Category Archives: The Culinary Alphabet

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Food Column – Carol Taylor – A – Z of Food ‘R’ for Rice, Ras el Hanout, Rhubarb, Ricotta Cheese and Rice Noodles

The letter R…Rice and noodles(rice) staples here and in many other parts of the world…also lots of other interesting titbits all beginning with R…Thank you, Sally, for running this series…I hope you all enjoy…Please leave your comments we love to hear from you Hugs xx

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

The Culinary Alphabet, The Letter R.

Welcome to this months edition of the Culinary Alphabet, where I am bringing you ingredients and cooking terms beginning with the letter R

Starting with my favorite carb which is?    Rice

There are several grains called rice, which have been cultivated for thousands of years. Asian rice (Oryza sativa) is most widely known and most widely grown, with two major subspecies and over 40,000 varieties. When I first came to Thailand that is when I realized just how many different rices that there were and also colors. The main kinds of rice I cook with are Jasmine Rice, Brown Rice, Black Rice and sticky rice ( glutinous rice)…Thailand is also one of the major exporters of rice and it is the staple food for many here even the dogs eat rice…Mine will not touch dog biscuits or tinned food and many dogs here are…

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CarolCooks2…weekly roundup 6th September -12th September 2020… Recipes, Health, Whimsy, Organic Farming and jamming…

Welcome to this week’s edition of my weekly roundup of posts…Especially for you just in case you missed any posts during the week…So whatever your time zone grab a coffee or a glass of wine…Take a pew, get comfy… have a read… I hope you enjoy it!

 

Relax and Enjoy! (1) Weekly Roundup

Monday always starts with news and my views… always something new to discover…This week was no different…I discussed how Covid-19 has changed our eating habits…

COVID-19 …although devastating to many has meant that many have also discovered the joy of eating food and sharing it with their loved ones…Family time has come to the fore and people are eating together again…

https://carolcooks2.com/2020/09/07/how-covid-19-has-changed-our-eating-and-buying-habits/

Tuesday Topics…Breakfast Oats…

Oats … a popular breakfast dish which is easy to make or can be made and left overnight ready for the morning…When my kiddies were little I used to pop the oats in the slow cooker overnight…hubby was first up and out to work so he had his and as the kids appeared it was nice and hot and ready for them…no burnt saucepans just beautiful porridge oats…

https://carolcooks2.com/2020/09/08/tuesdays-topic-breakfast-oats/

The Culinary Alphabet with a twist…The letter E (agrafE)

The letter E was a doozy…

Did you know?

There are 95069 words that end with E…of course, not all food-related but there are quite a few so I have not gone for the obvious many of your favourites will not be here …Brownie being one but never fear chocolate is still featured…

https://carolcooks2.com/2020/09/09/the-culinary-alphabet-with-a-twist-the-letter-e-agrafe/

National Organic Month…what is organic and what foods are classed as organic and how are they certified?…

Organic farming first began as an alternative method of farming, a healthier way of farming without growing produce using man-made pesticides and fertilisers or contain and use genetically modified organisms (GMO’s)…There are still these small farmers who have no official certification but they follow to the T organic procedures and also take a whole farm approach and practise long term sustainability thus protecting the environment.

That statement made a few of my regular readers smile as like me they had grandparents who practised farming and grew foods without using pesticides …farming then went through changes where like smoking it was seen as a way to get rid of unwanted pests or in the case of smoking it was fashionable…hindsight is wonderful, isn’t it?

Today too many it is a new way of farming…

https://carolcooks2.com/2020/09/10/national-organic-month-what-is-organic-andwhatfoods-are-classed-as-organic-and-how-is-it-certified/

Fruity Friday’s… The chilli and yes it is a fruit!

Chilli plant- hot- spicy- Thai chillies

Chillies are in season all year round here…although a pepper’s hotness is generally determined by genetics, the environment can play a role. Long hot days cause peppers to produce more capsaicin, the specific alkaloid that delivers the spicy kick…The chillies I am picking at the moment have certainly racked the heat up a bit..they are spicy hot babies…

This wonderful versatile fruit which some love to hate… Are the fruits from the flowers of the Nightshade family. Mainly eaten as a vegetable but most definitely it is a fruit.

https://carolcooks2.com/2020/09/11/fruity-fridays-the-chilli-and-yes-it-is-a-fruit-2/

Saturday Snippets…12th September 2020…

Welcome to Saturday Snippets were anything goes…whatever catches my eye or my imagination could be on this post…something for everyone…I hope so…so whatever your timezone grab a coffee or a glass of wine and enjoy!

This week there was music and art, the real million dollar quartet, health from Sally and more…

https://carolcooks2.com/2020/09/12/saturday-snippets-12th-september-2020/

That’s all for this weeks roundup I do hope you have enjoyed it and I look forward to your comments xx

God bless you all in these turbulent times…especially those of my readers who are affected or in the path of these wildfires in California…Please stay safe…x

When this is all over my hope for the future is a cleaner world… I do want to see communities, and caring for your neighbour becoming the new norm…WORKING TOGETHER INSTEAD OF WORKING AGAINST EACH OTHER…Being kind to each other…Loving someone whatever their religion or skin colour…Can we make this happen? We have to but in the right way…Are we willing to make a stand? Personally, I would love to see lessons learnt ..realistically I have my doubts…

Thank you for reading be well and stay safe xxx

About Carol Taylor: Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and well being.

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…Then, I will be happy!

Thank you once again for reading this post I hope you all stay safe and healthy xx

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Food Column – Carol Taylor – A – Z of Food ‘Q’ for Quince, Quail, Quenelles and Quesadillas

This week’s edition of the A-Z of food in the Culinary Alphabet is the letter Q…surprisingly one of the easier letters of the alphabet…Enjoy!

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

The Culinary Alphabet, The letter Q.

I haven’t found the letter Q as difficult as some of the other letters although I am guessing I am heading towards the section of the Alphabet which at some point quite soon will get more difficult. I hope you enjoy this tour around the letter Q.

Quince

The quince looks similar to the pear and is bright golden when it is ripe although that creamy white flesh turns into a deep, dusky red color when it is cooked.

The quince is high in pectin which makes it perfect for preserves and jellies and that is what I remember my mum making with quinces a lovely jam. Raw it has a tart, astringent taste and the smell is likened to that of a tropical fruit it is also packed with Vitamin C.

Quadriller

Is a term used for crosses cut on food for food…

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The Culinary Alphabet with a twist…The letter D (charD)

Welcome and good morning…This week on this topsy turvy blog of mine where nothing stays the same…most of the time the only constant is the fact my posts are food-related of course…I was challenged way back at the beginning of this year by Pete…who suggested that maybe I should use ingredients and cooking methods where the letter used, for example, was the last letter i.e Pizza(A)…

On reflection, I think it was a good idea although how I will fare when I get to some letters I am not sure if it will be doable, but, I will give it a good go… I am not one to back off if challenged…hehe

Today is the letter D ..easy as pie but not so many fruits and veggies it is more processes which I hope doesn’t bore you and at least one is new to you…

 

Arrowhead…

Also known as duck potato…it has round white or bluish tubers that are full of essential nutrients, vitamins and minerals. It has a taste which is similar to potatoes and chestnuts. Roots have long been a significant food source to ethnic peoples of the Americas. Tubers are separated from the ground by several methods: by using the feet, a pitchfork, or even a stick, and generally, come to the surface. quite easily.

How to Eat…

  • Tubers can be dried and ground into a powder, this powder can be used as gruel or combined with cereal flours and used to make bread.
  • American Indians slice the boiled roots into thin sections and then string them on ropes to dry in much the same way as apples.
  • Root raw or cooked, excellent when roasted, the texture is slightly like potatoes with a taste like sweet chestnuts.

Braised…

If something is braised then it is cooked on a low heat and very slowly a good way to cook the tougher cuts of meat and usually results in a glorious tasty gravy. Like this Beef Rendang pictured below a favourite in our house which produces a lovely thick gravy.

Broiled…

If something is broiled it is cooked under an intense heat …As a native English speaker, I would call this method of cooking grilling…Although technically one refers to a top heat and the other to heat which comes from below i.e a BBQ.

Candied…

Preserved by boiling in sugar… this method is applied to fruits which are also known as crystallized fruit or glacé fruit, which has existed since the 14th century. Whole fruit, smaller pieces of fruit, or pieces of peel, are placed in heated sugar syrup, which absorbs the moisture from within the fruit and eventually preserves it.

I love preserved ginger as did my grandmother…

Chard…

Is a green leafy vegetable which often has large stalks which are prepared separately to the leaves…Swiss chard is a favourite of mine quite simply cooked in olive oil with garlic and red pepper…

Chickweed…

As the name suggests is a weed which can grow quite prolifically on a lawn and if your pleasure is a beautifully manicured lawn then I am guessing that you don’t dig it up and eat it…Over the last few years, it has grown very popular with those who forage…

Raw, it tastes exactly like corn silk, if you’ve ever tried that. Cooked it is similar to spinach though the texture is different. It can be added to soups or stews but in the last five minutes to prevent overcooking. Unlike many wild edibles, the chickweed’s stems, leaves, flowers and seeds are all edible. It does hold nitrates and people with allergies to daisies might want to pass it by. Only the Mouse-Ear chickweed should be cooked because of texture issues. The rest of the Chickweeds can be eaten raw but I think they taste better cooked.

Coddled…

In cooking, coddled eggs are eggs that are gently or lightly cooked in water just below the boiling temperature in or out of the shell or other container. They can be partially cooked, mostly cooked, or hardly cooked at all. Poached eggs are a type of coddled egg cooked in water.

Curd…

Is the solid substance which is formed when milk turns sour which is used as a food or made into cheese…It is also the name of the broccoli and cauliflower heads which when cut into small pieces are called florets.

Devilled…

To “devil” food means to season it aggressively, perhaps with a bit of chilli or black pepper heat.

… It can also imply that the food is tinged with red (think paprika sprinkled on top of devilled eggs)

Desiccated…

In cookery is the method used to dry food by removing the moisture i.e desiccated coconut

Fiddlehead…

Are tightly furled tips of ferns again mainly collected in early spring by foraging…Foraging seems to come up a lot on this post but I do believe it is growing in popularity.

Foraged…

To forage is the act of gathering wild food…something which is very popular with the Thais it is done on a daily basis by many…As with all foraging be aware and if in doubt…don’t eat it!

Lily aged 7 yrs out foraging with her mummy…children are taught young here how to forage safely…

Infused…

To infuse is a method of extracting flavours from plant/fruits in water, oil or alcohol, by steeping them for a few minutes or longer i.e. tea or chilli oil…

Fruit waters are another lovely infusion. or beautiful herbs infused in olive oil wonderful over pasta…

Poached…

A method of cooking eggs or fish in water or milk with the addition of aromatics.

Seaweed…

Edible seaweed or sea vegetables are seaweeds which can be eaten or used in the preparation of food…High in fibre, vitamins and minerals, it is becoming increasingly popular around the world. It’s the best dietary source of iodine, which helps support your thyroid gland.

Sauteed…

To fry lightly in fat in a shallow open pan. It is a method of cooking which uses minimal fat over
 
a high heat…The word comes from the French verb sauter, which means “to jump,” and
 
describes not only how food reacts when placed in a hot pan but also the method of tossing the
 
food in the pan.
 

Scad…

The yellowtail scad is an abundant species of small inshore marine fish of the jack family, Carangidae.

Image by takedahrs from Pixabay 

The species is widespread in the Indo-Pacific region from East Africa in the west to Hawaii in the east, extending north to Japan and south to Australia.

 

Shad…

The shad spends most of its life in the Atlantic Ocean but swims up freshwater rivers to spawn.   In the marine environment, shad are schooling fish. Thousands are often seen at the surface in spring, summer, and autumn. They are hard to find in the winter, as they tend to go deeper before spawning season in the range 13–18 °C (55–64 °F) they have been pulled up in nets as deep as 65 fathoms (119 m).

Like other herrings, the American shad is primarily a plankton feeder but eats small shrimp and fish eggs. Occasionally they eat small fish, but these are only a minor item in their general diet.

When the dam’s away, the fish will play: Demolition on Brandywine Creek is restoring shad

That’s all for this week see you in two weeks for the letter E (poutinE)

Please stay safe as it seems in some places lockdowns are being introduced again…not good xx

About Carol Taylor:

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and well being.

The environment is also something I am passionate about and there will be more on this on my blog this year

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…Then, I will be happy!

Please stay safe and well and follow your governments safety guidelines remember we are all in this together xxx

 

 

The Culinary Alphabet with a twist…The letter C(aromatiC)

Welcome to my new series…food-related of course…I was challenged way back at the beginning of this year by Pete…who suggested that maybe I should use ingredients and cooking methods where the letter used, for example, was the last letter i.e Pizza(A)…

On reflection, I think it was a good idea although how I will fare when I get to some letters I am not sure if it will be doable, but, I will give it a good go… I am not one to back off if challenged…hehe

Today it starts with Aromatic(C)

Aromatic:- There is nothing quite like walking into a kitchen and smelling an aromatic smell which gets those taste buds zinging like bacon, coffee or bread baking or walking along the street and passing a house or a cafe and those delicious smells come wafting past your nose…it can be combinations of vegetables and herbs (and sometimes even meats) that are heated in some fat – like butter, oil, or coconut milk – at the beginning of a dish. The heated fat helps these ingredients release addictive aromas and impart deep flavours into the dish that’s being cooked.

spices-5250563_640

I think apart from bread and bacon my favourite smells are spices…cinnamon,  cloves, nutmeg, star anise so many beautiful aromatic spices…

Armagnac or Cognac: What is your preference? Do you know the difference between these two brandies? I should have as my father loved a glass of brandy his favourite being Cognac…

The major difference between Cognac and Armagnac is the distillation. While Cognac is twice distilled using a pot still, Armagnac undergoes column distillation… column stills are 15 plates or less,” says Leonardo Comercio, sales manager for PM Spirits, an importer that specializes in brandy. “They are not there to strip and transfer raw material into a neutral distillate. They cleanse it and give it a high aromatic tone that would still be a flavourful distillate before it even goes into the barrel.”

cognac-3404_640

Cognac is a brandy specifically made from wine in the Cognac region of France. The primary grape used to make Cognac is Ugni Blanc, though smaller amounts of Folle Blanche (also called Picpoul) and Colombard are allowed.

Armagnac is more rustic in production, which results in a full-flavoured brandy that importer Charles Neal, of Charles Neal Selections, calls “a bit more…forward and punchy.” The brandy used to produce Armagnac was made historically by roving distillers. Stills in tow, they would travel to farms in the hinterlands, allowing the farmers to make brandy from their wine without having to buy equipment of their own…How cool is that?

Ascorbic(acid):- or as it is better known Vitamin C…the sunshine vitamin found in all the colourful fruits and vegetables and generally in quite high amounts ..Bell Peppers, Oranges, Pineapples, Limes, Lemons, Tomatoes, Broccoli…so many lovely coloured fruits and veggies to choose from so you get your quota of Vitamin C…

Aspic- A savoury jelly usually made from meat stock and sometimes meat, fish or eggs are added…it is then set into a mould to set and once set sliced…Aspic is a type of stock which is high in gelatin, and which sets into jelly when cooled. Unflavored gelatin will have basically the same mechanical properties as aspic, as long as the gelatin concentration is roughly the same (1/2 tbsp of dry gelatin will set about a cup of liquid.

I remember my mum and my nan making this years ago for high days and holidays…my dad and nan loved it us kids not so much..I am guessing now that gelatin may be used more often than not…My mum used to make something called brawn which was set in aspic jelly.

Balsamic:- or Balsamic vinegar which some say goes right back to Roman times…I love a good balsamic with oil and some beautiful bread and olives…That’s me sorted…

That beautiful thick vinegar takes any dish up a notch…Balsamic is not made from a wine like most kinds of vinegar but from grapes which are boiled down to concentrate the sugars this is called a grape must…this grape must is then divided into different tubs and a heated tile is put into each one…after one year this becomes vinegar and then goes through a process of being transferred through casks made of different woods while it is maturing..which can take several years…primarily from the Modena and Reggio Emilia regions in Italy…It wasn’t until the late 70’s when it became a global phenomenon and used by chefs and home cooks around the world…I am sure the production of it now has changed vastly but if you are able to get a properly matured balsamic… treat it with reverence…it is a wonderful thing…

Celeriac:- Not the prettiest vegetable in the rack is it? But what a wonderful vegetable it is …one of my favourites which unfortunately I can’t buy here but my visitors always sneak one or two in their cases we love it!

celeriac-2653117_640

Belonging to the celery family it was cultivated for its edible stem or hypocotyl, and shoots. Celeriac can be peeled, cut and boiled then mashed like potatoes or baked whole…It makes a lovely soup or married with parsnips and baked au gratin it is a beautiful side dish. Raw it is a delicious slaw ingredient such a versatile vegetable it goes well with meat or fish.

Citric(acid):- Citric acid is a widely used preservative in the food and beverage industry. Citric acid was discovered by Karls Scheels in England in 1874 in lemon juice. Citric acid is found in almost all plants and in many microorganisms and animal tissues and fluids. Citric acid is a sour principle of citrus fruits such as orange and lemon and exhibits a mild and refreshing sour taste. It is widely used to add an acidic (sour) taste to soft drinks, jams, candies, and so on. It is also used as a natural preservative.

Garlic:- Garlic is also a lovely thing infused in Olive oil and is a base for many dishes, lovely garlic aioli or roasted garlic puree alleviates a dish to new heights. It is such a versatile little bulb as well as being packed with health benefits.

Baked garlic and shallots with sherry.

This to me is perfection…. Lovely young garlic cloves and beautiful banana shallots… Serve on grilled bread, with a spoonful or two of goat’s curd, or as an accompaniment to a simple roast chicken. Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 4 garlic bulbs
  • 8 banana shallots
  • 5 lemon thyme sprigs (or ordinary thyme)
  • 4 bay leaves
  • 600 ml fresh chicken stock
  • 180 ml sherry
  • 50g unsalted butter, in pieces
  • 50g parmesan, freshly grated
  • Salt and black pepper

Let’s Cook

Preheat the oven to 180C/350F/gas mark 4.

Slice the garlic bulbs in half horizontally and place in a roasting tray. Halve the shallots, slip off their outer skins and add to the garlic. Season, with salt and pepper, and then scatter the lemon thyme and bay leaves over the garlic and shallots…

Bring the chicken stock to the boil in a small pan; pour over the garlic and shallots. Drizzle over the sherry.

Cover the tray tightly with foil and roast in the oven for 40 minutes. Remove the foil and return to the oven for a further 15 minutes, until the shallots and garlic are golden brown and the stock has reduced down and thickened. Add the butter and parmesan and stir to combine. Taste, adjust the seasoning and then serve.

Gac (fruit):- Gac fruit is not a common fruit and quite a treat when it is found on the local markets in Southern Thailand or grown on land and in gardens as are many of the less commercial fruits.

Gac fruit

With its prickly outer shell which is NOT edible this fruit grows on climbing vines. Going from green to a dark orange when it is ripe this fruit has a short season of only 2 months from December to January. It is quite a rare fruit but it can be found on local markets in Southern Thailand. It is the soft pulp surrounding the edible seeds which you eat. The seeds are not only edible but used in traditional Chinese medicines.

It is used to treat eye conditions, burns, skin problems and wounds.

The juice makes a healthy drink which is said to be good for the eyes, immunity, skin and heart health. The taste is a cross between a tomato and ripe papaya it is also commonly called the Gac fruit. Its other names are  Chanbada Fruit or spiny bitter gourd.

Today the Gac fruit extracts are used in very popular skincare supplements around the world. Rich in antioxidants and beta-carotene it is said to contain 70 times more than in tomatoes or zeaxanthin.

It has the highest concentration of beta-carotene than any other known fruit or vegetable as much as 10 times more than the carrot.

Once in the body, it converts to Vitamin A and is said to have a variety of protective properties.

Due to the fruits magnificent orange hue, it is often grown as an ornamental plant.

It is also used to make a delicious deep-fried sweet cooked in coconut batter. You will only find this sweet in the south of Thailand as the fruit is quite rare which also makes it expensive. It also tends to be found in local gardens and not really grown commercially.

Its brilliant orange colour is very attractive and it is also cooked in  Khao Soi( Sticky Rice) flavoured with cinnamon and served at New Year Celebrations and weddings.

Mollusc:- have soft bodies and don’t have legs, though some have flexible tentacles for sensing their environment or grabbing things. Mainly marine they include clams, scallops, oysters, and mussels. 

Sumac:- I hadn’t heard of sumac until a few years ago and it seems to have become increasingly more popular lately and is appearing in more recipes.

A wine-coloured ground spice is one of the most useful but still least known and most underappreciated. Made from dried berries, it has an appealing lemon-lime tartness that can be widely used. In Iran, they use it as a condiment, putting it onto the table with salt and pepper.

Using sumac instead of lemon juice or zest immediately enhances dishes, giving a fascinating and exotic twist. Fish, poultry and vegetable dishes all spring to life in a new way. Simply sprinkle over yoghurt as a dip, too. Try some you will be glad you have 🙂

Turmeric:- commonly used in Asian food. You probably know turmeric as the main spice in curry. It has a warm, bitter taste and is frequently used to flavour or colour curry powders, mustards, butter, and cheeses.

It grows freely here and is part of the ginger family the leaves are very, very similar it is only when you pull some up that the difference in the tubers is obvious. I grow both in my garden and keep them separate to avoid hubby getting confused when I ask him to get me some…

That’s all for this week see you in two weeks for the letter D (squiD)

Please stay safe as it seems in some places lockdowns are being introduced again…not good xx

About Carol Taylor:

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and well being.

The environment is also something I am passionate about and there will be more on this on my blog this year

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…Then, I will be happy!

Please stay safe and well and follow your governments safety guidelines remember we are all in this together xxx

 

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Food Column – Carol Taylor – A – Z of Food – ‘O’ for Oats, Offal, Octopus, Oranges and Oysters.

Over half way through time just seems to fly…The letter O…Thank you Sally for promoting this series you are a star…Hugs xxx

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

Welcome to this month’s The Culinary Alphabet beginning with the letter O bought to you by moi @CarolCooks2. It seems to me that the time is just flying by… Such a funny year so far unprecedented in so many ways…

The letter O…Not as many culinary terms or fruits or vegetables beginning with O but I have a few for you, I hope you enjoy!

Oats

As children, in the winter months, my mum always started our day with a bowl of oats and when it is cold there is no better start to the day…Oats are whole grain, meaning the grain is intact and the kernel is composed of three distinct parts: the bran, endosperm, and germ. Because they are whole grain, they have more nutrients, including vitamins, minerals, and fibre, than other processed grains. Oats also have more soluble fibre than most grains, much of which is beta-glucan…

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