Tag Archives: Crumpets

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Carol Taylor’s – Culinary A – Z Rewind – ‘C’ for Calabash, Cajun, Curry, Cloud Eggs, Chilli, and Calamari

Welcome to a repeat of the wonderful Culinary A – Z  where today I am taking you on a culinary tour of the letter C …Sally is very kindly rewinding this series…thank you, Sally…I am showcasing some of the amazing variety of food we have available to us today from around the world, plus delicious recipes like Thai Squid Salad, and Cloud Eggs to showcase them. I hope you enjoy!

Once again thank you, Sally…to read the original post please click the highlighted link below…

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2022/07/20/smorgasbord-blog-magazine-carol-taylors-culinary-a-z-rewind-c-for-calabash-cajun-curry-cloud-eggs-chilli-and-calamari/

 

CarolCooks2…National Celery Month…Home cured bacon using Celery Juice…

March is National Celery Month…

I love celery …celery which is in season and grown and not forced as when it is forced it is green and bitter-tasting…

Celery contains a plant compound called apigenin, it has long played a role in traditional Chinese medicine as an anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antiviral, and antioxidant agent…

For me eating celery with crumpets and shellfish is how we used to eat it for Sunday Tea…an abiding childhood memory…my mother used to add it to her stews and casseroles and we used to fight over the hard, crunchy end bit of the celery…most of the time my dad won but occasionally he let us win…

Celery is mostly made up of water but it does provide fibre for our bodies…Combining celery with cucumber, apple, spinach, and lemon can produce a tasty and healthful smoothie.

Celery Juice also has naturally occurring nitrates and for this reason, I used the juice to cure my own bacon…

I have also been experimenting with various different ways of curing bacon and ham which may be more healthy…Bacon contains nitrates which some people have an aversion to using or it causes headaches and other adverse symptoms.

Today I am using celery juice..just put the celery into the juicer and out the other side and viola this lovely vibrant green juice.

Now celery also contains nitrates but they are naturally occurring nitrates although for some people it may still cause headaches but if your aversion is to chemicals only then celery may be a better way to cure your bacon.

I used 2 Kilo’s Pork Belly.

For every Kilo of Pork use I used:

  • 2 parts rock salt to 1 part sugar.
  • 4 cloves garlic.
  • 2 bay leaves
  • A bunch of Lemon Thyme.
  • 20/30 Mustard Seeds,
  • 12 Pepper Corns,
  • Celery Juice as required to make the mix damp.

Lets Cook!

Finely slice bay Leaves and lightly crush with other spices in Pestle & Mortar.

Combine with Sugar and Salt and mix with liberal amounts of celery juice until damp.

Rub into the Pork.

Belly pork bacon Naturallly cured

Place Pork in a sealed container or bag ( I used a brining bag). Turn halfway through the week. That is why I like using brining bags as it is much easier to turn the pork belly over.

Store in the fridge for 5 Days.

After 5 days remove the belly pork and wash thoroughly.

Cook in the oven @ 100 C for 2 hours. Cool and slice.

Home cured belly Streaky bacon

It also looks lovely and pink ( no grey) which means the natural nitrates in the celery juice had worked their magic.

All I need now is a homemade smoker and some lovely flavoured woods. Maybe use some maple syrup, honey, someone suggested coffee..some nice tea springs to my mind so many options…A different blend of herbs or cut of meat…

Have you made your own bacon and if you did what did you use?

Now the tester…How will it taste?

Home cured Bacon frying

Naturally cured with celery juice

It smells like bacon, looks like bacon and made a lovely sandwich….  Most households have some who love thick bacon and some who like thinner bacon the beauty of making your own bacon is everyone can have their bacon sliced to their own requirements …How cool is that?

Celery can make a crunchy, tasty addition to many dishes, and its seeds and extracts may offer a range of health benefits. It can also make a handy low-calorie snack…it pairs well with cheeses, hummus and peanut butter…for a healthy snack…

Braised with some good homemade stock, butter and black pepper it makes a healthy side dish for a main.

Chopped it can be added to salad, soups…it adds a nice crunch to salads and is a great addition to soups and stews.

Celery Seeds…

These small brown seeds can be deceiving as celery seeds are nutrient-dense and particularly rich in calcium, manganese, and iron. They’re low in calories and provide relatively equal amounts of carbs, protein, and fat…a versatile spice with many uses…sold as whole seeds, crushed, or as a ground spice. Ground celery seed is often referred to as celery powder.

Sprinkle them on your salad for a flavour boost…Mix them into hearty casseroles.

Use them as a spice rub for grilled meat…mix them into your barbeque dishes like coleslaw or potato salad…Add them to your pickling recipes…I always add them to my pickled onions and garlic…

Interestingly, some people use ground celery seeds to make tea. You can make your own by pouring boiling water over 1 tablespoon (6.5 grams) of ground seeds and steeping the mixture for roughly 10 minutes. Strain the seeds from the water and enjoy…

It is worth noting that traditional medicine and most research has focused on celery extracts rather than the consumption of celery sticks.

Thank you for joining me today…what is your favourite way to eat celery…I look forward to your comments as always …x

The Culinary Alphabet …..A-Z…Series 3… the letter M…

Welcome to series 3 of the Culinary Alphabet A-Z…Where the middle letter is M…

Nothing is as it seems here…this new series is the brainchild of Chel Owens who writes at A wife, My Verse, and Every Little Thingmy followers are so good to me they think up all sorts of permutations of the Alphabet for me to blog about…not sure if they want me to call it quits or what they will come up with next…Chel like Pete was, however, will be called on to make her contribution every two weeks…they don’t get off scot-free…however, as Chel is on a baby break she is exempt for now…be well Chel xx

So what’s in store? In this series the A, B, C, etc will be the middle letter, for example, Cajun, Lemon, Ackee and Yucca… how easy that will be who knows I am sure some of the letters of the alphabet could cause the grey matter to rebel or implode…haha…I also don’t want to use plurals to form a word as I may need that word for another letter and it’s sort of cheating I think…unless of course I really get stuck…which I am sure will happen…

Today it is words where the middle letter is M... not so easy or as many as last time but I found a few… I love scrambled eggs for breakfast maybe with a crumpet…

Let’s go and see what I have found…

Camembert…

There is nothing like a baked Camembert cheese, a glass of wine, fresh-cooked crusty bread maybe some walnuts…delicious on a sunny day or a cold winters evening…this French Cheese is made from cow’s milk and produced in Normandy in Northwest of France.

Carambola…

More commonly known as Star fruit or 5 fingers fruit…it is a beautiful sunny yellow colour with the most delicious smell…it can be eaten raw as it is, it is often used as a decoration on desserts as it is so very pretty…The entire fruit is edible it has firm, crunchy flesh and is quite juicy. The taste is likened to that of a grape.

It can be made into relishes, preserves and juice drinks…one of my favourites is this beautiful relish.

Star Fruit Relish:

Ingredients

• 8 cups of star fruit, thinly sliced and any seeds removed.
• 1/2 tsp salt
• 1 1/2 cups cider vinegar
• 1 tbsp whole cloves tied in a muslin bag and slightly crushed.
• 4 cups of sugar
• 1/2 tsp ground nutmeg( optional)

Let’s Cook!

Wash and thinly slice the star fruit removing any seeds. Cover with the cider vinegar and stand overnight.

Drain the vinegar add sugar, salt and clove bag. Cook gently until the relish starts to thicken then allow to stand overnight.

In the morning remove the spice bag and reheat the mix after adding the nutmeg if used and bring back to the boil.

If you plan to store the star fruit chutney then omit the nutmeg as it will turn the relish a brown colour although it does add another dimension to the taste.

Put into hot jars and process in a hot water bath for 10 minutes.

Enjoy with some cold meats or on bread and butter.

Catmint…

Also commonly known as Catnip and catswort it is well known for its popularity and effects on cats…it is also a great insect repellant.

For us…Tea is one of the more common ways catmint is taken. The plant’s flowering tops are steeped in water (unlike traditional tea, you do NOT want to put catnip in boiling water, bring the water to a boil and remove from heat for a minute before beginning the steeping process) and consumed like any other herbal tea.

Chambre…

Chambre or Chapea is a bean, rice and meat stew…a hearty traditional Dominican lunch it is made like all stews in one pot….just like my mum’s recipe every household has their own family tradition recipe for a delicious, hearty Chambre.

Crumble…

Who doesn’t love a nice bowl of fruit crumble it can be made with almost any fruit or a mixture of fruits with a lovely crumble topping served with a bowl of custard or ice cream it is a lovely thing…comfort food at its best…What is your favourite crumble? ..a hard choice… I love gooseberry, rhubarb or a nice tart apple crumble…

Apple and Mulberry Crumble Recipe

Crumpet…

Toasted over an open fire is one of my abiding childhood memories…served with lashings of butter which inevitably drips down your chin..it is a wonderful thing on a winters day…

I also had one of my biggest and messiest cooking disasters the first time I attempted to make them from scratch…Note to self use a bigger jug next time…lol

Crumpet Recipe.

Ferment…

To ferment…my yeast above certainly did…lol…I love fermented foods like kimchi, sauerkraut, kombucha, sourdough bread, miso, kefir to name but a few …of course not forgetting the obvious also our wine does ladies…

The earliest record of fermentation dates back as far as 6000 B.C. in the rich soils of the Fertile Crescent—and nearly every civilization since has included at least one fermented food in its culinary heritage. Global cultures have crafted unique flavours and traditions around fermentation from Korean kimchi and Indian chutneys to sauerkraut, yoghurt and cheese.

Of course, now it has it is labelled probiotics the marketing guru’s in word and the like but it is all down to fermentation.

Gumbo…

New Orleans and Gumbo…sold in a backstreet cafe or on the poshest of menus you will find Creole gumbo, filé gumbo, cowan gumbo, chicken gumbo, smoked sausage gumbo, hot sausage gumbo, onion gumbo…and many more as with all traditional recipes there are the inevitable variations and everyone’s mother or grandmother makes the best…the origins and evolution of the dish are highly speculative. The name derives from a West African word for okra, suggesting that gumbo was originally made with okra. The use of filé (dried and ground sassafras leaves) was a contribution of the Choctaws and, possibly, other local tribes. Roux has its origin in French cuisine, although the roux used in gumbos is much darker than its Gallic cousins…putting all that aside it is a beautiful thing hearty and warming…

Lemon…

The fruit of the Lemon tree…this beautiful yellow citrus fruit is used for culinary and non-culinary purposes throughout the world, primarily for its juice, which has both culinary and cleaning uses.

Oval shaped and bright yellow in colour the fruits are acidic and sour…Lemons are high in vitamin C, fibre, and various beneficial plant compounds…These nutrients are responsible for several health benefits.

Limes…

Limes are small, round and green and are used extensively in Asian cuisine…the lime has a slightly more bitter taste than the lemon. Limes can also be used as a one to one replacement to lemons…In my recipes when I state limes ..the lemon can be used the difference in the taste is negligible although I have now got used to using limes which I prefer…

Marshmallow…

Where chocolate is the guilty pleasure of many..marshmallows are mine…not the Haribo ones they are just sweet nothing but the classic English marshmallows…toasted or on hot chocolate or just straight from the bag they hit the spot…

A confectionary is typically made from sugar, water and gelatin…

Marmite…

I’m in the…  Love It! camp although it is either a love or hate spread on hot buttered toast it is fabulous…My Aussie cousins have Vegemite…I am a Marmite girl.

What is Marmite and how is it made? Marmite is a dark, thick, yeast extract spread. It’s made from concentrated yeast extract, which is a by-product of brewing beer. It was conceived in 1902 when the Marmite Food Company opened a small factory in Burton-on-Trent – where it still resides today.

Over the last few years, Marmite has produced different flavours as a limited edition around Christmas. There is a Christmas Edition. There has been a Guinness flavoured Marmite, Chill flavoured, XO flavoured…I have also heard tell that a PB and Marmite one is on the shelves me I have stuck to the original so far…

Muskmelon…

Muskmelon also called nutmeg melon is a member of the gourd family…with its musky, orange juicy flesh it is one of my favourites. Rich in Vitamin C and Potassium it is a delightfully refreshing fruit.

Oatmeal…

To me it’s Porridge …I love a hot warming bowl of porridge Oats with brown sugar or a lovely fruit compote…maybe some walnuts, raisins and a drizzle of honey…

Scottish traditionalists allow only oats, water and salt although full-fat milk makes a rich porridge. A ratio of one part of milk to two of water has been recommended as a happy medium. A little salt added towards the end of cooking is essential, whether or not the porridge is sweetened.

Pomes…

Which fruits are pomes? …apples, pears, loquats, medlars, crab apples and quinces are all types of pome. A botany term a pome is an accessory fruit composed of one or more carpels surrounded by accessory tissue.

Ramen Noodles…

Ramen are thin, wheat-based noodles made from wheat flour, salt, water, and kansui, a form of alkaline water. The dough is risen before being rolled. They were imported from China during the Meiji period. There is also a lot of controversy surrounding Ramen noodles but like anything, there are the commercially produced instant noodles with high sodium levels, MSG and TBHQ, little or no fibre content to talk about and then there are healthy alternatives to Ramen Noodles like vegetable noodles or spirals. … For real noodle alternatives, try udon or soba noodles. These are low in sodium and fat and make for a great alternative in ramen bowls.

Saltimbocca…

The original version of this dish is saltimbocca alla Romana (“saltimbocca Roman-style”), which consists of veal, prosciutto and sage, rolled up and cooked in dry white wine and butter.

Scrambled Eggs…

One of my favourite ways to eat eggs…softly scrambled with some freshly toasted bread or with smoked salmon as a treat.

Soymilk…

Very popular here Soy milk is a plant-based non-dairy beverage, often consumed as an alternative to milk. Most soy milk sold on the market are fortified but read the label to make sure yours contains calcium and vitamin D. (Soy milk doesn’t naturally contain calcium.)

Sumac…

Made from the dried and ground berries of the wild sumac flower, sumac is a tangy spice with a sour, acidic flavour reminiscent of lemon juice. This fragrant spice is used to brighten up dry rubs, spice blends like za’atar, and dressings.

Sumac is a widely used, essential spice in Middle Eastern and Mediterranean cooking It pairs well with vegetables, grilled lamb, chicken and fish.

That’s all for the letter M…Thank you for joining me today I hope you have found something new and some of your favourites…xx

Until tomorrow, where I will be back in my kitchen cooking from scratch, have a lovely day xx

 

Smorgasbord Food Column – Carol Taylor’s Green Kitchen – #Crumpets, #Baking Soda, #Minced Garlic and Egg Boxes uses. — Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

Good Morning from sunny Thailand…I am over @ Sally’s today with my green
 
Kitchen…I do hope you enjoy this new series…Please head over and have a browse
 
Sally and I will make you very welcome…See you there x

Hello and welcome to Carol Taylor’s Green Kitchen I cannot begin to tell you how delighted I am to be back with a brand- new column at Smorgasbord Magazine… and how welcome you are making me feel. I am passionate about cooking from scratch using fresh ingredients, the environment and ensuring that the food I […]

Smorgasbord Food Column – Carol Taylor’s Green Kitchen – #Crumpets, #Baking Soda, #Minced Garlic and Egg Boxes uses. — Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

Saturday Snippets…

Here we are again…I hope you all have had a productive week and are still safe and well…Time to tell you what has made me laugh, cry or cringe this week…time to tell you what I have been cooking…of course…

Yesterday was a marathon cook in…I had made bread the day before yesterday it was mango chutney and the tomatoes, garlic and peppers in the oven for the tomato and red pepper soup more coconut ice was requested and I also made a strawberry mousse using my mum’s recipe that was as well as brunch and making flatbreads for the Indian curry.

Today is also National Cucumber Day and National Kitchen Klutzes Day…

Cucumbers …well I always thought of cucumber as a vegetable it is, however, a fruit…low in calories and cucumbers are great pickled...they contain a good amount of water and soluble fibre…I have even seen them stir-fried here…

I didn’t get to try that one we were at a wake and the ladies were preparing mountains of food and one of dishes was a huge pot of cucumber and other vegetables with aromatics being stir-fried over a fire…I am also guessing huge amounts of chillies went into the mix as well…so much food I missed tasting that one…

Cucumbers are about 95% water and a good snack if you are counting calories and they will keep you hydrated I always keep some in the fridge as the grandson loves to snack on cucumbers they are easy to eat the cucumbers her here are small so a nice size…

I use them mainly in salads or pickle them and I don’t mind a cucumber sandwich although I haven’t had one of those for a while…sandwiches are not something eaten very much here.

As it is also kitchen klutz day I better fess up…I have burnt the eggs and the chutney and also should have used a bigger container…

Crumpet malfunction the jug runneth over …The recipe…

Kitchen Shortcuts...

No peeling potatoes…Yeah!

We all have our favourite family go to films don’t we where we open the prosecco and the chocolates and just binge-watch for a couple of hours…I didn’t realise how long ago this was…It was 1978 when the film “Grease” opened, starring John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John it was based on the 1971 musical…

Named after the 1950s United States working-class youth subculture known as greasers, the musical is set in 1959 at fictional Rydell High School.

By Jim Jacobs and Warren Casey. …  its original production was in Chicago, Grease was a raunchy, raw, aggressive, vulgar show then… Subsequent productions sanitized it and toned it down. Finally in1980: The Broadway musical Grease closed after 3,883 performances.

The Grease we know and love was born…

It was hard to pick a favourite…Tell me about it Stud…Rizzo…Summer Nights…

Mother nature is awesome …Cruel, marvellous and just downright scary…

Luckily no lives were lost but homes and possessions were…just watching it was just unbelievable but it happened and there was a happy ending for one little furry pet…

I don’t think anyone is going to forget the year 2020...It has just gone from one thing to another and in quick succession, I am sure I am not alone when I wonder how it will all end…we are now in the month of June and it shows no sign of things slowing down…

Indeed you couldn’t make it up, could you?

Has it taught me anything…?… Yes, it has taught me how fragile our hold on life is…It has taught me how kind people can be…it has taught me how many things in life we rely on …it has taught me who I can rely on…it has also shown me things I really don’t wish to witness …a side where if people looked at history as a whole instead of cherry-picking the parts to fit their causes…the cancel culture has got seriously out of hand…Little Britain,The League of Gentlemen have all come under unwarranted scrutiny and have been delegated to the memory hole…The kangaroo court of correct thinking has found these to be offensive… they are comedy classics..Use the off switch…it has shown me how much is really wrong with this world and so much which is right…

I was  saddened to hear that Welsh singer Ricky Valance has died aged 84 following a battle against dementia.

An agent for the Tell Laura I Love Her star confirmed the sad news on Friday.

Ricky was born in Ynysddu, Monmouthshire, Wales in April 1939 and was named David Spencer and began a career in music after initially serving in the military.

R.I.P….Remembered through his music…

Take care all of you…xxx

That’s all for Saturday Snippets this week…Stay safe and be well…Wash your hands and please wear a mask when out in public and practise social distancing.

About Carol Taylor: 

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and wellbeing.

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…….Then, I will be happy!

Thank you once again for reading this post I hope you all have a fabulous week and stay safe these are troubling times xx

 

 

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Food Column – Carol Taylor – A – Z of Food – ‘C’ for Calabash, Cajun, Curry, Cloud Eggs, Chilli, and Calamari

This series is my baby and one I have loved writing and researching…Thanx to Sally it is getting another airing slightly revised in places…I hope you enjoy…xxx

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

Welcome to the series from Carol Taylor, the wonderful A – Z of Food and I am looking forward to expanding my knowledge of wonderful ingredients across the food groups, spices and herbs over the year.

The letter C in my journey through the culinary alphabet…I do hope you enjoy it I certainly am it is quite interesting especially now I know that Pork crackling something most of us love is number 6 in the top 100 of foods which are beneficial to your health…Lots of fat but good fat and plenty of vitamins ..so fill your boots… well not quite …Moderation is best but no need to go on a guilt trip it is ok to enjoy it now and again.

Californian Sheep’s head…

A saltwater fish which belongs to the wrasse family. The wrasses are a family, Labridae, of marine fish, many of which are brightly…

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