Tag Archives: Star Fruit Relish

CarolCooks2…Friday Food Reviews…Aromatic Leaves…Part 5…

Welcome to Friday Food Reviews, where I will cover a different food or product each week and look at… what they are.  where do they grow, what can we substitute them for in a recipe, and are they safe to eat, store, use, cook, or anything connected to that food? or product..all the why’s and the wherefores…it will, of course, be mainly my own opinion or a known fact…good or bad…there may even be a tried and tested recipe…or three… today I am looking at…Aromatic LeavesPart 5.

Why am I looking at aromatic leaves?… as a foodie I am always searching for new recipes…many recipes especially Asian ones make use of aromatic leaves which are different from the regular much-used soft-leafed herbs like coriander and mint etc…

Many leaves that are native to other countries are now finding their way around the world either dried or frozen… I think that is great as we can widen our cooking repertoire and experience other flavours…some of which we may not like and others which may become a staple in our spice collection…

Foraging is an age-old tradition that is very prevalent here and moreso around the world in recent years as people realise just how beneficial to our health and well-being foraged greens can be…and why waste a natural resource as food shortages hit us harder we may need to rely on foraging more often…

Foraging is also a wonderful way to explore nature, conserve ecosystems, and enrich your diet, but it is vital to know which plants are edible and which plants will send you to the emergency room and always remember to wash them thoroughly… If you are a beginner at foraging like me, it’s best to start foraging under the guidance of an experienced outdoorsman/woman with extensive knowledge of local plant life…I have my DIL and a Thai friend who are both very knowledgeable and if in doubt, let the plant be and raid your garden instead until you have the knowledge to be safe…

Deep Fried Maple Leaves…

Who knew certainly not me!... Wow, you live and learn as they say…

Star Fruit Leaves…one of my neighbours has a huge star fruit tree and the fruit makes a delicious relish…however, I didn’t know you could cook with the leaves until very recently but before I tell you about the leaves I will just share this little relish recipe made with the beautiful star fruit or carambola as some of you may know it as…

Star Fruit Relish:

  • 8 cups of star fruit, thinly sliced and any seeds removed.
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 1/2 cups cider vinegar
  • 1 tbsp whole cloves tied in a muslin bag and slightly crushed.
  • 4 cups of sugar
  • 1/2 tsp ground nutmeg( optional) see note below.

Let’s, Pickle!

Wash and thinly slice the star fruit removing any seeds. Cover with the cider vinegar and stand overnight…in the morning drain the vinegar then add sugar, salt and the clove bag. Cook gently until the relish starts to thicken then allow to stand overnight.

In the morning remove the spice bag and reheat the mix after adding the nutmeg if used and bring it to a boil.

If you plan to store the star fruit chutney then omit the nutmeg as it will turn the relish a brown colour although it does add another dimension to the taste.

Put into hot jars and process in a hot water bath for 10 minutes.

Enjoy with some cold meats or bread and butter.

My second learning curve of the day...this post is certainly that…The Star Fruit Leaves ...my grandson’s partner comes from Bali and has been the source of a few of my recipes talking to her about the aromatic leaves they use she told me about this dish and the fact that this tree grows in many Balinese gardens…

Of course, I had to go and pick some leaves from my neighbour’s tree and they are everything she said crunchy with a slightly bitter tang…she also shared a recipe that once I make  I will share with you…it’s called “ Jukut Blimbing” which translates to Star Fruit Leaves in Sweet Sauce…and of course, as tradition dictates its served on a banana leaf…

Indonesian Bay Leaf…until a few weeks ago I only thought that the laurel bay was the only bay leaf and the only one I have used until very recently…how wrong I was…Duan Salam translates as bay leaf…it is however not remotely the same in taste as the laurel bay… a subtly, flavoured leaf of the Cassia family…however the flavour bears no resemblance to the laurel bay leaf which is sometimes suggested as a substitute. If you cannot obtain dried salam leaves then omit them from the recipe or substitute them with the curry leaf…

To release their flavour before adding to a recipe fry 3-4 leaves either in oil or heat them in some coconut milk either of these will release the flavour…you can then add the leaves to your recipe…

N.B...my search was successful…yeah! I have found some duan salam and they are winging their way to me…

Thank you for joining me today as always I look forward to your comments and if you forage for leaves and mushrooms and have some tales of your experiences and finds to tell then I will be happy to share them…xx

The Culinary Alphabet …..A-Z…Series 3… the letter M…

Welcome to series 3 of the Culinary Alphabet A-Z…Where the middle letter is M…

Nothing is as it seems here…this new series is the brainchild of Chel Owens who writes at A wife, My Verse, and Every Little Thingmy followers are so good to me they think up all sorts of permutations of the Alphabet for me to blog about…not sure if they want me to call it quits or what they will come up with next…Chel like Pete was, however, will be called on to make her contribution every two weeks…they don’t get off scot-free…however, as Chel is on a baby break she is exempt for now…be well Chel xx

So what’s in store? In this series the A, B, C, etc will be the middle letter, for example, Cajun, Lemon, Ackee and Yucca… how easy that will be who knows I am sure some of the letters of the alphabet could cause the grey matter to rebel or implode…haha…I also don’t want to use plurals to form a word as I may need that word for another letter and it’s sort of cheating I think…unless of course I really get stuck…which I am sure will happen…

Today it is words where the middle letter is M... not so easy or as many as last time but I found a few… I love scrambled eggs for breakfast maybe with a crumpet…

Let’s go and see what I have found…

Camembert…

There is nothing like a baked Camembert cheese, a glass of wine, fresh-cooked crusty bread maybe some walnuts…delicious on a sunny day or a cold winters evening…this French Cheese is made from cow’s milk and produced in Normandy in Northwest of France.

Carambola…

More commonly known as Star fruit or 5 fingers fruit…it is a beautiful sunny yellow colour with the most delicious smell…it can be eaten raw as it is, it is often used as a decoration on desserts as it is so very pretty…The entire fruit is edible it has firm, crunchy flesh and is quite juicy. The taste is likened to that of a grape.

It can be made into relishes, preserves and juice drinks…one of my favourites is this beautiful relish.

Star Fruit Relish:

Ingredients

• 8 cups of star fruit, thinly sliced and any seeds removed.
• 1/2 tsp salt
• 1 1/2 cups cider vinegar
• 1 tbsp whole cloves tied in a muslin bag and slightly crushed.
• 4 cups of sugar
• 1/2 tsp ground nutmeg( optional)

Let’s Cook!

Wash and thinly slice the star fruit removing any seeds. Cover with the cider vinegar and stand overnight.

Drain the vinegar add sugar, salt and clove bag. Cook gently until the relish starts to thicken then allow to stand overnight.

In the morning remove the spice bag and reheat the mix after adding the nutmeg if used and bring back to the boil.

If you plan to store the star fruit chutney then omit the nutmeg as it will turn the relish a brown colour although it does add another dimension to the taste.

Put into hot jars and process in a hot water bath for 10 minutes.

Enjoy with some cold meats or on bread and butter.

Catmint…

Also commonly known as Catnip and catswort it is well known for its popularity and effects on cats…it is also a great insect repellant.

For us…Tea is one of the more common ways catmint is taken. The plant’s flowering tops are steeped in water (unlike traditional tea, you do NOT want to put catnip in boiling water, bring the water to a boil and remove from heat for a minute before beginning the steeping process) and consumed like any other herbal tea.

Chambre…

Chambre or Chapea is a bean, rice and meat stew…a hearty traditional Dominican lunch it is made like all stews in one pot….just like my mum’s recipe every household has their own family tradition recipe for a delicious, hearty Chambre.

Crumble…

Who doesn’t love a nice bowl of fruit crumble it can be made with almost any fruit or a mixture of fruits with a lovely crumble topping served with a bowl of custard or ice cream it is a lovely thing…comfort food at its best…What is your favourite crumble? ..a hard choice… I love gooseberry, rhubarb or a nice tart apple crumble…

Apple and Mulberry Crumble Recipe

Crumpet…

Toasted over an open fire is one of my abiding childhood memories…served with lashings of butter which inevitably drips down your chin..it is a wonderful thing on a winters day…

I also had one of my biggest and messiest cooking disasters the first time I attempted to make them from scratch…Note to self use a bigger jug next time…lol

Crumpet Recipe.

Ferment…

To ferment…my yeast above certainly did…lol…I love fermented foods like kimchi, sauerkraut, kombucha, sourdough bread, miso, kefir to name but a few …of course not forgetting the obvious also our wine does ladies…

The earliest record of fermentation dates back as far as 6000 B.C. in the rich soils of the Fertile Crescent—and nearly every civilization since has included at least one fermented food in its culinary heritage. Global cultures have crafted unique flavours and traditions around fermentation from Korean kimchi and Indian chutneys to sauerkraut, yoghurt and cheese.

Of course, now it has it is labelled probiotics the marketing guru’s in word and the like but it is all down to fermentation.

Gumbo…

New Orleans and Gumbo…sold in a backstreet cafe or on the poshest of menus you will find Creole gumbo, filé gumbo, cowan gumbo, chicken gumbo, smoked sausage gumbo, hot sausage gumbo, onion gumbo…and many more as with all traditional recipes there are the inevitable variations and everyone’s mother or grandmother makes the best…the origins and evolution of the dish are highly speculative. The name derives from a West African word for okra, suggesting that gumbo was originally made with okra. The use of filé (dried and ground sassafras leaves) was a contribution of the Choctaws and, possibly, other local tribes. Roux has its origin in French cuisine, although the roux used in gumbos is much darker than its Gallic cousins…putting all that aside it is a beautiful thing hearty and warming…

Lemon…

The fruit of the Lemon tree…this beautiful yellow citrus fruit is used for culinary and non-culinary purposes throughout the world, primarily for its juice, which has both culinary and cleaning uses.

Oval shaped and bright yellow in colour the fruits are acidic and sour…Lemons are high in vitamin C, fibre, and various beneficial plant compounds…These nutrients are responsible for several health benefits.

Limes…

Limes are small, round and green and are used extensively in Asian cuisine…the lime has a slightly more bitter taste than the lemon. Limes can also be used as a one to one replacement to lemons…In my recipes when I state limes ..the lemon can be used the difference in the taste is negligible although I have now got used to using limes which I prefer…

Marshmallow…

Where chocolate is the guilty pleasure of many..marshmallows are mine…not the Haribo ones they are just sweet nothing but the classic English marshmallows…toasted or on hot chocolate or just straight from the bag they hit the spot…

A confectionary is typically made from sugar, water and gelatin…

Marmite…

I’m in the…  Love It! camp although it is either a love or hate spread on hot buttered toast it is fabulous…My Aussie cousins have Vegemite…I am a Marmite girl.

What is Marmite and how is it made? Marmite is a dark, thick, yeast extract spread. It’s made from concentrated yeast extract, which is a by-product of brewing beer. It was conceived in 1902 when the Marmite Food Company opened a small factory in Burton-on-Trent – where it still resides today.

Over the last few years, Marmite has produced different flavours as a limited edition around Christmas. There is a Christmas Edition. There has been a Guinness flavoured Marmite, Chill flavoured, XO flavoured…I have also heard tell that a PB and Marmite one is on the shelves me I have stuck to the original so far…

Muskmelon…

Muskmelon also called nutmeg melon is a member of the gourd family…with its musky, orange juicy flesh it is one of my favourites. Rich in Vitamin C and Potassium it is a delightfully refreshing fruit.

Oatmeal…

To me it’s Porridge …I love a hot warming bowl of porridge Oats with brown sugar or a lovely fruit compote…maybe some walnuts, raisins and a drizzle of honey…

Scottish traditionalists allow only oats, water and salt although full-fat milk makes a rich porridge. A ratio of one part of milk to two of water has been recommended as a happy medium. A little salt added towards the end of cooking is essential, whether or not the porridge is sweetened.

Pomes…

Which fruits are pomes? …apples, pears, loquats, medlars, crab apples and quinces are all types of pome. A botany term a pome is an accessory fruit composed of one or more carpels surrounded by accessory tissue.

Ramen Noodles…

Ramen are thin, wheat-based noodles made from wheat flour, salt, water, and kansui, a form of alkaline water. The dough is risen before being rolled. They were imported from China during the Meiji period. There is also a lot of controversy surrounding Ramen noodles but like anything, there are the commercially produced instant noodles with high sodium levels, MSG and TBHQ, little or no fibre content to talk about and then there are healthy alternatives to Ramen Noodles like vegetable noodles or spirals. … For real noodle alternatives, try udon or soba noodles. These are low in sodium and fat and make for a great alternative in ramen bowls.

Saltimbocca…

The original version of this dish is saltimbocca alla Romana (“saltimbocca Roman-style”), which consists of veal, prosciutto and sage, rolled up and cooked in dry white wine and butter.

Scrambled Eggs…

One of my favourite ways to eat eggs…softly scrambled with some freshly toasted bread or with smoked salmon as a treat.

Soymilk…

Very popular here Soy milk is a plant-based non-dairy beverage, often consumed as an alternative to milk. Most soy milk sold on the market are fortified but read the label to make sure yours contains calcium and vitamin D. (Soy milk doesn’t naturally contain calcium.)

Sumac…

Made from the dried and ground berries of the wild sumac flower, sumac is a tangy spice with a sour, acidic flavour reminiscent of lemon juice. This fragrant spice is used to brighten up dry rubs, spice blends like za’atar, and dressings.

Sumac is a widely used, essential spice in Middle Eastern and Mediterranean cooking It pairs well with vegetables, grilled lamb, chicken and fish.

That’s all for the letter M…Thank you for joining me today I hope you have found something new and some of your favourites…xx

Until tomorrow, where I will be back in my kitchen cooking from scratch, have a lovely day xx

 

It’s National Pickles Week! Piperies Mikres Toursi…Star Fruit Relish and more…

Who doesn’t love a pickle…? Pickles are eaten across all cultures around the world..we love pickles and I pickle anything and everything from garlic, jalapenos, cabbage of all sorts, cucumbers, onions, eggs, peppers, pineapple, tomatoes, star fruit, fish and more…

Pickles are mentioned at least twice in the Bible (Numbers 11:5 and Isaiah 1:8), were known to the ancient Egyptians (Cleopatra attributed some of her beauty to pickles), and Aristotle praised the healing effects of pickled cucumbers. The Romans imported all sorts of foods from the countries they conquered, pickling them for the journey in vinegar, oil, brine and sometimes honey. Garum or Liquamen, a fermented, salted fish-based condiment which was a dietary staple and has been found as far north as the Antonine Wall built by the Romans across what is now the Central Belt of Scotland, between the Firth of Forth and the Firth of Clyde.

That’s some history for a pickled cucumber which is said to be one of the first recorded pickles… sometime around 2030 BC in Mesopotamia…

I have also been called a little pickle in my time and have applied that description to my own kiddies it is a term of endearment to me it means they are bright, witty and a tiny little bit cheeky. A child who can stand up for themselves with a good sense of humour.

The name pickle as in the English word ‘pickle’ derives from the Middle English pikel, first recorded around 1400 and meaning a spicy sauce or gravy served with meat or fowl. This is different to but obviously related to the Middle Dutch source, pekel, meaning a solution, such as spiced brine, for preserving and flavouring food.

Star Fruit Relish:

Star Fruit or Carambola as it is also known as is a lovely vibrant yellow and due to its distinctive ridges when it’s cut it resembles a star hence its name.

The entire fruit is edible it has firm, crunchy flesh and is quite juicy. The taste is likened to that of a grape. There are two main types of star fruit the smaller fruit is sour(tart) and the larger fruit like I have in my garden is sweeter. But although sweet they very rarely have more than a 4% sugar content.

Here in Thailand they are cooked with shrimp or chicken or eaten raw dipped into the sugar/chilli mix which is commonly eaten with fruit here or just eaten with rock salt. It can be made into relishes, preserves and juice drinks, stewed with cloves or apples.

They are also used as a pretty garnish or in a salad with papaya and pineapple.

Star Fruit Relish:

  • 8 cups of star fruit, thinly sliced and any seeds removed.
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 1/2 cups cider vinegar
  • 1 tbsp whole cloves tied in a muslin bag and slightly crushed.
  • 4 cups of sugar
  • 1/2 tsp ground nutmeg( optional) see note below.

Let’s Pickle!

Wash and thinly slice the star fruit removing any seeds. Cover with the cider vinegar and stand overnight.

Drain the vinegar add sugar, salt and clove bag. Cook gently until the relish starts to thicken then allow to stand overnight.

In the morning remove the spice bag and reheat the mix after adding the nutmeg if used and bring back to the boil.

If you plan to store the star fruit chutney then omit the nutmeg as it will turn the relish a brown colour although it does add another dimension to the taste.

Put into hot jars and process in a hot water bath for 10 minutes.

Enjoy with some cold meats or on bread and butter.

Did you know? 

Here in Asia, more pickles are consumed per capita than any other region? I think as well as being delicious that it is a method given the hot temperatures of preserving food.

Foods are generally pickled in one of three ways salt/brine, oil or vinegar…Here Thais tend you use salt/brine rather than vinegar which many find too sour…Wherever you eat out you will find pickled vegetables either served with the meal or as a side dish.

Some popular pickles/vinegar here is Banana vinegar, naem hed (pickled mushroom), dok sa-no dong (pickled sesbania flowers and lotus stem) and kimchi.

Banana vinegar is made from a type of local banana and many Thais replace the commercially-produced vinegar that often comes with preservatives with banana vinegar. Pickled sesbania is a good side to any main dish or nam phrik. Sesbania is a small edible pea-shaped flower which is very popular here.

Food preservation was a good way to deal with the abundant supply of vegetable, especially those grown in the rainy season, before the invention of the refrigerator. Seasonal vegetables that were often pickled included spring onions, ginger and mustard greens, which can be found anywhere in Thailand; phak sian (cleome) is found in the North and Northeast, while luk Niang (Djenkol bean fruit), and sa-tor (stink beans) are mostly found in the South.

In some rural places, the big clay pots are still used to preserve food…

Any container can be used to pickle as long as it is non-reactive…Mason Jars are a popular Jar for pickles the first one was designed and patented by John Mason back in 1858 he designed it to specifically withstand high temperatures when it was necessary to sterilise the jars.

Pickles range from mild to spicy or fruity and never waste the pickle juice as it can be used in a Martini aptly named a Pickletini, I ad some to a bloody Mary and it is now a popular chaser a shot called a Pickleback…

Just going to check my Pork as my Braised Pork in Black vinegar should be braising nicely…Will let you know with images tomorrow…It is the first time I have used Black Vinegar…

International pickle week fits in nicely with National Vinegar month don’t you think?

Are pickles healthy? 

Well, some store-purchased pickles contain sugar so beware or make your own and then you can omit the sugar…However, a medium-size pickle might pack 12 cals and who can only eat one? Just be aware…moderation. But pickles do contain sodium. Preserving any kind of food requires the addition of salt, and salt makes up about 5 per cent of most pickling recipes. Two small spears contain almost 600 mg of sodium, more than one-quarter of the recommended daily limit.

Fermentation is one method of pickling, but not all pickles are fermented.

When vegetables and fruits are fermented, healthy bacteria break down the natural sugars. This process is what gives fermented pickles their sour taste. The pickles sit in saltwater and ferment over many days.

When pickles aren’t fermented, vinegar gives them their tang. Vinegar itself is produced through a fermentation process, but only the kinds of vinegar that remain raw and unpasteurized, such as raw apple cider vinegar, retain parts of the “mother culture,” which provides that good bacteria.

Eating fermented foods may help with everything from insulin resistance to inflammation. Sauerkraut, one of the most popular fermented foods worldwide, has been shown to have anti-cancer benefits.

Pickles that are not fermented still deliver the benefits of vinegar, spices, and cucumbers. As I mentioned above drinking pickle juice has become a trend because media sources are promoting the benefits related to muscle cramps, weight loss, diabetes, and more.

Pickle juice is also a favourite of those following a ketogenic diet, who might need more sodium to manage electrolyte balance. 

Cooking any food can break down heat-sensitive nutrients, including antioxidants. Pickling raw vegetables and fruits preserve their antioxidant powers.

Like anything else, I tend to discount wacky claims of instant inch loss/weight …I tend to eat what I eat because I enjoy eating it and also because I may know it contains certain vitamins and minerals for my well being…however moderation is the key and I don’t go overboard and only eat the one food item for every meal we need balance in our diets.. a good combination of food… if we are eating well and sensibly it should be enough…

We love pickles so what have I been pickling lately? Well not have I been fancying a lovely piece of Cod and Chips but I have been fancying a Doner Kebab…Where we used to get them years ago when in the Uk was a little Greek place which did the best kebabs and served with these wonderful pickled green peppers…That is what I am pickling…They are called  Piperies Mikres Toursi…

  • 36 thin peppers, such as Anaheim peppers, about 3 inches long, stems trimmed to 1/4 inch long
  • 3 tablespoons coarse-grained salt
  • Water, enough to cover the peppers
  • 5 cups red wine, apple cider vinegar, white vinegar or spiced vinegar (any flavour)

Add the peppers to a large glass bowl. Sprinkle with the salt and then fill the bowl with cold water until it just covers the peppers. Soak for 6 hours, stirring occasionally.

Drain the water after 6 hours. Lay the peppers on clean towels until the peppers dry. When the peppers are dry, stuff them into clean and sterilized 1-quart mason jars. Pour vinegar into each jar, making sure to cover the peppers. Seal the jars according to the package instructions for the Mason jars.

smart

Store the peppers in a clean, dry place for up to 3 months.

The only jar I could find was quite a big one and my peppers floated…What I did was fill 2 bags with salted water(just)in case they split and dropped them in the jar…the vinegar rose and my peppers are submerged so if you have jar wich just too big then this little tip is a godsend…

Once they are pickled then I will make my kebab mix which I haven’t made since I was in the Uk so for at least 8 years and those pickled peppers hopefully will be just what that kebab needs…

That’s all for International Pickle week… I hope you have enjoyed reading this post…Tomorrow I will update you on my dish using black vinegar and maybe some sauerkraut…Please stay safe and well..it ain’t over yet…xx

About Carol Taylor: 

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and wellbeing.

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…….Then, I will be happy!

Thank you once again for reading this post I hope you all have a fabulous week and stay safe these are troubling times xx

Mistletoe and Wine…Time to pickle…Eggs and Star Fruit…

Goodmorning and although sunny it is a cool 14 degrees here this morning…Time to get out a shawl for my shoulders…Tuesday is the day where all you Pickle addicts can pickle and pucker…Don’t you love that initial intake of breath when the vinegar hits your taste buds…?? Makes you give a little involuntary shiver…

Love pickled eggs??

But want a change ?? Love the colour pink? Then add some beet juice…Fancy a bit of spice  ?? Then check out these recipes…

Jalapeno pickled eggs:

Ingredients:

  • 3/4 a cup of Cider Vinegar.
  • 3/4 a cup of water.
  • 1/2 cup of sugar plus 1 tbsp sugar.
  • 6 cloves.
  • 2 Jalapenos cut in half lengthwise and deseeded.
  • 1 tsp cumin seeds.
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1/2 tsp oregano
  • 1/4 onion sliced.
  • 1 clove garlic, peeled
  • 9 Hard-boiled eggs, peeled.

Let’s get pickling!

Boil eggs for 10-15 mins until hard. Remove from heat and put into cold water.

In a medium pan, put vinegar, water( or beet juice) if using, onion, jalapenos, sugar, and spices. Bring to the boil and cook until sugar is dissolved. Remove from heat and allow to cool for a few minutes.

Pour vinegar over eggs making sure they are completely covered.

If using beet juice also put some beet in the jar with the eggs. You will then have pickled beets as well.

Make sure the lid is tight and refrigerate. The eggs will be ready to eat in a few days and will keep for up to a month if you haven’t already eaten them.

Curried Flavoured Pickled Eggs:

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup cider vinegar.
  • 3/4 a cup of water.
  • 1/4 of an onion.
  • 3/4 cup white sugar.
  • 3 cardamon pods
  • 1 tsp mustard seeds( yellow or brown)
  • I tbsp yellow curry paste.

Let’s Pickle!

As above bring all the ingredients to the boil until sugar is dissolved. Allow to cool a little and then pour the vinegar mix over the eggs making sure they are completely covered.

Allow to pickle for a few days in the fridge they are then ready to eat… Left with lots of pickle juice ????

Don’t want to waste that pickle juice???    Then have a …

Pickleback

What is a pickleback? You are about to find out! Let’s pickle and pucker…

It’s a shot of whiskey followed by a shot of pickle juice and some even follow that with a beer chaser…

A popular drink in bars around the world and apparently very good….Have you tried a pickleback????

I pickle everything well almost…

Here in Northern Thailand, the Star fruit is now in season and the trees are laden with the lovely fruit much still green at the moment but some are yellow and they are such a pretty fruit. I can smell them as I walk past the tree they have such a fragrant smell…

Star Fruit or Carambola as it is also known as is a lovely vibrant yellow and due to its distinctive ridges when it’s cut it resembles a star hence its name.

The entire fruit is edible it has a firm, crunchy flesh and is quite juicy. The taste is likened to that of a grape. There are two main types of star fruit the smaller fruit is sour(tart) and the larger fruit like I have in my garden is sweeter. But although sweet they very rarely have more than a 4% sugar content.

Here in Thailand they are cooked with shrimp or chicken or eaten raw dipped into the sugar/chilli mix which is commonly eaten with fruit here or just eaten with rock salt. It can be made into relishes, preserves and juice drinks, stewed with cloves or apples.

They are also used as a pretty garnish or in a salad with papaya and pineapple.

Star Fruit Relish:

  • 8 cups of star fruit, thinly sliced and any seeds removed.
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 1/2 cups cider vinegar
  • 1 tbsp whole cloves tied in a muslin bag and slightly crushed.
  • 4 cups of sugar
  • 1/2 tsp ground nutmeg( optional) see note below.

Let’s Pickle!

Wash and thinly slice the star fruit removing any seeds. Cover with the cider vinegar and stand overnight.

Drain the vinegar add sugar, salt and clove bag. Cook gently until the relish starts to thicken then allow to stand overnight.

In the morning remove the spice bag and reheat the mix after adding the nutmeg if used and bring back to the boil.

If you plan to store the star fruit chutney then omit the nutmeg as it will turn the relish a brown colour although it does add another dimension to the taste.

Put into hot jars and process in a hot water bath for 10 minutes.

Enjoy with some cold meats or on bread and butter.

N.B. Pickles make a lovely Christmas Present…With a pretty ribbon and a handwritten label, even the Queen of England was happy to receive a jar of homemade pickle.

I hope you have enjoyed these pick…le recipes if you try then please let me know …I like some of these as they don’t have to be left too long and can be eaten almost immediately unlike some pickles which need time to mature..xx

Don’t forget please let me have your Christmas images, jumpers, food, Christmas parties anything Christmas…Let’s get into the Christmas zone…x

That’s all for today …I hope you have enjoyed this post see you next Tuesday…x

P.P.S…There will be a Christmas jumper corner…I just need to see yours???? So come on don’t be shy…Please Share…x

In the meantime …These cute pooches will fill the space…Their mum is the lovely, Tori whose lovely children’s books would make awesome stocking fillers…

Lilie and Logan in red Christmasy bandannas

About Carol Taylor:

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and wellbeing.

The environment is also something I am passionate about and there are now regular columns on my blog this year. It is important that we are mindful of the world we live in…We all need to be aware of our home’s carbon footprints…where does our food come from? How far does it travel…Simple to do but if we all did it…Not only would we support local businesses but reduce our carbon footprint…

green foot prints eco system

 

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…….Then, I will be happy!

Thank you once again for reading this post I hope you all have a creative week ahead xx