fresh, the combination is secured with a bit of cooking twine for retrieval, while cheesecloth is generally used to wrap dried herbs. The bundle is secured with twine to keep the herbs enclosed.

Duqqa…

Duqqa is an Egyptian blend of herbs, toasted nuts, and spices such as cumin, sesame seeds, and coriander. The combination of these ingredients is ground into a coarse powder which can be used as a salad topping, a dip with olive oil and bread, or as a seasoning.

Its name is derived from the Egyptian Arabic word for to crush or to pound, referring to the method of production. Duqqa originated as peasant food and people mostly consumed it as a seasoning for bread. Due to its high protein and fat content, it provided sustenance throughout the day.

The blend has recently taken off in Australia, where it is consumed on its own, as a bar snack.

Kumquat…Kumquats(Cumquat) are a citrus fruit with an unexpected property: the orange peel is perfectly edible after washing. The small fruits, 3 to 4 cm in size, most resemble mini oranges. The taste is also similar: spicy, a little bit sour to sweet.

Not much bigger than a grape, yet this bite-sized fruit fills your mouth with a big burst of sweet-tart citrus flavour. In Chinese, kumquat means “golden orange.”

They were originally grown in China. Now they’re also grown in several other countries, including warmer areas of the United States, such as Florida and California.

Kumquats are especially notable for their rich supply of vitamin C and fibre. In fact, you get more fibre in a serving of them than most other fresh fruits…

Ramequins…Small dishes also spelt ramekin that are used for so many culinary purposes…I use my Ramquins more than any of my other dishes they are such a handy size when meal prepping or for holding small amounts of pickles etc.

They are also commonly used for egg dishes like creme brulee or individual souffles…Traditionally circular with a fluted exterior, ramequins can also be found in novelty shapes like flowers, hearts, and stars.

Ramequins are usually designed to resist high temperatures, as they are frequently used in ovens or, in the case of crème brûlée, exposed to the flame of a cooking torch.

Caqui Fruit…also known as Persimmon Fruit…

Sometimes also called the Sharon Fruit the Caqui fruit also is high in beta carotene and minerals such as sodium, magnesium, calcium and iron, and studies have found that they also contain twice as much dietary fibre per 100g as apples, plus more of the phenolic compounds thought to ward off heart disease.

For further information on how to eat this lovely fruit and its benefits follow this link it is easy to see why this fruits popularity has soared over recent years.

Bisques…are smooth, creamy, highly seasoned soups of French origin, classically based on a strained broth of crustaceans. It can be made from lobster, langoustine, crab, shrimp, or crayfish. Alongside chowder, bisques are one of the most popular seafood soups.

We love a seafood bisque and I always save my fish heads, Prawn heads in a pot in the freezer until I have enough to make a seafood stock or a shrimp/prawn stock it is amazing how that stock lifts a bisque or a paella to another level and its less waste…

What is seafood stock made of?
Making a good homemade seafood stock takes a few basic aromatics, white wine and seafood
shells…like shrimp shells, lobster shells, crab shells and fish bones…some good olive oil, onions,
garlic bay leaves, black peppercorns it can be simple or as complex as you like…
Just add your shrimp shells and heads or other shells drizzle with olive oil add onions or
garlic..onions skins are good as they help add a great colour… heat and stir for about 10 mins
and then  add some water or wine and cook slowly for about  25 minutes and then pass
through a sieve  making sure you press them shells to get every last drop of goodness from
them and you  should have beautiful orange coloured stock to use as a base for your bisques,
chowder,  risottos, paella you can use immediately, freeze in ice cube trays or measured
portions…

That’s all for the letter Q…Thank you for joining me today I hope you have found something new and some of your favourites…in two weeks it will be the letter R, for example, Tursu and Korma…xx

Until tomorrow, where I will be back in my kitchen cooking from scratch, have a lovely day xx

 

CarolCooks2 weekly roundup…October 3rd-October 9th 2021…Culinary A-Z, Shoes, Music with Dido and Yeast Free Raisin Bread…

My Culinary A-Z, Music from Dido and Elvis…in the US it’s National Pumpkin and Apple month…From Carol’s Green Kitchen…Yeast Free Raisin Bread…

Welcome to the round-up of posts you might have missed this week on CarolCooks2… 

Time is marching on we have now nearly two weeks into October…the month for Halloween Festivities… where the last of the summer sun for some of us is on the wane and where for others spring has sprung…Soups and salads are on the tables around the world…for some, the leaves are starting to turn into glorious shades of oranges and reds elsewhere the spring bulbs and beautiful flowers are unfurling their leaves and petals both showing how beautiful this world is in its changes of seasons…

Did you know that in October…?

In the Northern Hemisphere, October happens in Autumn (fall) but in the Southern Hemisphere, October falls in spring! For each hemisphere, October is in the same season that April is in for the other hemisphere.

The night sky is much clearer in October so it is the perfect time to go stargazing.

In October 1884, the time zones of the world were created. This was based on the Greenwich Meridian time zone, which helps us understand time zones.

Music on 10/10/1963…#1 Brian Poole and the Tremeloes…

I can’t remember when I last listened to this but love it!… Have bopped away many, many times to this…

Enough of my twittering let’s see what posts I had for you last week just in case you need to catch up…

A beautiful pumpkin soup to kick of the start of National Pumpkin Month in the USA.

One of my favourite vegetable soups…it is just as tasty without the prawns or crabmeat just with the fresh herbs and crispy garlic it is still a delicious bowl of soup…

CarolCooks2…National Pumpkin Month…Thai Pumpkin Soup with prawns or crab meat.

The next letter in my culinary Alphabet with a twist where the middle letter was P…very apt as both are celebrating by having National Pumpkin Month and National Apple Month the middle in both Apple and Pumpkin is P…which means I have lots more Pumpkin and Apple Recipes to share with you this month.

The Culinary Alphabet…A-Z…The Letter P…

Wednesday I was over at Smorgasbord Magazine with my monthly Green Kitchen where I review any new products I try in my home and this week I shared a yeast-free raisin bread recipe and very yummy it was…

Smorgasbord Food Column – Carol Taylor’s Green Kitchen – October 2021 – Yeast Free Raisin and Cinnamon bread, Hair Conditioner, Fabric softener, World Food Day

Still on the subject of food…Sally over at Smorgasbord is republishing by popular demand and very useful it is shopping by nutrient List…A fabulous idea as if there are certain deficiencies in our diets then Sally has identified the foods which contain these nutrients which makes shopping so much easier…Plus at the end of the series, she will be adding a printed list so all you have to do is print it off or save it to your phone, tick that list and shop…How cool is that?

Smorgasbord Health Column – Weekly Grocery Shopping List by Nutrient – Part One – Vitamins A – B by Sally Cronin

Saturday Snippets is one of my fun posts to write this week the one prompt was “Shoes“…sent to me by Jennie( A teacher’s Reflections)…I had fun finding out connections to shoes that you couldn’t dream of …plus some brilliant musical connections like Depeche Mode and one connection to your Lady Liberty…who knew? You will when you head over and read the post…

Saturday Snippets 9th October 2021…Fun Facts and music with Shoes…

Thank you for joining me for the weekly roundup I hope to see you next week where I have more recipes and some environmental A -Z and of course, at the end of the week it’s Saturday again with a one-word prompt…Have a great week xx

 

 

 

The Culinary Alphabet…A-Z…The Letter P…

Welcome to series 3 of the Culinary Alphabet A-Z…Where the middle letter is P

So what’s in store? In this series the A, B, C, etc will be the middle letter, for example, Jarlsberg, Korma, Apple and Tursu a variety of Turkish pickled vegetables… how easy that will be who knows I am sure some of the letters of the alphabet could cause the grey matter to rebel or implode…haha…I also don’t want to use plurals to form a word as I may need that word for another letter and it’s sort of cheating I think…unless of course I really get stuck…which I am sure will happen…P is not so easy as some but I’m sure it will get harder as we near the end of the alphabet…

Today it is words where the middle letter is P.

Let’s go and see what I have found…

Apple…It also happens to be National Apple Month in the US…Apples... I think most of us took it for granted that we always had a fruit bowl full of apples to grab as we passed by on our way to school or work or even had an old gnarled apple tree in our gardens…

 

We all looked forward to the apple harvest when our mothers and grandmothers canned them, pureed them, made pies and puddings with them…we did Apple bobbing on Halloween … our mums made toffee apples of which I can still conjure up the taste in my imagination…the stuff of dreams and memories…

Aspic…Aspic is savoury meat gelatin made from consommé, clarified stock, or bone broth. It gets its jiggly texture when the consommé cools…aspic jelly brings back memories of my grandmother and although I wasn’t a fussy child and ate almost everything aspic jelly I could not stand it…I hated it…it’s been around since the 1300s and I think it should have stayed there …it is suitable for vegetarians if you avoid using gelatin…

Aspic is used to set foods into a mould. The moulded foods could be meats, vegetables, or eggs. The aspic mould is chilled, sliced, and served.

Antipasto…Antipasto means “before the meal.”  Typically, this dish would be served on special occasions or during the holidays. In rural Italy years ago every family had a pig, which was killed each year so that different cuts of cured meat would be available in the larder (pantry). The family also made numerous jars of preserved vegetables and their own cheese. All this produce would be carefully assembled to be enjoyed as an antipasto or starter.”

An antipasto platter is a delicious combination of cheeses, vegetables and meats, usually served with good wines. It’s a great way to start an evening with friends and is very easy to put together.

Caper…Capers are something I came to love in later life when I realised just what difference they made to some recipes…they are the small flower buds of the Capparis shrub that grows in the Mediterranean. As they’re picked by hand, they’re fairly pricey, but they’re a versatile storecupboard ingredient that’s ideal for adding a distinctive sour/salty flavour to many savoury dishes.

Capon…Ahhhhh…my mother always served a Capon at Christmas I have now discovered what a capon really is…suffice to say I will not be eating or cooking another capon…Caponization can be done by surgically removing the bird’s testes, or may also be accomplished through the use of estrogen implants. With either method, the male sex hormones normally present are no longer effective…it seems that if surgically done anyone can do it, unlike cats and dogs who have to be done by a qualified veterinary person…secondly I don’t wish to eat anything which has had estrogen implants…

Champagne…I love a glass of champagne…it is also said that 3 glasses a day keeps the doctor away…apparently, the results of the research were dramatic and tests are to be carried out on 60 pensioners who will be asked to drink champagne for three years…I missed that one ladies some of you kept that quiet…lol

Chapati…is an unleavened flatbread originating from the Indian subcontinent…Chapatis are made of whole-wheat flour known as atta, mixed into a dough with water, oil and optional salt in a mixing utensil called a parat, and are cooked on a tava (flat skillet).

Crampfish…commonly called torpedo fish it can shock humans but the common torpedo fish is edible…not sure I would want to try it… have you?

Maple Syrup…In addition to being free from artificial additives or sweeteners, pure maple syrup boasts many nutritional benefits and contains up to 24 different antioxidants. It is rich in vitamins and minerals such as manganese, calcium, potassium, magnesium, zinc, copper, riboflavin, phosphorus and iron.

Not only is maple syrup delicious on pancakes…it is lovely brushed over bacon while it is cooking, whisked into a salad dressing, drizzling over your roasted veggies while they are cooking. making maple butter and maple mustard is divine so many uses for this healthy syrup.

Peppers…from mild to smoking hot peppers can tantalise our taste buds…Peppers thrive in the summertime when they can soak up the heat and enjoy dry weather. They like to live in heat, produce heat, and bring the heat to our kitchens. They can be eaten raw, cooked, roasted, canned and pickled…they can be used in sweet and savoury dishes…think chilli and chocolate or jalapeno poppers…

Pumpkin…It’s National Pumpkin month in the USA…Pumpkins are a huge part of American culture, so much that every year about 655,765 US tons of them are produced. They’re great for tossing contests, carving contests, and Halloween decorations. Pumpkins are also good for your health? Full of vitamins and minerals like Potassium, beta carotene and antioxidants they are low in fat and sugar and full of fibre…

Pumpkins come in all sizes and colours some are absolutely huge and others like these are quite small in comparison but hollowed out they make lovely bowls for soup…

Saltpetre…Saltpetre (Potassium/Sodium Nitrate ) is used as an ingredient for curing meats and to give the characteristic pink colour to bacon and hams. Can be used either for dry curing or as a brine solution. Salt brining does not kill all bacteria but it is a proven fact that overconsumption of processed meats can cause cancer…I use saltpetre when brining my ham and bacon However we do not consume anywhere near the recommended guidelines for ham/bacon and I made the conscious decision that for the amount and frequency that I used and we ate bacon/ham it was far better than not using and take the chance of contracting botulism which is a very real and deadly consequence of not brining meat correctly…this is my opinion on why I use it.

Snapper…White, red, grey or black the snapper is a beautiful fish…salt-crusted or steamed with lots of herbs …a beautiful white-fleshed fish high in Omega 3 fatty acids.

Strapacky…Strapacky(Slovakia) or Sztrapacska (Hungary) is a boiled potato dumpling dish with sour cabbage and onion with fried bacon and fresh chives.

Tempura…a popular light Japanese batter for fish/meat or vegetables …

This light crispy batter complements prawns/shrimp perfectly as well as beautiful tempura vegetables.

That’s all for the letter P…Thank you for joining me today I hope you have found something new and some of your favourites…in two weeks it will be the letter Q, for example, Bisques and Bouquet Garni…xx

Until tomorrow, where I will be back in my kitchen cooking from scratch, have a lovely day xx

 

The Culinary Alphabet …..A-Z…Series 3… the letter L…Jelly or Jello?

Welcome to series 3 of the Culinary Alphabet A-Z…Where the middle letter is L…

Nothing is as it seems here…this new series is the brainchild of Chel Owens who writes at A wife, My Verse, and Every Little Thingmy followers are so good to me they think up all sorts of permutations of the Alphabet for me to blog about…not sure if they want me to call it quits or what they will come up with next…Chel like Pete was, however, will be called on to make her contribution every two weeks…they don’t get off scot-free…so I hope you have started brainstorming Chel…haha x

So what’s in store? In this series the A, B, C, etc will be the middle letter, for example, Cajun, Cabbage, Ackee and Yucca… how easy that will be who knows I am sure some of the letters of the alphabet could cause the grey matter to rebel or implode…haha…I also don’t want to use plurals to form a word as I may need that word for another letter and it’s sort of cheating I think…unless of course I really get stuck…which I am sure will happen…

Today it is words where the middle letter is L...A little easier than J which was quite difficult… What kiddie big or little doesn’t love Jello or Jelly…yes I know before you tell me you call jelly… jam…Jelly to me (a Brit) is what you call Jello although I prefer Jelly as it is not so sweet and has more of a fruity taste than Jello plus for a treat my mum would give me a square of the jelly when she was making it…you can’t do that with Jello its a powder…or we could take Potluck and see what was cooking on the Skillet…to eat with our Salad.

Let’s go and see what I have found…

Abalone…

Marine snails…Abalone is a large species of snail found in temperate water environments in several areas around the world. They occur in Kelp forests and rocky reefs and play a very important role in the marine ecosystem helping stabilize these marine habitats in terms of community structure. Large declines in Abalone populations are altering the coastlines around the world.

Baklava…

One of my favourites..my first taste of Baklava was when my sister visited Iran and brought me back a box… I have since made my own and absolutely love it …It is crispy, syrupy has nuts and is just a delicious bite of heaven.

Bellini…

A Bellini is a cocktail made with Prosecco and peach purée or nectar. It originated in Venice, Italy.

Caldo Verde…

A simple soup that contains shredded kale, onions, potatoes, garlic, and chouriço. It originates from the North of Portugal, but it’s served all over the country. It’s also listed as one of the 7 wonders of Portuguese gastronomy.

Challah…

Challah is a Kosher loaf of braided bread. The simple dough is made with eggs, water, flour, yeast and salt. The bread is typically pale yellow in colour because so many eggs are used, and it has a rich flavour, too. Some challah recipes call for inclusions like raisins, honey or seeds.

Collard Greens…

Collard greens—or just “collards”—are a member of the cabbage (Brassica) family of vegetables, which means they are cruciferous vegetables. Their dark green pigment is a signal they contain nutritious antioxidants. Collards are also an excellent source of many vitamins and minerals, including calcium. You can use them as you would any dark leafy greens, like kale or spinach.

Dumplings…

Dumpling is a broad class of dishes that consist of pieces of dough (made from a variety of starch sources) wrapped around a filling, or of dough with no filling. The dough can be based on bread, flour or potatoes, and maybe filled with meat, fish, cheese, vegetables, fruits or sweets.

Goulash…

Goulash is a soup or stew of meat and vegetables seasoned with paprika and other spices. Originating in Hungary, goulash is a common meal predominantly eaten in Central Europe but also in other parts of Europe. It is one of the national dishes of Hungary and a symbol of the country.

Involtini…

Involtini is an Italian word for various small bites of food consisting of some sort of outer
layer wrapped around a filling.
Involtini can be made with a wrapper of meat, poultry,
seafood, or vegetables, with fillings like cheese, vegetables, cured meats, and nuts.

Melon…

Melon, (Cucumis melo), a trailing vine in the gourd family (Cucurbitaceae), is grown for its often musky-scented edible fruit. The melon plant is native to central Asia, and its many cultivated varieties are widely grown in warm regions around the world. Most commercially important melons are sweet and eaten fresh, though some varieties can be made into preserves or pickled.

Mollusc…

The mollusc shell is typically a calcareous exoskeleton that encloses, supports and protects the soft parts of an animal in the phylum Mollusca, which includes snails, clams, tusk shells, and several other classes. Not all shelled molluscs live in the sea; many live on the land and in freshwater.

Pavlova…

 

Both meringue and pavlova are egg white desserts, and are made in a similar way. … However, meringue is crispy and dry throughout, while pavlova is crispy on the outside, but fluffy, soft and marshmallow-like on the inside. So a pavlova is a meringue-based dessert, but not a classic meringue..aptly .named after the Russian ballerina Anna Pavlova.

Pilaf…

A Middle Eastern or Indian dish of rice (or sometimes wheat) cooked in stock with spices,
typically having added meat or vegetables.

Pollack…

Or Pollock are found from Norway all the way down to Portugal and are abundant in British coastal waters. They live on or near the seabed and live a sedentary life, feeding on crustaceans and small fish.

Praline…

Confectionary made of nuts and sugar often almonds and hazelnuts …or pecans.

Ribollita.

 

This Tuscan stew was created when servants would clear the plates of their masters and cook the leftovers in boiling water. Ribollita, which means re-boiled, is made with cannellini beans and hearty vegetables and thickened with stale bread.

Salsa…

Who doesn’t love a nice fresh salsa…vibrant it can be as spicy as you like…it can be used as a topping or as a condiment …The origin of salsa made from chopped tomatoes goes back to a time when Central America was home to the Aztecs, Incas, and Mayans. It was likely all these cultures ate salsa in some form, but the Aztec diet was documented in more detail, so they are often credited with inventing it.

My favourite is  Mango and avocado with red onion.

Ingredients:

  • 1 mango, diced
  • 1 medium avocado, diced
  • ½ medium red onion, finely chopped
  • ½ bunch fresh coriander (about 1/2 cup chopped)
  • Juice of 1 medium lime (about 2tbsp)
  • 1/4 tsp salt and a pinch of black pepper, to taste
  • 1 red chilli finely sliced (optional)

Let’s Cook!

In a medium bowl, combine diced mango, avocado, finely chopped red onion, and chopped coriander. If you like a hint of spice like me then add chopped chilli.

Squeeze 2tbsp of fresh lime juice over the top and sprinkle with salt and pepper to taste. Toss gently to combine and serve. If not serving right away, cover and refrigerate.

Scallop…

Scallops are a type of bivalve mollusc, meaning the interior muscle is surrounded by two shells similarly to oysters, mussels, and clams. Inside the shell, scallops have a white adductor muscle (the part we eat) that opens and closes the shell, as well as a bright orange section called the coral.

Stilton…

Stilton is a beautiful English cheese…streaked like marble with a beautiful almost soft crumbly texture. The art of making Stilton has remained very much the same as when it was first produced. Only made in certain parts of England, the production relies on careful selection and maturing.

A cheeseboard wouldn’t be the same without a lovely piece of Stilton paired with some honey, walnuts and sliced apple however it is equally at home with pasta and risotto or crumbled over a salad…one of my fathers favourite cheeses.

Sunflower Seeds…

Sunflowers aren’t just pretty to look at. They also provide a nutritious fruit known botanically as sunflower kernels. Most people call the kernels “seeds.”

Sunflower kernels are encased in edible, black and white, pin-striped hulls. They are a popular snack.

Thank you so much for joining me today…L wasn’t quite so hard once I got going… NEXT time it’s the letter M for Lemon, Limes or maybe a Formosa…x

See you tomorrow where I am in my kitchen  …..x

The Culinary Alphabet …..Series 3… the letter B…

Welcome to series 3 of the Culinary Alphabet…letter B…

Nothing is as it seems here…this new series is the brainchild of Chel Owens who writes at A wife, My Verse, and Every Little Thing…my followers are so good to me they think up all sorts of permutations of the Alphabet…not sure if they want me to call it quits or what they will come up with next…Chel like Pete, however, will be called on to make her contribution every two weeks…they don’t get off scot-free…haha

So what’s in store? In this series the A, B, C, etc will be the middle letter, for example, Brawn, Cabbage, and Yucca… how easy that will be who knows I am sure  some of the letters of the alphabet could cause the grey matter to rebel or implode…haha

Barmbrack:

Barmbrack is an Irish bread traditionally made from the froth or “barm” leftover after fermenting beer or ale, which is mixed with sultanas and spice to make a heavy, fruity bread. And while brack is eaten all year round, it is only at Halloween that symbolic additions are made to the mix, each with a supposed fortune-telling significance for the year ahead.

The Irish term for this, Bairín Breac, means ‘speckled bread’ indicating that the fruit was scarce in the loaf. The Druidic tradition is represented by the inclusion of charms in the bread, meant to indicate the fortune of the recipient.

There were a few traditional charms: a ring, a coin, a pea, and a piece of fabric.

  • A pea, a dried pea, the person would not marry
  • A piece of cloth, the person would have bad luck or would be poor
  • A coin, would enjoy good fortune or be rich
  • A ring, the person would be married within the year

The person who got the ring was meant to place it under his or her pillow when they would dream of the person they would marry! The ring is still included in a barmbrack today, though I think it is now regarded as just a little bit of fun.

Blueberry:

With over 400 different species, the berries come in a range of colours red, black, purple, white, and yellow. The tart taste will be more or prominent in some varieties than others…other examples are raspberry and cranberry whose middle letter is  B…

All 3 of these berries have numerous proven health benefits and can be eaten raw or cooked, juiced or in smoothies, made into jams or jellies they pair well with both meat and fish.

Buckbeans:

Also commonly known as Bogbean, or Marsh Trefoil. It grows on marshy grown or on the edges of ponds in the shallow water.

It is edible but in moderation and with some care it is also used in traditional medicines.

The Root can be eaten cooked not raw but having a very bitter taste it must be treated to get rid of the acrid taste This can be done by drying the root, grinding it into a powder and then washing it in running water, unfortunately, this treatment will also get rid of many of the vitamins and minerals contained in the root.

The powder can be used for making ‘missen bread’ (famine bread)…bread which was made many, many years ago when farmers had nothing to eat and food was scarce the powder was mixed with flour to make this bread.

The intensely bitter leaves are used as a substitute for hops in making beer.

Cabbage:

Cabbage is a leafy green, red, or white biennial plant grown as an annual vegetable crop for its dense-leaved heads…It can be eaten raw or cooked…

Here is eaten both raw and salted as an accompaniment to many dishes… we eat it raw with sticky rice and chicken or fish where it can be wrapped around the rice and meat to make a tasty bite…

One of my favourite vegetables especially spiced red cabbage is packed with nutrients and low in calories or it can be shredded and used in slaws…it doesn’t end there it can be sauteed, added to stir-fries used as a wrap…Kimchi and sauerkraut…Yes, please are both plentiful here and used as sides with rice dishes…or just salted and fermented it is one of Lily’s favourites she eats it like sweets…

Thai Pickled Cabbage ( Pak Dong)

SAM_6824

  • 1 white cabbage. cut or torn into pieces.
  • 8 large spring onions chopped
  • Coarse Salt.

Pickled cabbage is very easy to do and there are many variations I have seen with fresh chillies. It can also be made with Chinese cabbage or Pak Choy…Our preference is just plain old white cabbage and spring onions it is quick, easy and very moreish it can be eaten on its own, stirred into soup or with a curry as an accompaniment. It doesn’t last long here at all as our little granddaughter loves it and just eats it on its own.

To Pickle:

Layer Cabbage, Onions and salt in the dish add a little water. Mix it all together with your hands.

We then leave the dish covered on the kitchen top or in the sun for 1 day.

Then drain and lightly rinse and add more salt if required. Cover and leave for 2/3 days or until it reaches your ideal taste. With pickled cabbage, it is purely down to personal taste some like it saltier than others. Just play with it and you will soon discover your ideal version.

Then refrigerate and enjoy!

Chablis:

Chablis wines are dry white wines that are characterized by their purity, crispness, sophistication and minerality… a beautiful wine.

Cheeseburgers:

Not something I eat often but when I do I generally enjoy a cheeseburger…

Cobbler:

Cobblers are a fruit dessert baked with biscuit-style topping. It’s called a cobbler because its top crust is not smooth like a pie crust but rather “cobbled” and coarse. It’s usually dropped or spooned over the fruit, then baked.

Flatbread:

Ehyptian-lamb-flatbreads

Easy to make and quick to cook I make flatbreads quite a lot either as an accompaniment to a curry or stuffed and rolled as in my Egyptian Flatbreads which are delicious.

Kebab:

Kebabs are varying types of cooked meats with their origins in Middle Eastern Cuisine…the meat can be cubed and cooked on a stick, it can be minced and shaped into an oval and grilled or rolled around a wooden skewer or a stem of lemongrass it can also be cooked as a whole on a vertical rotisserie and then sliced off and mixed with a variety of fillings inside a pitta bread or tortilla type bread…All delicious but calorific…

Meatballs:

As the name suggests balls of meat or fish but then they are fishballs…Made of ground meat and spices meatballs are cooked by frying, baking, steaming or braising in sauce either tomato or a brown bbq sauce…One of our favourites are these Swedish Meatballs

Parboil:

To parboil is to boil food, usually vegetables, briefly and lightly…For example, I parboil potatoes prior to roasting or making chips(fries)…vegetables like parsnips and turnips may be parboiled before roasting…it speeds up the cooking and makes for a crispier outer and who doesn’t love crispy roasties…

Rehoboams:

Is a champagne bottle size…36 glasses to be precise… 4.5-litres  named after the son of King Solomon and grandson of King David, who ruled the Kingdom of Judah in the 10th century BC.

Rhubarb:

Beautiful fleshy, edible stalks which make a lovely pie or crumble and also pair well in savoury dishes…the leaves however SHOULD not be eaten as they are highly toxic …very high in oxalic acid, which quickly causes kidney failure in humans. …

About 25 grams of pure oxalic acid is the average amount needed to kill a human. That said, rhubarb leaves aren’t pure oxalic acid, and it would take around 11 pounds of the leaves to secure that much. But still! I’d stay away.

Ribes:

Ribes is a genus of about 200 known species of flowering plants native throughout the temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere. The various species are known as currants or gooseberries, and some are cultivated for their edible fruit or as ornamental plants.

Rutabagas:

It is only in recent years that I knew that the vegetable I have always called swede is also known as rutabagas…it is a root vegetable which belongs to the cabbage family…with yellow or purple skin they can have white to yellow flesh and are much denser than the turnip. High in fibre, potassium and Vitamin C…

How to eat?…

  • Add rutabagas to soups, stews and casseroles, or puree with mashed potatoes.
  • Eat rutabagas raw as a snack or grate into salads and slaws. Slice and bake like French fries.
  • Rutabagas can be combined with carrots, potatoes, turnips and other root vegetables for a healthy stew.
  • They are also one of my very favourite vegetables mashed with lots of butter and black pepper however I rely on someone bringing them over for me as they are not grown here(too) warm so a rare treat…

Sambals:

Sambal is a chilli sauce or pastes, typically made from a mixture of a variety of chilli peppers with secondary ingredients such as shrimp paste, garlic, ginger, shallot, scallion, palm sugar, and lime juice.

Sambuca:

Is an anise-flavoured liqueur…it can be served neat as a shot…on the rocks or with water…Like other anise liqueurs, it may be consumed after coffee as an ammazzacaffè or added directly to coffee in place of sugar to produce a caffè corretto.

Sauerbraten:

Known as the German National dish…Sauerbraten is a traditional German roast of heavily marinated meat. It can be prepared from a variety of meats, most often from beef, but also from venison, lamb and mutton, pork and horse.

Sorbets:

Is a frozen dessert made from fruit puree, fruit juice, wine or honey and no dairy…one of my favourites is a raspberry sorbet…

Soybean:

A species of legume native to East Asia…widely grown for its edible bean. Traditional unfermented food uses of soybeans include soy milk, from which tofu and tofu skin are made.

Other uses are cooking oils, meal for animal feeds and fermented uses include soy sauce, fermented bean paste, nattō, and tempeh.

Sweetbreads:

Is the thymus gland and is only available from young animals. As animals mature, the gland degenerates into a mass of connective tissue and fat…It is one part of an animal which I don’t eat…

Yabbies:

Is an Australian freshwater crustacean …a species of crayfish…a name given in Australia to two different kinds of crustacean: Cherax (freshwater yabby), a crayfish. Trypaea (marine yabby),

Usually, yabbies are boiled and eaten plain, or with condiments. … Prior to cooking, it is advisable to ‘purge’ the yabby in clean saltwater, this helps to clear the gut of any muddy flavour, resulting in sweeter tasting meat.

That’s all for today I hope you have enjoyed the letter B…

Thank you so much for your visit today I hope you have enjoyed the read…Please feel free to leave a comment as you know I love to chat…Love Carol xxx

CarolCooks2 weekly roundup…7th March-13th March 2021…#Recipes, Whimsy, Music and Lifestyle Changes

Recipes, Whimsy, Music and Lifestyle Changes…

Welcome to this week’s edition of my weekly roundup of posts…Especially for you just in case you missed a few posts during this last week…we are now in March… the time just flies…I am seeing the first signs of spring in some hemispheres…lambs, snowdrops, daffodils please keep those images coming and the snow I have seen some pictures so those who are experiencing minus temps snuggle up and stay safe and warm…and for those who are experiencing high winds and lashing rain batten down the hatches and stay safe and warm…

Let’s go and see what goodies I had for you last week… snuggle up in your favourite corner with your favourite drink tea/coffee or hot chocolate although depending on where in the world you live it could be a glass of wine…Cheers!

Meatless Monday’s…although it can be any time of the week this week it was Mango Curry..not for everyone certainly not for my testers…lol…also as a dessert with coconut milk and sticky rice…delicious…

But I like it and hope you do it makes a change and I do love mangoes which are very, very plentiful here at the moment…Mango smoothies all round as some are very ripe although I love green mango with a spicy dip…it hits the spot…

https://carolcooks2.com/2021/03/08/meatless-mondays-mango-curry/

My new series of the Culinary Alphabet was launched this week and thank you for your positive comments…

The letter A was quite easy… lots to choose from where the middle letter is A..i.e Brawn, Cabbage, and Yucca …that is the twist the brainchild of Chel Owens who is probably by now wishing she hadn’t…haha…25 weeks to go Chel…just saying…smile…

https://carolcooks2.com/2021/03/10/the-culinary-alphabet-series-3-the-letter-a/

CarolCooks2…Week 4…in my Kitchen…made from scratch…Tahini Paste…

One of the easiest things to make it takes no time at all…and can be used in many ways…A chicken marinade. You know the slightly nutty, yet sweet flavour you love about sesame, a dressing, eggplant dip, add some to your banana bread mix, on toast, use it as a burger topper…

https://carolcooks2.com/2021/03/11/carolcooks2week-4in-my-kitchenmade-from-scratchtahini-paste/

Fruity Friday…

A new addition to my garden to me it looks like a catkin…I can also see the resemblance to the peppercorn…a flowering vine in the family Piperaceae, cultivated for its fruit, which is usually dried and used as a spice and seasoning…but can also be used fresh I have a recipe and can’t wait until I have enough to give it a try…

https://carolcooks2.com/2021/03/12/fruity-friday-thai-long-pepper-dee-bplee-pepper/

Turning Back the Clock…by Sally Cronin.

I am learning so much from this series …small changes I can make which will knock a few years off…Pop over and say hello to Sally and have read it will be worth your time as we can all turn back that clock a little by just making a few easy changes…See you there 🙂

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2021/03/11/smorgasbord-health-column-turning-back-the-clock-2021-part-nine-anti-aging-and-how-we-face-the-world-by-sally-cronin/

Saturday Snippets…

I am so lucky to be living where I come across so many different fruits and vegetables and foods…I don’t think there is a week that goes by where I find something new…last week it was stuffed frogs this week it was the Thai Long Pepper…I wonder what next week will bring lots of pumpkin dishes(which) isn’t new but I have 2 very large pumpkins to use…and lots of pumpkin seeds to roast…another A …Chel x

https://carolcooks2.com/2021/03/13/saturday-snippets-13th-march-2020/

Well, that’s it for today…Thank you so much for dropping by…I hope you have enjoyed the read…if you have please head over and leave a comment it makes my day to hear from you …Love Carol xx