Category Archives: The reverse culinary alphabet

The Culinary Alphabet with a little twist…The last in this series…Y and Z…

The end of the line, finished, all done…I bet Pete is heaving a sigh of relief…it’s been fun though, Pete…I am now penning my last post in this series…

Y & Z…a few food terms ending in Y not so many for Z…But I am looking forward to my next challenge it should be interesting and as I said in my weekly round up I will changing it about with some environmental terms…never boring here…it also keeps the old grey matter on its toes…

Anchovy:

Is a small common forage fish…very fishy and salty in taste and they have to be balanced as they could overwhelm all the other flavours in a dish…like Marmite you either love them or have an extreme dislike for them…Filleted, salt-cured and canned in oil to me they are the difference between a good dish and a great dish…

Bignay:

Native to Southeast Asia and northern Australia…its leaves are used to treat snakebites…some other names are bugnay or bignai, Chinese-laurel, Queensland-cherry, salamander-tree, wild cherry, and currant tree …for a tree which can grow as tall as 50 to 100ft it has tiny fruits which are edible, usually eaten raw, cooked and used in jam, jellies and preserves.

The Cherry:

There are around 1,200 varieties of cherries in the world, each with its own unique taste and appearance…with colours ranging from deep purple, bright red and a beautiful peachy hue the cherry is a popular fruit. From North America’s leading commercial sweet cherry and a favourite of many a cherry connoisseur. The Bing cherry is large with an intensely sweet, vibrant flavour. The fruit, when ripe, is firm, juicy and a deep mahogany red.

Of course as with many things we have the worlds most expensive cherry…from Japan

Bok Choy:

Bok choy or Chinese white cabbage is a staple ingredient in Asian dishes. The tender dark green leaves and crisp off-white-coloured stalks provide a nice fresh crunch. The greens have a spinach-like taste with a very mild bitterness…Great for stirfries, steamed as a side dish or pickled.

Borodinsky bread:

Is a Russian dark Rye Bread…rich in flavour as with many traditional breads there are varieties of ingredients depending on regions where recipes are handed down through generations sometimes wholewheat flour is used… there are many tales as to the origins of this bread but not being Russian I would not profess to know the truth from a fairy tale…I just know it is a delicious bread…

The Berry:

Where to start there are so many… Strawberry, raspberry, gooseberry, blackberry, loganberry, blueberry, lingonberry sloe berry’s …my dad used to make gin with them…There are the botanical berry’s which include banana, grapes, tomatoes, eggplants and more…

Carraway:

My nana used love carraway seeds she added them to cakes and bread and buttered cabbage… often as they look so like the cumin seeds it is asked are they the same…No!…Carraway has quite a distinctly earthy, liquorice taste whereas cumin is milder…Carraway is delicious added to buttered cabbage.

Celery:

A marshland plant with a long fibrous stalk tapering into leaves…both the stalks and leaves are eaten raw or cooked…I find green celery quite bitter and much prefer the taste of white stemmed celery…Celery stalks provide a crunchy low-calorie snack and eaten with some hummus or peanut butter is delicious.

Celery and peanut butter, or any other type of nut butter, is a simple snack that will provide you with plenty of fats and protein to keep you satiated. Nut butter is also a great source of fibre, vitamins B, A, and E, iron, zinc, magnesium, and potassium.

Chicory:

Many varieties are cultivated for salad leaves, chicons, or roots, which are baked, ground, and used as a coffee substitute and food additive.

Chicons au gratin is a Belgian national dish consisting of braised Belgian endives (aka chicons) wrapped in slices of baked ham and covered with a Mornay sauce and some grated cheese. Steaming hot with a creamy cheesy sauce…Delicious…

It is often used as a caffeine-free coffee substitute due to its resemblance IN colour and aroma to the coffee. The perfect blend of chicory to coffee enhances coffee taste and aroma by imparting a slightly woody and nutty taste to the coffee. Chicory blend coffee is also economical when compared to 100 per cent coffee.

I remember my mother buying Camp Coffee which was a liquid coffee and chicory(chicons) mix…Does anyone else remember that? I also remember her coffee and walnut sponge cake…This recipe for coffee and walnut sponge is from the Camp Coffee Club...

Chutney:

Chutney there is nothing like it with a ploughman’s lunch…which for those who are not familiar with the term it is crusty bread, butter, cheeses and or meat and chutney..it got its name as it was what was lovingly wrapped in cloth and given to the farmworkers for their lunch while working in the fields…Chutney is basically a strong-tasting mixture of fruit, vinegar, sugar, and spices.

Mango Chutney...no curry should be eaten without it…My mother used to make chutneys in the autumn with the last of the tomatoes, apples, onion chutney, garlic chutney, apple chutney, pear chutney is my latest addition to my chutney collection…

Ingredients for Pear Chutney…

  • 200 gm demerara sugar
  • 200 ml Apple cider vinegar
  • 100 ml pear cider
  • 1-star anise
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp grated ginger
  • 2 red onions chopped
  • 10 firm pears peeled and chopped
  • 2 red chillies halved and deseeded
  • 50 gm sultanas

Let’s Pickle!

In a large pan bring the sugar, APV, pear cider, star anise, ground cumin, ginger and red onions to a rolling boil.

Add the chopped pears and bring down to a rolling simmer for about 40 mins or until the pears are just cooked.

Stir in the sultanas and the chillies. Remove from the heat and leave to cool before spooning into sterilised jars.

Pear ChutneyThis is a lovely chutney that goes well with cheese and homemade focaccia…

Clarify:

Clarify is to make something clear or pure…Clarified butter (Ghee) for example or a clarified soup or stock..consomme for example…where the soup is clarified using a raft and then passed through cheesecloth.

Cray:

Cray Fish are aquatic arthropods and very tasty cooked on the BBQ with some garlic butter…

Day Lily:

Daylilies are a popular staple in Asian cuisine and they are used both fresh and dried. Every part of the daylily plant is edible: you can pluck the young shoots, boil the tubers like potatoes, or spruce up your salads with its bright orange petals. But my very favourite part is the flower bud which we steam and eat with a spicy chilli dip…where we lived before in Phuket the security guard used to pick the flowers at dawn and bring them to me they were a favourite of Aston’s grandad who loved to eat them…

Good King Henry:

Also known as poor man’s asparagus…native to much of central and southern Europe many liken the taste to spinach but it needs to be picked young as it becomes bitter as it matures. The leaves, stalks and flower buds are edible. The leaves can be boiled, steamed or eaten raw in salads. The young shoots and stalks can be picked before they go hollow and steamed or boiled, eaten like asparagus, while the flower buds are delicious just sautéed in butter.

Hominy:

Hominy is a food made from kernels of corn that have undergone a special chemical process to make the grain easier for use in cooking and eating. The kernels are soaked in an alkali solution that removes the hull and germ of the corn, causing the grain to puff up to about twice its normal size, giving it the appearance of giant corn. Hominy has become a staple of Mexican cooking, traditionally used in soups, stews, and casseroles.

Pandowdy:

What a lovely name for a rustic fruit pie…Apples, peaches or plums…delicious

Salsify:

Salsify is a root vegetable that has an oyster-like flavour when cooked…a root vegetable that belongs to the dandelion family. The root is similar in appearance to a long, thin parsnip, with creamy white flesh and thick skin. In the same way, like many root vegetables, salsify can be boiled, mashed or used in soups and stews.

Soy:

A species of legume native to East Asia, widely grown for its edible bean, which has numerous uses. Traditional unfermented food uses of soybeans include soy milk, from which tofu and tofu skin are made. Fermented soy foods include soy sauce, fermented bean paste, nattō, and tempeh.

The letter Zzzzzzzz…

Blintz:

A popular cigar-shaped pancake filled with cheese or fruit…

Blitz:

To purée or chop (food products) using a food processor or blender. To make a nut roast, you have to blitz the nuts in the food processor before adding the parsley and breadcrumbs.

Chametz:

Chametz includes grains like wheat, oats, rye, barley and spelt, which are prohibited if they’ve had contact with water/moisture for longer than 18 minutes, leading to rising or “leavening.” Leavening agents, like yeast and sourdough, are also considered chametz.

N.B…A little add on from Dolly @ KoolKosherKitchen…Chametz is only prohibited during the eight days of Passover, lest your readers think that we don’t eat baked goods during the year….and a note from me I never ever thought Dear Dolly didn’t eat cake…haha…Thank you for the info xx

Fizz:

A “fizz” is a mixed drink variation on the older sours family of the cocktail. Its defining features are acidic juice (such as lemon or lime) and carbonated water.

Ritz:

I’m digging deep here as Ritz is a brand name of crackers lovely with cheese…

Schmalz:

Is rendered (clarified) chicken or goose fat. It is an integral part of traditional Ashkenazi Jewish cuisine, where it has been used for centuries in a wide array of dishes, such as chicken soup, latkes, chopped liver, matzah balls, fried chicken or schmaltz herring used either as a  cooking fat, spread, or flavour enhancer.

Varenez:

Made from melted milk by adding cream. Melted milk is baked milk for many hours in the oven. Verenez is nice to add to coffee or tea.

That’s it…THE END…I do hope you have enjoyed this series and I hope you will enjoy what follows next week…Thank you, Pete, for the idea and thank you to everyone else who has stayed with me through this series and left comments and ideas you are all stars…xxx

Thank you so much for your visit today I hope you have enjoyed the read…Please feel free to leave a comment as you know I love to chat…Love Carol xxx

CarolCooks2 weekly roundup…14th February-20th February 2021…#Recipes, Whimsy, Music and Lifestyle Changes

Recipes, Whimsy, Music and Lifestyle Changes…

Welcome to this week’s edition of my weekly roundup of posts…Especially for you just in case you missed a few posts during this last week… For those of you who celebrate Valentines Day…I hope you had a Happy Valentines Day xx

Enjoyed the chocolate I hope so as it is National Chocolate month… so fill your boots and enjoy! My thoughts turn to Easter with crossed fingers that my moulds arrive in time for me to make a lovely egg for Lily her first…

Let’s go and see what goodies I had for you last week…so snuggle up in your favourite corner with your favourite drink tea/coffee or hot chocolate although depending on where in the world you live it could be a glass of wine…Cheers!

Meatless Monday’s: Week 6…#Frittata.

Such a versatile dish and it uses up lots of bits and pieces of veggies that are sitting in your fridge an ideal once a week meal which means less waste as well…

https://carolcooks2.com/2021/02/15/meatless-mondays-week-6-frittata/

#Protein Shakes…Should you be drinking them?…

I think you should check out the ingredients before you do and also make sure that you are getting as much protein as you should from your normal DIET and if not because you are following a rigorous exercise regime or a vegan diet AND may need to have protein drinks sometimes…

https://carolcooks2.com/2021/02/16/protein-shakes-should-you-be-drinking-them/

It was Pancake Day last Tuesday…I hope you enjoyed yours as much as I enjoyed mine…

https://carolcooks2.com/2021/02/16/pancake-day-16th-february-aka-shrove-tuesday-mardi-gras-or-fat-tuesday/

Wednesday I was also over at Sally’s for my monthly POST…  Carol Taylor’s Green Kitchen – Bread, Homemade Peanut Butter and Home Grown Vegetables and Herbs.

I don’t think I realised just how popular Peanut Butter is…

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2021/02/17/smorgasbord-food-column-carol-taylors-green-kitchen-bread-homemade-peanut-butter-and-home-grown-vegetables-and-herbs/

Time for one of the last posts in this current series of  The Culinary Alphabet with a little twist…Food terms ending in the letter X (loX)

Next week is the last one…The good news is that it will be followed by a new twist of the Alphabet…my fellow bloggers are so kind to me with suggestions and good ones at that…this time it was from Chel Owens…or Chelsea who writes poems at… A Wife, My Verse, and Every Little Thing...Lots of great poetry which I love to read and now and again Chel drops little hints but I truly am not a poet even a bad one…Her suggestion was that I find food terms and food where the middle letter is A for example…Thanx Chel…Like Pete, I will expect at least one word from you every fortnight…xx

I have decided as I am also passionate about the environment to run 2  different subjects consecutively and do a week about so every second week it will be environmental terms, for example, beginning with A etc…although with that I will generally only opt for 3 terms if there are three and explain them in a bit more detail as some environmental terms I know the word but not really what it means…so maybe we can all learn a little more…That’s the plan xxx

https://carolcooks2.com/2021/02/17/the-culinary-alphabet-with-a-little-twistfood-terms-ending-in-the-letter-x-lox/

It was then over to Sally’s for her wonderfully information series on how we can turn back the clock a little…

Please pop over ..say hello and find out how you can stop the clock…see you there #recommenedread

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2021/02/18/smorgasbord-health-column-turning-back-the-clock-2021-part-six-anti-aging-and-oxygen-by-sally-cronin/

Fruity Friday...and a weirdly beautiful fruit it is this week…

One which I can’t wait until my bush arrives and I can watch it grow…The Buddha Hand Fruit.

https://carolcooks2.com/2021/02/19/fruity-friday-buddha-hand-fruit/

Saturday Snippets…

Recipes, PJ.Proby and The Beatles…some environmental news, apricots and Easter Eggs…

https://carolcooks2.com/2021/02/20/saturday-snippets-20th-february-2020/

Well, that’s it for today…Thank you so much for dropping by…I hope you have enjoyed the read…if you have please head over and leave a comment it makes my day to hear from you …Love Carol xx

The Culinary Alphabet with a twist…The letter H (noocH)

Good morning everyone and Pete… time for another post which is this crazy idea from one of my fellow scribes …but food fun…I have left out squash as It has mentioned in a few previous posts…

Blanch:

A cooking process whereby food, usually a vegetable or fruit, is scalded in boiling water, removed after a brief, timed interval, and finally plunged into iced water or placed under cold running water to halt the cooking process.

Blowtorch: ( Culinary)

Think Creme Brulee with that lovely crackle on top…think meringues with just a touch of brown, think a lovely sear on your meat or fish without drying up the flesh, think skinning your peppers and tomatoes if you are running out of time…you can even heat up your knife to cut frozen meat…

Bortsch:

Hot or cold Borsch is a lovely thing I was taught how to make it by my Russian neighbour when I lived in Phuket they also taught me the correct way to make and drink a Bloody Mary the Russian way….hmmmm…that certainly involved less tomato juice and more Vodka…

Butterscotch:

Butterscotch is a type of soft-crack sweet created by slowly heating butter and brown sugar together. Just like caramel, the brown sugar molecules break down and, thanks to the addition of molasses in the sugar, caramelize into a richer, deeper flavour than classic caramel.

Butterscotch is cooked at a lower temperature which means as sweets/candy is is not quite as brittle as toffee if making a butterscotch pudding which used be one of my favourites as a child and writing this I am thinking that maybe I should recreate my mother’s pudding it also can make a lovely drizzle over ice cream or cheesecakes or it is lovely stirred into a biscuit/cookie mix…

To create a sauce, topping, or candy, additional ingredients like vanilla, salt, and cream can be added once caramelization has occurred.

Cheesecloth:

Cheesecloth is gauze-like, woven cotton cloth. Its original purpose was for making and wrapping homemade cheese, but it has become a useful tool in other recipes as well. It is used as a strainer when a fine sieve is needed, as a cover for roast turkey or chicken to keep the bird moist, and is made into little pouches for herbs for seasoning meats, broth, soups, and other dishes. Cheesecloth is something we may not often have in our kitchen. If you don’t have any on hand, luckily there are plenty of alternatives. Just make sure the item is clean before cooking.

If you don’t have cheesecloth you can use a coffee filter, a mesh bag, a fine wire sieve I have even heard of chefs using pantyhose…as long as it is fine almost any cotton fabric will do…luckily it is one item I can easily obtain here.

Cornstarch:

Is a popular thickener although I prefer to use Arrowroot, rice flour or tapioca flour…potato water can also be used as a thickener. Cornstarch is mostly flavorless, and thus adds texture rather than taste. It’s a bland powder that’s usually used to thicken dishes. However, Cornstarch is considered a refined carb, meaning that it has undergone extensive processing and been stripped of its nutrients.

Eggwash:

Is a mixture of beaten egg and liquid (usually water or milk) that is brushed onto baked goods like pastries before baking. It adds shine and color and helps to seal up edges.

It is also one of the simplest jobs which children love to do in the kitchen…

Ghivech:

A Romanian vegetable stew …A mixed vegetable stew with lots of herbs.

Goulash:

A Hungarian stew or soup of meat and vegetables flavoured with paprika thick and hearty it dates back to medieval times. One of Hungary’s National Dishes. Sometimes served with sour cream and always with crusty bread, it was originally a dush eaten by shepherds.

 

Horseradish:

Spicy and an excellent accompaniment to beef…Love it or hate it Horseradish is a wonderful accompaniment to beef and beets. For some lovely recipes see my cookery column on Smorgasbord.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2018/04/25/smorgasbord-blog-magazine-the-food-and-cookery-column-with-carol-taylor-horseradish/

Hooch:

Hooch, a colloquial term for an alcoholic distilled beverage. Moonshine, illicitly distilled spirits.

Murgh:

Is the name for chicken…who hasn’t loved the chicken Murgh on an Indian restaurant menu…

Nooch:

This was a new one for me I have heard not tried Nutritional Yeast and Nooch is short for nutritional yeast. Nutritional yeast is deactivated yeast and can be bought in the form of powder or flakes. It is often used for vegan sauces because of its super cheesy taste. Nutritional yeast is something that should not be missed in a vegan household.

Peach:

Who doesn’t love a nice juicy peach they can be eaten raw, made into a beautiful dessert, or grilled with olive oil, fresh thyme, black pepper, and basil they are a wonderful thing…

Radish:

The root of a member of the mustard family, radishes have a peppery flavour and a crisp, crunchy texture. Among the most popular varieties is the small, cherry-sized common variety which has red skin and white flesh (the French Breakfast radish is a variation on this type, and has an elongated shape with a deep pink skin that fades to white at the roots).

You can also find black radishes, popular in eastern Europe, which are more strongly flavoured, as well as large white mooli or daikon radishes, which are shaped like carrots. They are popular in Asian cookery and have a very mild flavour.

Radishes are rich in folic acid and potassium and are a good source of vitamin B6, magnesium, riboflavin, and calcium.

Redbush:

Is one of my favourite teas…also commonly known as Rooibos it is low in tannin and is caffeine-free.

Saltbush:

From red bush to Saltbush which is a lovely native vegetable salty and herby they can be blanched, sautéed, wrapped around meat or fish, used in salads, or for stuffing poultry. Alternatively, they may be dried and used as a herb or sprinkle.

Sourdough:

Sourdough bread is a lovely thing and it said that many people are cultivating their sourdough culture due to their quarantine which is good as it makes lovely bread and even the discard can be used in many ways like pancakes for example…It took me a few goes before I got mine properly started but I learnt a lot about flour and its differences which has improved my baking.

Spinach:

Loaded with nutrients and antioxidants Spinach is classed as a very healthy vegetable…and we all remember Popeye and the now-iconic ads. It can be eaten raw in salads, lightly sauteed in butter or olive oil…Serve it wilted in pasta or in an omelette or quiche…a very versatile dark green leafy vegetable…Our families favourite recipe using spinach is this spicy green chicken recipe…

Succotash:

Succotash is a culinary dish consisting primarily of sweet corn with lima beans or other shell beans. Other ingredients may be added including corned beef, potatoes, turnips, salt pork, tomatoes, multi-coloured sweet peppers, and okra.

Tabbouleh:

Tabouli salad or Tabbouleh is a simple Mediterranean salad of very finely chopped vegetables, lots of fresh parsley and bulgur wheat, …

Tempeh:

Made from fermented soya beans it is a traditional Indonesian product ..a plant-based protein source..not something I have used or tried have you?

Waterbath:

What is it..put simply it is a pan of water put in your oven and used to cook cheesecakes(it stops) then cracking…creme caramel, baked custard anything which requires a slow even cooking …

Just a tip: If you use a springform pan for a recipe that calls for a water bath, wrap the pan first with aluminum foil to prevent water from leaking through the bottom. Use two or three sheets in a crisscross pattern for best results.

That’s all for this week see you in two weeks for the letter I (enokI)…

Please stay safe as it seems in some places lockdowns are being introduced again…not good xx

About Carol Taylor:

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and well being.

The environment is also something I am passionate about and there will be more on this on my blog this year

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…Then, I will be happy!

Please stay safe and well and follow your governments safety guidelines remember we are all in this together xxx

 

The Culinary Alphabet with a twist…The letter B(herB)

Welcome to my new series…food-related of course…I was challenged way back at the beginning of this year by Pete…who suggested that maybe I should use ingredients and cooking methods where the letter used, for example, was the last letter i.e Pizza(A)…

On reflection, I think it was a good idea although how I will fare when I get to some letters I am not sure if it will be doable but I will give it a good go… I am not one to back of if challenged…hehe

Today it starts with Bicarb(B)

Bicarb – Also known as Sodium bicarbonate, aka baking soda…Baking soda tends to be the American name, while in the UK and in Australia we tend to call it bicarbonate of soda (Bicarb).

Bicarb, or baking soda, is an alkali that is used to raise soda bread and full-flavoured cakes such as gingerbread, fruit cake, chocolate cake, and carrot cake. It needs an acid (as well as moisture) to activate it so is often combined with cream of tartar, yogurt, buttermilk, or milk.

Sally Yeast Free Soda Bread

Bicarbonate of soda gives off carbon dioxide, which expands in a mixture. Once the mixture is cooked, the carbon dioxide is replaced by air, leaving a light cake or bread.

As with all raising agents, use the amount specified in the recipe. Adding extra bicarbonate of soda can result in a peaked or collapsed cake, a strong unpleasant flavour, and a greenish tinge.

Carob –  I have just learned something I thought carob was another name for cocoa well it isn’t…Carob powder and carob chips are similar to cocoa powder and choc chips in colour, however, carob is less bitter and has a naturally sweet flavour.

It is also caffeine-free and higher in fibre…It can also be used as an alternative to cocoa powder and by adding coffee it will also taste like chocolate.

Carob bean juice can also be used as a safe and effective way to treat diarrhea in children.

Crab – Who doesn’t love a crab sandwich or a crab curry? I know I do … There are thousands of different types of crabs that are divided into over 850 species. Most varieties of crab have a hard outer shell (called an exoskeleton), 3 walking legs on either side of their body, and 2 pinching claws.

crab-1934857_1280

Of course, like other foods, there are always the more popular of the species which we love to eat…King crabs are one of the most common and best types of edible crabs due to their large size and delicate taste.

Of the smaller crabs, the one which is very popular here are Blue crabs which are a type of swimming crab that have 2 paddle-like feet to help it swim. In fact, its scientific name literally means ‘beautiful savory swimmer.’

Crumb – a very small piece of bread, cake, or biscuit…which has many uses it can be used to coat meat or fish or as a sprinkling with some cheese on top of an au gratin…

bread crumb-2542308_640

Biscuit or cake crumbs can be used as a fruit topping or toasted and used to top ice cream or as a decoration for a dessert…So whatever you do don’t waste anything like this as it can be made into crumbs…

Corncob – the part of the maize plant on which the grain grows…

corncob-1031202_640

A popular and tasty vegetable which can be boiled, baked, BBQ’d…Cut from the cob and made into creamed corn, or eaten as a side or a topping for a jacket potato it is very versatile, plentiful, and tasty…

Curbdelivery (food industry term):      The practice of delivering an order in bulk to the pavement in front of a retail store; or from the tailgate of a truck to an adjacent platform

Herb – A Culinary herb, which is available fresh or dried, include basil, bay leaf, chervil, marjoram, mint, oregano, parsley, rosemary, sage, savory, tarragon and thyme. Used for their aromatic properties, flavour, and texture.

Hobnob- A New World style of wine that is evenly balanced, fruit-forward, with a rich mouthfeel and hints of oak. 5 popular varieties – Pinot Noir, California Chardonnay, Merlot, Red Blend, and Cabernet Sauvignon. …

Hobnob is also a biscuit/cookie …It is the brand name of a commercial biscuit. They are made from rolled oats and jumbo oats, similar to a flapjack-digestive biscuit hybrid, and are among the most popular British biscuits. McVitie’s launched Hobnobs in 1985 and a milk chocolate variant in 1987. Wikipedia

Honeycomb- A honeycomb is a mass of hexagonal prismatic wax cells built by honey bees in their nests to contain their larvae and stores of honey and pollen.

fresh wild honey comb

 

This is my lovely fresh honeycomb…

Honeycomb is also a lovely sweet which can be covered in chocolate crunchie or used in desserts…

crunchie bar-2201990_640

 

Made with golden syrup, sugar, and bicarb it is fun to make and although very sweet good to eat as a treat or stir some through your ice cream.

Ingredients:

  • butter, for greasing
  • 200g caster sugar
  • 5 tbsp golden syrup
  • 2 tsp bicarbonate of soda

Let’s Cook!

Butter a 20cm square tin.

Mix 200g caster sugar and 5 tbsp golden syrup in a deep saucepan and stir over a gentle heat until the sugar has melted. Try not to let the mixture bubble until the sugar grains have disappeared.

Once completely melted, turn up the heat a little and simmer until you have an amber-coloured caramel (this won’t take long), then as quickly as you can turn off the heat, tip in 2 tsp bicarbonate of soda and beat in with a wooden spoon until it has all disappeared and the mixture is foaming. Scrape into the tin immediately but be careful as the mixture will be very hot indeed..be careful…

The mixture will continue bubbling in the tin, simply leave it, and in about 1 hr – 1 hr 30 mins the honeycomb will be hard and ready to crumble or snap into chunks.

Enjoy!

Kebab- I love a good homemade kebab either formed around a skewer and then cooked on the BBQ or if I am making chicken kebabs then I use lemongrass as my skewers and then they impart a lovely lemon flavour. or marinate your meat and skewer it with onions and peppers and pop on the barbie…

chicken-kebabs-salad-rice

or make your own kebab meat like I did the other week and make your own pitta with love green chilli peppers.

Lamb- A meat I cannot always get here and to my way of thinking lamb, if it is lovely spring lamb, is best eaten with jersey royal potatoes and fresh peas and beans…

Rhubarb –A perennial plant with thick red stalks and large green leaves that are poisonous. The stalks have a tart flavor and are often used in pies and tarts. My favourite rhubarb pie and custard.

rhubarb-1350969_640

They do have absolutely glorious looking leaves but never ever be tempted as they are poisonous to eat…

Scab – Causes rough scabby patches on the potato skin and the flesh underneath. It is unsightly and can affect storage potential. Any potatoes with scab should be used quickly.

Shrub – An old-fashioned sweetened fruit drink, sometimes spiked with liquor which seems to be having a revival over recent years. All you have to do is make a flavoured vinegar for wonderful drinks with soda and ice or with cocktails…

Sparerib – The long cut of meat from the lower breast bone of the hog. Spareribs are best cooked slowly so that their fat can be rendered and they can become tender.

Pork-ribs-asian-flavours

These were absolutely delicious…finger bowls required and a bib…

Squab –  is a young domestic pigeon, typically under four weeks old, or its meat. The meat is widely described as tasting like dark chicken.

Syllabub – An English dessert comprised mainly of whipped cream sweetened with sugar and flavoured with sherry, brandy, or Cointreau. Lemon zest, fruit preserves or puree may also be swirled into the cream.

That’s all for this week see you in two weeks for the letter C (organiC)

Please stay safe as it seems in some places lockdowns are being introduced again…not good xx

About Carol Taylor:

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and well being.

The environment is also something I am passionate about and there will be more on this on my blog this year

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…Then, I will be happy!

Please stay safe and well and follow your governments safety guidelines remember we are all in this together xxx