Tag Archives: Rujak Sauce

CarolCooks2 weekly roundup…July 11th-17th July 2021…#Plastic Free July, #Swan Upping, Music,#Feijoa Fruit “Green Gold”…

Plastic Free July, Be the Change, Music, A-Z and Feijoa Fruit “Green Gold” and #Swan Upping.

Welcome to this week’s edition of my weekly roundup of posts…Especially for you just in case you missed a few posts during this last week…Time is marching on…It is now officially rainy season here so there will definitely be some dancing in the rain…

July…for my English family and readers it is wall to wall sunshine…enjoy while it lasts…July is also the month when the phenomenon of Crop Circles begin to appear…in the past, there have been some spectacular ones and no one has a definitive answer as to how or why…

These crop circles are quite spectacular..absolutely symmetrical…perfect… it’s like someone has dropped a huge stencil and cut around it…How, when and why is still a mystery as they suddenly appear…This one is in Wilshire, UK…

On the River Thames in July the census of swans takes place called the “Swan Upping”…Swans are counted and marked on a 70-mile 5-day journey up the River Thames…

Swan upping dates from the 12th Century when the Crown claimed ownership of all unmarked mute swans in a bid to ensure a ready supply for royal banquets.

Swans are no longer eaten but the practice of counting and marking the swans on the River Thames still takes place in the third week of July every year.

Summer Colds can be the worst…A runny nose ..red and sore where you have wiped it so much or a winter cold something no one enjoys…Sally has some great advice on how we can help to avoid or lessen the symptoms of the common cold…#recommended read.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2021/07/08/smorgasbord-health-column-family-health-nothing-more-common-that-a-cold-by-sally-cronin/

Welcome to series 3 of the Culinary Alphabet A-Z…Where the middle letter is J…

Nothing is as it seems here…this new series is the brainchild of Chel Owens who writes at A wife, My Verse, and Every Little Thingmy followers are so good to me they think up all sorts of permutations of the Alphabet for me to blog about…not sure if they want me to call it quits or what they will come up with next…Chel like Pete was, however, will be called on to make her contribution every two weeks…they don’t get off scot-free…so I hope you have started brainstorming Chel…haha x

The letter J was a bit of a brain teaser…but there were a few and young Pete came up with one I hadn’t heard of Feijoas Fruit or “Green Gold” as the Kiwi’s call it…Thank you Pete it gave me an idea for Tropical Friday…

The Culinary Alphabet …..A-Z…Series 3… the letter J…

Onion Bajees…

Deliciously crispy spicy onion morsels that you can eat as a side to your Indian curry or as a snack with a lovely chutney or dip…I need to practise to get perfect little balls but they tasted good and got the thumbs up all round…I used Besan Flour which meant they are also gluten-free and the besan flout adds a nice nutty taste.

CarolCooks2…Week 15…in my Kitchen…made from scratch…Onion Bhajees…

Tropical Friday:…” Green Gold”

Feijoa fruit is a versatile fruit that is used in baking, confectionary, chutney, smoothies, salads and even for alcoholic drinks…To learn more just click the link and all will be revealed x

Tropical Friday…Feijoa Fruit “Green Gold”

Saturday Snippets: When is  Sandwich more than just a Sandwich…

Welcome to Saturday Snippets where I indulge my whimsy and my passions… maybe a tune or two…something which has caught my eye this last week…just anything out of the ordinary or extraordinary…

For the last few weeks, I have taken inspiration from something I have read or watched… this week and also because it just happens (if) it is lovely bread and delicious filling can be a wonderful thing…my chosen word is…Sandwich!

Saturday Snippets 17th July 2021…When is a sandwich not a sandwich?

Thank you so much for dropping by I always look forward to your visits and comments…Hope to see you here next week xx

The Culinary Alphabet …..A-Z…Series 3… the letter J…

 

Welcome to series 3 of the Culinary Alphabet A-Z…Where the middle letter is J…

Nothing is as it seems here…this new series is the brainchild of Chel Owens who writes at A wife, My Verse, and Every Little Thingmy followers are so good to me they think up all sorts of permutations of the Alphabet for me to blog about…not sure if they want me to call it quits or what they will come up with next…Chel like Pete was, however, will be called on to make her contribution every two weeks…they don’t get off scot-free…so I hope you have started brainstorming Chel…haha x

So what’s in store? In this series the A, B, C, etc will be the middle letter, for example, Aga, Cabbage, Fries and Yucca… how easy that will be who knows I am sure some of the letters of the alphabet could cause the grey matter to rebel or implode…haha…I also don’t want to use plurals to form a word as I may need that word for another letter and it’s sort of cheating I think…unless of course I really get stuck…which I am sure will happen…

Today it is words where the middle letter is J...fairly easy but not so many… it taxed my brain somewhat…Who doesn’t love  Onion Bhajees? variants: or less commonly bhajee or bhajji plural bhajis or bhajia also bhajias or bhajees or bhajjis…it gets complicated sometimes…sigh… but I had fun…Thanx Chel xx

Let’s go and see what I have found…

Onion Bhajees…

Originating from the South Indian state of Karnataka, a bhaji is a deep-fried snack similar to a fritter or tempura. … A popular street food, the onion bhaji consists of just two main ingredients: onions & chickpea flour.

Recipe Tomorrow fresh from my kitchen…

Cajun…

Exactly what is Cajun seasoning, you might ask? It’s a rustic seasoning blend that hails from Louisiana, the home of delicious Cajun cuisine. Everyone tends to have their own spin on it, but in general, it’s a spicy blend featuring lots of paprika, cayenne, garlic powder, pepper and oregano…delicious and spicy 🙂

Demijohns…

A bulbous narrow-necked bottle holding from 3 to 10 gallons of liquid, typically enclosed in a wicker cover.

Dijon…

Dijon mustard is a style of prepared mustard that originated in the city of Dijon, France. You will often see it used in vinaigrettes and sauces as well as putting the finishing touch on a sandwich. It is a pale yellow rather than the typical bright yellow American-style mustard. French-inspired dishes that feature Dijon mustard as an ingredient are referred to as “à la dijonnaise.”

Flapjacks…

In the United Kingdom, the Isle of Man, Ireland, and Newfoundland a flapjack refers to a baked bar, cooked in a flat oven tin and cut into squares or rectangles, made from rolled oats, fat (typically butter), brown sugar and usually golden syrup. In other English-speaking countries, the same item is called by different names, such as muesli bar, cereal bar, oat bar or (in Australia) a slice.

The snack is similar to the North American granola bar, and in the United States and most of Canada, the term flapjack is a widely-known but lesser-used term for pancake.

Goujons…

Are thin strips of chicken or fish coated in breadcrumbs and then fried or baked.

Our grandkids love what they call KFC chicken...As you know I cook from scratch, therefore, make my own …I either cut a chicken breast into slices or use chicken tenders, then dip in an egg wash and coat with homemade breadcrumbs…I then cook in batches in hot oil until cooked and golden brown then serve with sticky rice and freshly chopped vegetables normally cucumber and cabbage.

Jamjars…

Glass jars used not only for jam making but for pickles…I am not sure why they called jamjars as they have many uses for storage for pickled gherkin, other pickles, marmalade, sun-dried tomatoes, olives, jalapeño peppers, chutneys, pickled eggs, honey, and many others.. as well as jams, and have been around for centuries…jars can be used to hold solids too large to be removed from, or liquids too viscous to be poured through, a bottle’s neck;

My mother always would say get me some jamjars out of the cupboard she never referred to a jamjar as a  Mason Jar and neither have I…maybe mason jar is more of an American or European term…

Marijuana…or Cannabis as it is also known…

Did you know?

Chefs can now earn a Culinary Cannabis Certificate?…neither did I but they can…I have noticed baked goods for sale here which have the familiar leaf on them…I had to ask as I am not familiar with what it is…but I have noticed the leaf being very prominent on baked goods over the last few months…a sign of things to come…. where do I stand on this… medicinally if it helps I am ok with…as for the rest I am not…

Rujak Sauce…

This little dip is a recipe from Bali given to me by my grandson’s girlfriend, it is very easy to make but made more special by the addition of tamarind. 

Called Rujak sauce it is lovely with green mangoes.

  • Take 200 gm of palm sugar shaved.
  • 15 gm of tamarind flesh and 5 tbsp of water leave to infuse for 5 mins and then drain and keep the tamarind flavoured water.
  • 6 or more Thai chillies.
  • 1/4 tsp shrimp paste and 1/4tsp salt.

Blitz all these ingredients together and you have fiery little sauce.

Tajin Maharshi… is a flavourful Lybian dish…

Tajin Maharshi is usually the main meal, but for guests, stuffed vegetables are always just a side dish. It consists of a variety of stuffed vegetables such as bell peppers, tomatoes, aubergines, and courgettes. The filling is usually prepared with a combination of ground meat, onions, rice, and spices such as chiles, salt, pepper, turmeric, ginger, and cinnamon. Maharshi is a great make-ahead dish, as it tastes even better the next day, and warms up well.

Thank you so much for joining me today…J was quite hard and a bit of a struggle although I am sure there are some I have missed…next time it’s the letter K…a little easier…Baked, Baker and Cooking for example…

See you tomorrow where I will have some  Onion Bharjees fresh from the pan with the recipe see you tomoz xx

 

 

Saturday Snippets…16th January 2020…

 

Welcome to this weeks Saturday Snippets…in many ways, my favourite post of the week as I can indulge my whimsy…The healthy eating is..it is…starting slowly…the good news the Xmas cake is now eaten…the bad news is my neighbours gave us some lovely honey-roasted bananas yesterday..2 packs…xx

Did you know? While the world was sheltering last year and maybe people and children were beginning to think that nothing new and exciting happened…Well, it did… a new Monkey and the longest creature on earth was discovered last year…how cool is that?

The creature is more like a jellyfish than a worm and is actually a colonial organism made up of smaller, specialized polyps and medusoids, collectively known as zooids, which act like humans inside a submarine, each zooid managing a different physiological function such as propulsion or gastric function.

This week in my Kitchen…

The bread making is going well I am now tweaking the recipe by slowly increasing the amount of stone-ground whole wheat flour to my sandwich loaf ..so far so good I haven’t had to tweak the other ingredients yet although as I increase the ratio of whole wheat flour I will have to increase the liquid.

This is because the germ and bran that are present in whole wheat flour can absorb more liquid than the endosperm. … In general, the more whole wheat flour in the dough, the more water you will need to use.

Foccacia...was the new bread I made this week…for a first attempt it came out well the texture was good the size of my tin was not I should have used a bigger baking tin as the bread rose more than I anticipated…Recipe to follow next week…x

Home Baked Foccacia topped with parmesan cheese.

The one thing I do acknowledge though is cooking like many things is a learning curve especially with new recipes as ovens vary, humidity can affect baking so many varients which is why often when I try a new recipe I halve the ingredients and always follow the recipe exactly and if it comes out perfectly the first time that’s good… no tweaks required but often some tweaks are a given because of personal taste and that can be a big variable alongside other factors.

 National Food Days…it’s spicy hot chilly day…

It had to happen and who’s a happy bunny then? Moi…Its the red-hot day of the year…

The world’s chilli heads, heat-seekers and extreme eaters can take their passion to extremes. International Hot and Spicy Foods Day …There are habanero-eating challenges to fancy-dress contests and cook-offs of popular spicy hot recipes.

This little dip is a recipe from Bali given to me by my grandson’s girlfriend, it is very easy to make but made more special by the addition of tamarind. 

Called Rujak sauce it is lovely with mangoes.

  • Take 200 gm of palm sugar shaved.
  • 15 gm of tamarind flesh and 5 tbsp of water leave to infuse for 5 mins and then drain and keep the tamarind flavoured water.
  • 6 or more Thai chillies.
  • 1/4 tsp shrimp paste and 1/4tsp salt.

Blitz all these ingredients together and you have fiery little sauce.

There are so many different types, including Thai Birds Eye, Carolina Reapers, Ghost Peppers, Habanero, Red Cayenne Pepper, Serrano, Guajillo, Poblano, Peppadew, and much more. They all bring a different level of heat and a different type of flavour to dishes.

Among serious chilli lovers… it also re-kindles the great debate: which chilli pepper tops the official Scoville heat scale?

That crown goes to the…

#1: Carolina Reaper. 1,400,000 to 2,200,000 Scoville heat units.

The Washed Ashore Project:

A beautiful project or the artwork is… it also sends a message …This video only has one like and that is mine…please have look and if you like the art and the message please them a like.

Washed Ashore is a non-profit community art project founded by artist and educator, Angela Haseltine Pozzi in 2010. The project is based in Bandon, Oregon, where Angela first recognized the amount of plastic washing up on the beaches she loved and decided to take action. Since 2010, Washed Ashore has processed tons of plastic pollution from Pacific beaches to create monumental art that is awakening the hearts and minds of viewers to the global marine debris crisis.

Only In Thailand…

Bloggers Corner…Smorgasbord Blogger Daily…

Although my Fish Pie is featured here I am also sharing the post with two other fabulous cooks…I know you all know me but if you are not familiar with Amy and Dorothy please check them out as they both post some wonderful recipes…

Amy showcased Kalua Pork Loco MocoSpinach Salad with Pears and Walnuts and Dorothy showcased Roasted Shrimp Cocktail with Avocado and Melon all recipes which I am definitely going to try they sound delicious…So head over to Sally’s but after you have eaten or you will come away drooling and ravenous…xx

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2021/01/15/smorgasbord-blogger-daily-friday-15th-january-2021-recipes-dorothys-new-vintage-kitchen-amy-m-reade-carol-taylor/

This week’s …Weird Fruit

kiwano melon

Looking like something from outer space (and, in fact, it once made an appearance on Star Trek, Deep Space Nine as a Golana melon (episode name: “Time’s Orphan”).but the Kiwano melon is actually grown in Southern Africa, California and New Zealand. Nicknamed the “horned melon,” its yellow, stubby exterior encases a bright green, jelly-like fruit with edible seeds. The fruit has a citrusy flavour that some liken to a mix of cucumber, lime and banana.

Time for some Music…

January 1992-Eric Clapton

Eric Clapton unplugged session for MTV included a reworked acoustic version of Layla which earned the album 6 Grammy Awards including the award for Record of the Year.

Thank you for popping in today I hope you have enjoyed Saturday Snippets …as always I look forward to your comments as you all know I love to chat…Thanx Carol xx

Fruity Friday’s…The Tamarind

 

 

I just don’t know where the time goes it’s Friday again and this week I am showcasing the lovely Tamarind…The Tamarind is very plentiful here and used in many Thai dishes …I love just eating the fruit it has quite a sour taste but I like it…It is sold in little packs here on the markets the seeds already removed or as a paste to add to food. It is also sold dried and sugared as a snack food and although sugared is still has quite a sour taste…

This rather plain brown podded fruit does, however, have the capacity to elevate your food to something else.

Tamarind like many fruits and vegetables has a long history of healing and aiding stomach disorders and is used as a laxative.

Tamarind preparations are used for fevers, sore throats, inflammation of joints and sunstroke. The leaves dried or boiled are made into poultices to help reduce swollen joints, sprains, boils, haemorrhoids and conjunctivitis.

Tamarind is also great as a marinade for meat as it breaks down and tenderises tougher cuts of meat. It is used to make jams and syrups it is also one of the secret ingredients of Lea & Perrins  Worcestershire sauce which is a fermented sauce which has many uses.

Great for smoothies a mango and tamarind smoothie is very nice it also has many other culinary uses.

This little dip is a recipe from Bali given to me by my grandson’s girlfriend it is very easy to make but made more special by the addition of tamarind. 

Called Rujak sauce it is lovely with mangoes.

  • Take 200 gm of palm sugar shaved.
  • 15 gm of tamarind flesh and 5 tbsp of water leave to infuse for 5 mins and then drain and keep the tamarind flavoured water.
  • 6 or more Thai chillies.
  • 1/4 tsp shrimp paste and 1/4tsp salt.

Blitz all these ingredients together and you have fiery little sauce.

It is hard for me to pick a favourite dish made with Tamarind this recipe for Beef Rendang is a recipe given to me by my friend Mamik and it is very nice the beef is amazing. It is also my go-to recipe if I want that special dish to impress although there are many ingredients and it has quite a long prep time it is so worth it and as I said earlier if I am having guests a really lovely dish. You can see how rich and flavoursome that meat looks and it tastes amazing…

beef rendang

Ingredients:

  • 2” Galangal
  • 2” Ginger
  • 1 kg beef (Bottom Round)
  • 1-litre  Coconut Milk (3 sm tins and made to one litre with water)
  • Grind together and put on one side, 1 tbsp Coriander seeds, 1 tsp Cumin seeds and 1 tsp white peppercorns.
  • 2 Star Anise.
  • Half cup toasted coconut (pound in the pestle until oil is released and it looks like a paste.)
  • 1 Turmeric Leaf (Leave the leaf whole but tear side to stem along the leaf) this releases the flavour.
  • 2 stems lemongrass crushed along the stem.
  • 2 Lime leaves.
  • Soak 1-2 tsp Tamarind pulp in a little water and set aside for later.

Curry Paste:

Blitz the next 4 ingredients together to make the curry paste.

  • 2cm Fresh Turmeric.
  • 10 Shallots
  • 5 Cloves Garlic
  • 10 large red chillies (de-seed if you want a milder curry)

Let’s Cook!

Cut the beef into large cubes.

Put a tbsp oil of your choice in a cooking pot (I use a wok). Add Curry paste, ground coriander seeds, cumin and white peppercorns plus add chopped ginger, turmeric and galangal stir for 5 mins, add beef and stir to combine. Add coconut milk/water mixture and stir to combine.

Slowly bring to a gentle simmer, add torn turmeric leaf, lemongrass and lime leaves and star anise.

Cover the pan and cook until meat is tender at least 3 hrs on a low simmer, stirring occasionally.

Add the ground coconut paste about a half-hour before the end of the cooking time and also the tamarind liquid and this is when the magic happens and the taste goes from just another curry to something wonderful.

When the meat is cooked and tender remove the turmeric leaf and lemongrass stalks although if we are not eating the curry until the next day I leave them and remove them before we eat the curry.

This curry should traditionally have a very thick paste and is also best eaten the next day to allow the flavours to develop.

However, as Europeans prefer a thinner sauce you can choose not to reduce down as much.

Enjoy!

Another of my favourites is Miang Kham although I have made this at home some markets sell all the little bits ready cut in bags with the sauce much easier and they taste just the same as much of the food sold on the markets here is made in home kitchens and sold from a market stall…

miang-kham-1188212_1920

 

Ingredients: Filling:

  • 3/4 cup grated coconut (this is often available in the baking section of most supermarkets) if you are not as lucky as me and can buy from our local fresh markets.
  • 2 small limes, unpeeled (try to get limes with thin skin), cut into small cubes
  • 6 tablespoons shallots, peeled and cut into small cubes
  • 6 tablespoons roasted peanuts
  • 6 tablespoons small dried shrimps
  • 4-5 fresh Thai chillies, cut into small slivers
  • 4 oz fresh ginger, peeled and cut into small cubes.

Ingredients: Sauce:

  • 1 tablespoon shrimp paste, roasted until fragrant
  • 2 oz fresh galangal, cut into slivers and roasted until fragrant (see note below)
  • 1/4 cup grated coconut, roasted in a low-heat oven until lightly brown
  • 4 oz small dried shrimps.
  • 2 oz shallots, peeled and coarsely cut
  • 1.5 teaspoons fresh ginger, sliced
  • 8 oz palm sugar (broken into small chunks)
  • 2 tablespoons table sugar
  • 1 tbsp tamarind soaked in 3 tbsp water for about 10 mins.
  • salt for seasoning

Let’s Cook!

The Sauce.

In a pestle and mortar, pound together the shallots and galangal until fine (note about galangal: it’s ok to use dried galangal as long as it’s placed in a dish of lukewarm water for a few minutes to reconstitute). Add roasted shrimp paste, ginger, coconut and dried shrimp, and continue pounding until smooth. Remove the mixture and place in a pot with 1.5 cups water. Bring to a boil over medium heat, add palm sugar and table sugar, then reduce heat and simmer, wait until reduced to 1 cup or a bit less. Add tamarind liquid. Taste, and adjust by adding a bit of salt. Remove from heat and transfer to a small bowl.

Wrapping Leaves

Your choice of what leaves to use is up to you. Some use lettuce or spinach leaves due to ready availability, but to get an authentic flavour you should use the fresh Betel Leaves.

To serve:

Roast the coconut in a low-heat oven until lightly brown. Spoon the roasted coconut into a serving plate. In separate small bowls, arrange each filling ingredient listed above. With a fresh wrapping leaf in hand, fold it once across the bottom then sideways to form a pocket. Place about 1 teaspoon toasted coconut in the leaf together with a small amount of each filling to create a bite-sized quantity. Spoon the sauce on top, pop in your mouth and enjoy!

Although this can be a little time-consuming to prepare it is well worth it.

Lastly a beautiful salad with a Tamarind Sauce.

Yum Takrai (Spicy Lemongrass Salad)

Thai Lemongrass Salad with tamarind dip

 

Ingredients:

  • 15 stalks fresh lemongrass.
  • 14 cup finely chopped ginger
  • 2 tbsp. toasted cashews
  • 2 tbsp. whole dried shrimp
  • 12 tbsp. fish sauce
  • 12 tbsp. fresh lime juice
  • 1/2-1 12 tbsp. sugar
  • 1 tbsp. whole dried shrimp, finely ground
  • 4-6 red Thai chillies stemmed and thinly sliced
  • 2 shallots, very thinly sliced lengthwise
  • 3 raw stemmed long beans, cut into 4″ pieces for garnish.

Let’s Cook!

Trim and slice lemongrass very finely. Transfer lemongrass slices to a medium bowl, separate rings with your fingers. Add ginger, cashews, shrimp, fish sauce, lime juice, sugar, ground shrimp, Thai chiles, and shallots, and toss well. Garnish with long beans. Serve on Banana Leaf or Betel Leaf as in my picture.
We also serve with a tamarind sauce made by combining 3 tbsp tamarind pulp with cup water in a small pan, bring to boil and simmer 5 mins.
Remove from heat and stand 15 mins you can help break tamarind down with a spoon, strain through sieve extracting as much liquid as possible.
Add 2cm peeled finely chopped ginger and 2 cloves finely chopped garlic, 11/2 tbsp palm sugar,2 tsp fish sauce,1 tbsp chilli/garlic sauce and 1 tsp soy sauce to tamarind liquid. Bring to boil, simmer 5 mins.
Whisk 1 tbsp cornflour with little water whisk into sauce cook 1 min or until thickens.
Taste and adjust seasoning add more sugar if required.
Keeps in an airtight container in the fridge for up to one week.
Enjoy!
Now if you ever get the opportunity to try young tamarind fruit are you in for a treat it is both
beautiful to look at and tastes amazing…
fresh young tamarind fruit

The fruit inside starts off white and tastes nutty and as it ripens it goes pink and you can slightly taste a sourness, the last stage when it is dried and you get the dark sticky tamarind is maybe the tamarind you see for sale in bright red boxes in your supermarket.

Thank you for reading this I hope you enjoyed learning about this beautiful fruit……Thank you xxx

About Carol Taylor: 

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and wellbeing.

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…….Then, I will be happy!

Have a great weekend, stay safe and be well xx

 

 

 

Saturday Morning Market…Not this week…

Saturday Morning MarketNot this Saturday morning or until further notice although as it is a food market it is still open…I, however, do not want to take that chance so for the foreseeable I will regale you with fruits and vegetables that I have already discovered…it will help me while away the time …instead of just eating…sigh…

Saturday Morning Market 28st March

I have also taken this exile as a prompt to have a clear-out..some 500 plus posts are now in the Trash and at some point, I probably will resurrect some of them and the others will go to the permanently deleted bin…

In the meantime, I will share with you some of the lovely fruits and vegetables that I have already discovered here and love to eat or not…

This tiny little sweet and sour fruit is part of the Sapindaceae family which includes lychee, longan and rambutan.

It is a tiny little fruit which grows wild and is often called the wild lychee the tree it comes from is enormous and the fruit so tiny it also quite rare to find… I came across this fruit quite by chance when I took a ride back from the market in a tuk-tuk. I have not had the pleasure of finding any since maybe one day as they are a beautiful little fruit.

My tuk-tuk driver had a bag of these in the back of his tuk-tuk and me being nosey asked him what they were he told me to try some which I did ..of course…when I expressed my pleasure he gave me some…Thais are very generous… if you try what they offer and you like it you will always be gifted some. He told me that he had a tree in his village which was where he got the fruit from…his snack for the day…

korlan fruit on bunch

When peeled they look like very small lychees and I could find very little information about this lovely little fruit… It may be found locally on markets or often people just sit on the sidewalk with a few fruits and vegetables from their land which they are selling to make a few baht but this is also where you come across unusual fruits and vegetables which are not commercially grown or they are just grown wild.

Korlan fruit with one peeled

Found also in Laos and Myanmar it is not grown commercially or generally cultivated so quite rare.

Korlan... the rare wild fruit juice has a delicious and unique taste of sour and sweet variety with health benefits from vitamins and antioxidants.

It is said to regulate blood sugar and also to improve concentration and stress. Locals say eaten daily or taken as a syrup/extract made from the fruit it gives increased energy and boosts the immune system, therefore, combating flu viruses and colds. I could certainly do with some of them right now…

korlan fruit in chilli sauce

My daughter in law said they were also eaten with dried chilli, fish sauce and lime they were quite nice and as I didn’t have enough to make a syrup we enjoyed them just like this… this type of dip/sauce is quite commonly eaten with fruits.

The stones if I had thought I could have maybe sprouted them and had my own tree…next time methinks…

Have you come across this fruit?? Do you have any recipes using this fruit?? If so I would love to hear from you in the comments x

The Tamarind is very plentiful here and used in many Thai dishes …I love just eating the fruit it has quite a sour taste but I like it…It is sold in little packs here on the markets the seeds already removed or as a paste to add to food. It is also sold dried and sugared as a snack food and although sugared is still has quite a sour…taste…

These rather plain brown pods of fruit do, however, have the capacity to elevate your food to something else.

Tamarind like many fruits and vegetables has a long history of healing and aiding stomach disorders and is used as a laxative.

Tamarind preparations are used for fevers, sore throats, inflammation of joints and sunstroke. The leaves dried or boiled are made into poultices to help reduce swollen joints, sprains, boils, haemorrhoids and conjunctivitis.

Tamarind is also great as a marinade for meat as it breaks down and tenderises tougher cuts of meat. It is used to make jams and syrups it is also one of the secret ingredients of Lea & Perrins  Worcestershire sauce which is a fermented sauce which has many uses.

Great for smoothies a mango and tamarind smoothie is very nice it also has many other culinary uses.

This little dip is a recipe from Bali given to me by my grandson’s girlfriend it is very easy to make but made more special by the addition of tamarind. 

Called Rujak sauce it is lovely with mangoes.

  • Take 200 gm of palm sugar shaved.
  • 15 gm of tamarind flesh and 5 tbsp of water leave to infuse for 5 mins and then drain and keep the tamarind flavoured water.
  • 6 or more Thai chillies.
  • 1/4 tsp shrimp paste and 1/4tsp salt.

Blitz all these ingredients together and you have fiery little sauce.

It is hard for me to pick a favourite dish made with Tamarind  Beef Rendang is a recipe given to me by my friend Mamik and it is very nice the beef is amazing. It is also my go-to recipe if I want that special dish to impress although there are many ingredients and it has quite a long prep time it is so worth it and as I said earlier if I am having guests a really lovely dish.  rich and flavoursome it tastes amazing…This recipe will be in my cookbook…

Another of my favourites is Miang Kham although I have made it at home some markets sell all the little bits ready cut in bags with the sauce much easier and they taste just the same as much of the food sold on the markets here is made in home kitchens and sold on the market…

miang-kham-1188212_1920

 

Ingredients: Filling:

  • 3/4 cup grated coconut (this is often available in the baking section of most supermarkets) if you are not as lucky as me and can buy from our local fresh markets.
  • 2 small limes, unpeeled (try to get limes with thin skin), cut into small cubes
  • 6 tablespoons shallots, peeled and cut into small cubes
  • 6 tablespoons roasted peanuts
  • 6 tablespoons small dried shrimps
  • 4-5 fresh Thai chillies, cut into small slivers
  • 4 oz fresh ginger, peeled and cut into small cubes.

Ingredients: Sauce:

  • 1 tablespoon shrimp paste, roasted until fragrant
  • 2 oz fresh galangal, cut into slivers and roasted until fragrant (see note below)
  • 1/4 cup grated coconut, roasted in a low-heat oven until lightly brown
  • 4 oz small dried shrimps.
  • 2 oz shallots, peeled and coarsely cut
  • 1.5 teaspoons fresh ginger, sliced
  • 8 oz palm sugar (broken into small chunks)
  • 2 tablespoons table sugar
  • 1 tbsp tamarind soaked in 3 tbsp water for about 10 mins.
  • salt for seasoning

Let’s Cook!

The Sauce.

In a pestle and mortar, pound together the shallots and galangal until fine (note about galangal: it’s ok to use dried galangal as long as it’s placed in a dish of lukewarm water for a few minutes to reconstitute). Add roasted shrimp paste, ginger, coconut and dried shrimp, and continue pounding until smooth. Remove the mixture and place in a pot with 1.5 cups water. Bring to a boil over medium heat, add palm sugar and table sugar, then reduce heat and simmer, wait until reduced to 1 cup or a bit less. Add tamarind liquid. Taste, and adjust by adding a bit of salt. Remove from heat and transfer to a small bowl.

Wrapping Leaves

Your choice of what leaves to use is up to you. Some use lettuce or spinach leaves due to ready availability, but to get an authentic flavour you should use the fresh Betel Leaves.

To serve:

Roast the coconut in a low-heat oven until lightly brown. Spoon the roasted coconut into a serving plate. In separate small bowls, arrange each filling ingredient listed above. With a fresh wrapping leaf in hand, fold it once across the bottom then sideways to form a pocket. Place about 1 teaspoon toasted coconut in the leaf together with a small amount of each filling to create a bite-sized quantity. Spoon the sauce on top, pop in your mouth and enjoy!

Although this can be a little time-consuming to prepare it is well worth it.

Thank you for reading this post I hope you have enjoyed it and the recipes xxx

About Carol Taylor:

 Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and wellbeing.

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…….Then, I will be happy!

Thank you again for reading enjoy your weekend and stay safe and healthy xxx

 

 

 

 

 

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – The Food Column with Carol Taylor – Favourite dishes of 2018

First post of 2019 on my Cookery Column over at Smorgasbord Magazine and some of my favourite dishes from 2018…I hope you enjoy 😉 xxx

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

Some of my favourite dishes – Carol Taylor

Wow…Another New Year has begun where does the time go? It does seem to be that the older I get the quicker the time flies…

For my first post of the year I thought I would share my favourite foods …

I love food…Good food, but my tastes have changed over the years, is that with age or location and availability of foods? Maybe, but here are a few favorites of mine…. recipes I make often, or if the family asks for…

This is a recipe that my daughter gave me along with a packet of Chia seeds as I couldn’t
always get them here. That has now changed due their growing popularity and they are sold everywhere here now.

Banana Smoothie

Bananas we have in spades as they grow in abundance here so my freezer always has frozen bananas ready to…

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