Category Archives: The reverse culinary alphabet

The Culinary Alphabet with a twist…The letter H (noocH)

Good morning everyone and Pete… time for another post which is this crazy idea from one of my fellow scribes …but food fun…I have left out squash as It has mentioned in a few previous posts…

Blanch:

A cooking process whereby food, usually a vegetable or fruit, is scalded in boiling water, removed after a brief, timed interval, and finally plunged into iced water or placed under cold running water to halt the cooking process.

Blowtorch: ( Culinary)

Think Creme Brulee with that lovely crackle on top…think meringues with just a touch of brown, think a lovely sear on your meat or fish without drying up the flesh, think skinning your peppers and tomatoes if you are running out of time…you can even heat up your knife to cut frozen meat…

Bortsch:

Hot or cold Borsch is a lovely thing I was taught how to make it by my Russian neighbour when I lived in Phuket they also taught me the correct way to make and drink a Bloody Mary the Russian way….hmmmm…that certainly involved less tomato juice and more Vodka…

Butterscotch:

Butterscotch is a type of soft-crack sweet created by slowly heating butter and brown sugar together. Just like caramel, the brown sugar molecules break down and, thanks to the addition of molasses in the sugar, caramelize into a richer, deeper flavour than classic caramel.

Butterscotch is cooked at a lower temperature which means as sweets/candy is is not quite as brittle as toffee if making a butterscotch pudding which used be one of my favourites as a child and writing this I am thinking that maybe I should recreate my mother’s pudding it also can make a lovely drizzle over ice cream or cheesecakes or it is lovely stirred into a biscuit/cookie mix…

To create a sauce, topping, or candy, additional ingredients like vanilla, salt, and cream can be added once caramelization has occurred.

Cheesecloth:

Cheesecloth is gauze-like, woven cotton cloth. Its original purpose was for making and wrapping homemade cheese, but it has become a useful tool in other recipes as well. It is used as a strainer when a fine sieve is needed, as a cover for roast turkey or chicken to keep the bird moist, and is made into little pouches for herbs for seasoning meats, broth, soups, and other dishes. Cheesecloth is something we may not often have in our kitchen. If you don’t have any on hand, luckily there are plenty of alternatives. Just make sure the item is clean before cooking.

If you don’t have cheesecloth you can use a coffee filter, a mesh bag, a fine wire sieve I have even heard of chefs using pantyhose…as long as it is fine almost any cotton fabric will do…luckily it is one item I can easily obtain here.

Cornstarch:

Is a popular thickener although I prefer to use Arrowroot, rice flour or tapioca flour…potato water can also be used as a thickener. Cornstarch is mostly flavorless, and thus adds texture rather than taste. It’s a bland powder that’s usually used to thicken dishes. However, Cornstarch is considered a refined carb, meaning that it has undergone extensive processing and been stripped of its nutrients.

Eggwash:

Is a mixture of beaten egg and liquid (usually water or milk) that is brushed onto baked goods like pastries before baking. It adds shine and color and helps to seal up edges.

It is also one of the simplest jobs which children love to do in the kitchen…

Ghivech:

A Romanian vegetable stew …A mixed vegetable stew with lots of herbs.

Goulash:

A Hungarian stew or soup of meat and vegetables flavoured with paprika thick and hearty it dates back to medieval times. One of Hungary’s National Dishes. Sometimes served with sour cream and always with crusty bread, it was originally a dush eaten by shepherds.

 

Horseradish:

Spicy and an excellent accompaniment to beef…Love it or hate it Horseradish is a wonderful accompaniment to beef and beets. For some lovely recipes see my cookery column on Smorgasbord.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2018/04/25/smorgasbord-blog-magazine-the-food-and-cookery-column-with-carol-taylor-horseradish/

Hooch:

Hooch, a colloquial term for an alcoholic distilled beverage. Moonshine, illicitly distilled spirits.

Murgh:

Is the name for chicken…who hasn’t loved the chicken Murgh on an Indian restaurant menu…

Nooch:

This was a new one for me I have heard not tried Nutritional Yeast and Nooch is short for nutritional yeast. Nutritional yeast is deactivated yeast and can be bought in the form of powder or flakes. It is often used for vegan sauces because of its super cheesy taste. Nutritional yeast is something that should not be missed in a vegan household.

Peach:

Who doesn’t love a nice juicy peach they can be eaten raw, made into a beautiful dessert, or grilled with olive oil, fresh thyme, black pepper, and basil they are a wonderful thing…

Radish:

The root of a member of the mustard family, radishes have a peppery flavour and a crisp, crunchy texture. Among the most popular varieties is the small, cherry-sized common variety which has red skin and white flesh (the French Breakfast radish is a variation on this type, and has an elongated shape with a deep pink skin that fades to white at the roots).

You can also find black radishes, popular in eastern Europe, which are more strongly flavoured, as well as large white mooli or daikon radishes, which are shaped like carrots. They are popular in Asian cookery and have a very mild flavour.

Radishes are rich in folic acid and potassium and are a good source of vitamin B6, magnesium, riboflavin, and calcium.

Redbush:

Is one of my favourite teas…also commonly known as Rooibos it is low in tannin and is caffeine-free.

Saltbush:

From red bush to Saltbush which is a lovely native vegetable salty and herby they can be blanched, sautéed, wrapped around meat or fish, used in salads, or for stuffing poultry. Alternatively, they may be dried and used as a herb or sprinkle.

Sourdough:

Sourdough bread is a lovely thing and it said that many people are cultivating their sourdough culture due to their quarantine which is good as it makes lovely bread and even the discard can be used in many ways like pancakes for example…It took me a few goes before I got mine properly started but I learnt a lot about flour and its differences which has improved my baking.

Spinach:

Loaded with nutrients and antioxidants Spinach is classed as a very healthy vegetable…and we all remember Popeye and the now-iconic ads. It can be eaten raw in salads, lightly sauteed in butter or olive oil…Serve it wilted in pasta or in an omelette or quiche…a very versatile dark green leafy vegetable…Our families favourite recipe using spinach is this spicy green chicken recipe…

Succotash:

Succotash is a culinary dish consisting primarily of sweet corn with lima beans or other shell beans. Other ingredients may be added including corned beef, potatoes, turnips, salt pork, tomatoes, multi-coloured sweet peppers, and okra.

Tabbouleh:

Tabouli salad or Tabbouleh is a simple Mediterranean salad of very finely chopped vegetables, lots of fresh parsley and bulgur wheat, …

Tempeh:

Made from fermented soya beans it is a traditional Indonesian product ..a plant-based protein source..not something I have used or tried have you?

Waterbath:

What is it..put simply it is a pan of water put in your oven and used to cook cheesecakes(it stops) then cracking…creme caramel, baked custard anything which requires a slow even cooking …

Just a tip: If you use a springform pan for a recipe that calls for a water bath, wrap the pan first with aluminum foil to prevent water from leaking through the bottom. Use two or three sheets in a crisscross pattern for best results.

That’s all for this week see you in two weeks for the letter I (enokI)…

Please stay safe as it seems in some places lockdowns are being introduced again…not good xx

About Carol Taylor:

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and well being.

The environment is also something I am passionate about and there will be more on this on my blog this year

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…Then, I will be happy!

Please stay safe and well and follow your governments safety guidelines remember we are all in this together xxx

 

The Culinary Alphabet with a twist…The letter B(herB)

Welcome to my new series…food-related of course…I was challenged way back at the beginning of this year by Pete…who suggested that maybe I should use ingredients and cooking methods where the letter used, for example, was the last letter i.e Pizza(A)…

On reflection, I think it was a good idea although how I will fare when I get to some letters I am not sure if it will be doable but I will give it a good go… I am not one to back of if challenged…hehe

Today it starts with Bicarb(B)

Bicarb – Also known as Sodium bicarbonate, aka baking soda…Baking soda tends to be the American name, while in the UK and in Australia we tend to call it bicarbonate of soda (Bicarb).

Bicarb, or baking soda, is an alkali that is used to raise soda bread and full-flavoured cakes such as gingerbread, fruit cake, chocolate cake, and carrot cake. It needs an acid (as well as moisture) to activate it so is often combined with cream of tartar, yogurt, buttermilk, or milk.

Sally Yeast Free Soda Bread

Bicarbonate of soda gives off carbon dioxide, which expands in a mixture. Once the mixture is cooked, the carbon dioxide is replaced by air, leaving a light cake or bread.

As with all raising agents, use the amount specified in the recipe. Adding extra bicarbonate of soda can result in a peaked or collapsed cake, a strong unpleasant flavour, and a greenish tinge.

Carob –  I have just learned something I thought carob was another name for cocoa well it isn’t…Carob powder and carob chips are similar to cocoa powder and choc chips in colour, however, carob is less bitter and has a naturally sweet flavour.

It is also caffeine-free and higher in fibre…It can also be used as an alternative to cocoa powder and by adding coffee it will also taste like chocolate.

Carob bean juice can also be used as a safe and effective way to treat diarrhea in children.

Crab – Who doesn’t love a crab sandwich or a crab curry? I know I do … There are thousands of different types of crabs that are divided into over 850 species. Most varieties of crab have a hard outer shell (called an exoskeleton), 3 walking legs on either side of their body, and 2 pinching claws.

crab-1934857_1280

Of course, like other foods, there are always the more popular of the species which we love to eat…King crabs are one of the most common and best types of edible crabs due to their large size and delicate taste.

Of the smaller crabs, the one which is very popular here are Blue crabs which are a type of swimming crab that have 2 paddle-like feet to help it swim. In fact, its scientific name literally means ‘beautiful savory swimmer.’

Crumb – a very small piece of bread, cake, or biscuit…which has many uses it can be used to coat meat or fish or as a sprinkling with some cheese on top of an au gratin…

bread crumb-2542308_640

Biscuit or cake crumbs can be used as a fruit topping or toasted and used to top ice cream or as a decoration for a dessert…So whatever you do don’t waste anything like this as it can be made into crumbs…

Corncob – the part of the maize plant on which the grain grows…

corncob-1031202_640

A popular and tasty vegetable which can be boiled, baked, BBQ’d…Cut from the cob and made into creamed corn, or eaten as a side or a topping for a jacket potato it is very versatile, plentiful, and tasty…

Curbdelivery (food industry term):      The practice of delivering an order in bulk to the pavement in front of a retail store; or from the tailgate of a truck to an adjacent platform

Herb – A Culinary herb, which is available fresh or dried, include basil, bay leaf, chervil, marjoram, mint, oregano, parsley, rosemary, sage, savory, tarragon and thyme. Used for their aromatic properties, flavour, and texture.

Hobnob- A New World style of wine that is evenly balanced, fruit-forward, with a rich mouthfeel and hints of oak. 5 popular varieties – Pinot Noir, California Chardonnay, Merlot, Red Blend, and Cabernet Sauvignon. …

Hobnob is also a biscuit/cookie …It is the brand name of a commercial biscuit. They are made from rolled oats and jumbo oats, similar to a flapjack-digestive biscuit hybrid, and are among the most popular British biscuits. McVitie’s launched Hobnobs in 1985 and a milk chocolate variant in 1987. Wikipedia

Honeycomb- A honeycomb is a mass of hexagonal prismatic wax cells built by honey bees in their nests to contain their larvae and stores of honey and pollen.

fresh wild honey comb

 

This is my lovely fresh honeycomb…

Honeycomb is also a lovely sweet which can be covered in chocolate crunchie or used in desserts…

crunchie bar-2201990_640

 

Made with golden syrup, sugar, and bicarb it is fun to make and although very sweet good to eat as a treat or stir some through your ice cream.

Ingredients:

  • butter, for greasing
  • 200g caster sugar
  • 5 tbsp golden syrup
  • 2 tsp bicarbonate of soda

Let’s Cook!

Butter a 20cm square tin.

Mix 200g caster sugar and 5 tbsp golden syrup in a deep saucepan and stir over a gentle heat until the sugar has melted. Try not to let the mixture bubble until the sugar grains have disappeared.

Once completely melted, turn up the heat a little and simmer until you have an amber-coloured caramel (this won’t take long), then as quickly as you can turn off the heat, tip in 2 tsp bicarbonate of soda and beat in with a wooden spoon until it has all disappeared and the mixture is foaming. Scrape into the tin immediately but be careful as the mixture will be very hot indeed..be careful…

The mixture will continue bubbling in the tin, simply leave it, and in about 1 hr – 1 hr 30 mins the honeycomb will be hard and ready to crumble or snap into chunks.

Enjoy!

Kebab- I love a good homemade kebab either formed around a skewer and then cooked on the BBQ or if I am making chicken kebabs then I use lemongrass as my skewers and then they impart a lovely lemon flavour. or marinate your meat and skewer it with onions and peppers and pop on the barbie…

chicken-kebabs-salad-rice

or make your own kebab meat like I did the other week and make your own pitta with love green chilli peppers.

Lamb- A meat I cannot always get here and to my way of thinking lamb, if it is lovely spring lamb, is best eaten with jersey royal potatoes and fresh peas and beans…

Rhubarb –A perennial plant with thick red stalks and large green leaves that are poisonous. The stalks have a tart flavor and are often used in pies and tarts. My favourite rhubarb pie and custard.

rhubarb-1350969_640

They do have absolutely glorious looking leaves but never ever be tempted as they are poisonous to eat…

Scab – Causes rough scabby patches on the potato skin and the flesh underneath. It is unsightly and can affect storage potential. Any potatoes with scab should be used quickly.

Shrub – An old-fashioned sweetened fruit drink, sometimes spiked with liquor which seems to be having a revival over recent years. All you have to do is make a flavoured vinegar for wonderful drinks with soda and ice or with cocktails…

Sparerib – The long cut of meat from the lower breast bone of the hog. Spareribs are best cooked slowly so that their fat can be rendered and they can become tender.

Pork-ribs-asian-flavours

These were absolutely delicious…finger bowls required and a bib…

Squab –  is a young domestic pigeon, typically under four weeks old, or its meat. The meat is widely described as tasting like dark chicken.

Syllabub – An English dessert comprised mainly of whipped cream sweetened with sugar and flavoured with sherry, brandy, or Cointreau. Lemon zest, fruit preserves or puree may also be swirled into the cream.

That’s all for this week see you in two weeks for the letter C (organiC)

Please stay safe as it seems in some places lockdowns are being introduced again…not good xx

About Carol Taylor:

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and well being.

The environment is also something I am passionate about and there will be more on this on my blog this year

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…Then, I will be happy!

Please stay safe and well and follow your governments safety guidelines remember we are all in this together xxx