Tag Archives: Tamarind

The Culinary Alphabet…13 terms for the letter T…

Welcome to this month’s edition of 13 terms of food in
The Culinary Alphabet T…where I guest post over at Esme’s Salon

THE CULINARY ALPHABET T

Tea and Toast

How many times in your life have you been offered tea and toast? Maybe never but it was something which when I was growing up was a telling example of your class and status.

Drinking tea and eating toast revealed more about you than you could ever imagine…For example, the taking of sugar in your tea was seen as a definite habit of the lower classes…even just a tincy winsy tiny bit more than one spoonful and you were definitely in the lower middle class ( at best)…More than two….working class and not only that cemented your status if you added your milk first and stirred noisily…Working-class…

To the English tea also had practically magical properties and that was across all the class lines.  Headache or a skinned knee, out came the teapot. Bruised ego, bereavement or divorce, and out came the teapot.  It was the balm to soothe most ills.

Photo credit: trawets1 on VisualHunt / CC BY-NC-SA

Add toast to the equation and we really came into our own, haha

It must be cool and dry, no soggy toast and it was also a matter of class how you ate that toast. I mean if you slathered it with butter and marmalade and god forbid if it wasn’t Dundee marmalade, and then proceed to take a bite. So vulgar it was the height of bad manners.  The correct way: Take a small piece and add just a smidgen of marmalade before taking a gentile bite. That guys and gals are how Toast and Tea are taken in England, according to your class of course.

Tabasco Sauce – TABASCO®

Original Red Pepper Sauce is made with three simple ingredients and aged in oak barrels for up to three years on Avery Island, Louisiana, before bottling. The recipe originating from Edmund McIlhenny in 1868 has been used by the McIlhenny family for nearly 150 years, just aged vinegar, salt, and peppers make this versatile hot pepper sauce.

The Culinary Alphabet T

Image by iSAW Company from Pixabay

 

Are you familiar with the following The Culinary Alphabet Terms?

Tabbouleh

Traditionally served as part of a Meze in the Arab world it has fast grown in popularity in the Western world.  I do love how increased travel and the internet have broadened our Culinary World. Tabouli salad or Tabbouleh is a simple Mediterranean salad of very finely chopped vegetables, lots of fresh parsley and bulgur wheat, all tossed with lime juice and olive oil.

Tahini

Tahini is a thick paste-like sauce made from sesame seeds, with a little bit of oil mixed in to make it the right consistency, and usually not much else. Tahini is similar to peanut butter in texture: creamy, oily, and smooth, and like peanut butter is rich in calcium. Tahini is a common ingredient in many vegetarian and vegan recipes (particularly in salad dressings and homemade hummus) and it is often used in Middle Eastern cooking.

How to make your very own Tahini paste/butter, it is so quick and easy and the cost of a packet of sesame seeds is virtually pennies against the cost of a store-bought jar of tahini and no nasties.

Let’s Cook Tahini – The Culinary Alphabet T! 

Into the kitchen, just quickly toast the Sesame Seeds, then into the mini blender, 3 tbsp Olive oil, and a quick whizz, scrape down the sides, another tbsp Olive oil and another scrape, a  bit more oil and a quick whizz and viola your Tahini Paste are made.

How easy is that?

Tamarind

One of my favourite cooking ingredients I love tamarind either just eaten as a fruit or used in cooking. Available everywhere here it is very popular and healthy.  To learn more about the Tamarind tree and some recipes where Tamarind is used.
Click Here

My favourite is the young tamarind pictured here only available for a very short period but a lovely way to eat the tamarind…

young tamarind fresh from the tree

Tempura

I prefer the lightness of tempura batter and it is used often in Asian recipes.  Specially formulated tempura flour is available in worldwide supermarkets. This is generally light (low-gluten) flour, and occasionally contains leaveners such as baking powder.  Tempura is very prevalent in Japanese cookery today most of the major changes to the tempura were In the early 17th century, around the Tokyo Bay area, tempura ingredients and preparation underwent a remarkable change as the Yatai (food cart) culture gained popularity.

Making the best use of fresh seafood while preserving its delicate taste, tempura used only flour, eggs, and water as ingredients and the batter was not flavoured. As the batter was mixed minimally in cold water, it avoided the dough-like stickiness caused by the activation of wheat gluten, resulting in the crispy texture which is now characteristic of tempura. It became customary to dip tempura quickly in a sauce mixed with grated daikon just before eating it.

Tapenade

The name for a dish of pureed or finely chopped olives, capers, and olive oil.it is a lovely dip served with beautiful bread or crackers and of course a lovely glass of wine on a lovely summers evening. Quick and simple to make it can also be used as a stuffing for poultry.

To continue reading the exciting culinary terms I have found for you then click this link…  

You will then be taken to Esme’s blog where I have a regular monthly post…

About Carol Taylor:

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention. I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and wellbeing.

The environment

This is also something I am passionate about there are now regular columns on my blog this year. It is important that we are mindful of the world we live in.  These honeybees dining on forget me knots say it all to me.

forget-me-not-257176_640

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to, then, I will be happy!

MeWe

More and more of my blogging friends have joined me on MeWe. A social media site which is fairly new and which promises much without the restrictions some other social media sites are choosing to impose on many of us.  Join me if you will on MeWe

Carol is a contributor to the Phuket Island Writers Anthology 

Connect to Carol
Blog
Twitter
Facebook
Pinterest
Email

Thank you once again for reading this post I hope you are all having a lovely week xx

For more posts from Carol working her way through the Culinary Alphabet 

CarolCooks2…Weekly Roundup…Spoiler Alerts, Sourdough and Just Living!

Welcome to my weekly roundup of posts I hope you have all had a productive week with lots of creative thoughts, no kitchen disasters and if you have please tell…haha

My week started with a look at my life through the years…Reliving memories I  also got a bit maudlin but overall a good life …

You know the routine by now…Settle down in your favourite chair, grab a drink and enjoy!

great reads a weekly roundup lady with electronic reader

You are the Author of your life…What did you do??? To find out about me…

Hopscotch and who made that elastic band thingy?? Jacks? Stilts? Runouts?

hop scotch

https://carolcooks2.com/2019/02/04/you-are-the-author-of-your-life-what-will-you-make-it-about/

No More Diets! Healthy Eating!...Have I been giving myself a talking to?? Oh Yes! Practice what you preach talking to…But you know what I feel better for it and have had a good week…Upped the walking and exercise knocked the sundowners on the head for now…I also worked out how much I would save …Yikes…Two months and I have funded a new laptop…

Any lost or misplaced kilos/lbs are a bonus…The papaya salsa is so tasty and my new favourite smoothie …Spoiler Alert! Tomatoes and Passionfruit…

papaya salsa

https://carolcooks2.com/2019/02/05/healthy-eating-no-more-diets-8/

It is now time to pop over to Sally’s for my Winter Warmers which this week for those of you experiencing bitter cold weather some hearty Stews and Casseroles.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/02/06/smorgasbord-blog-magazine-the-food-and-cookery-column-with-carol-taylor-winter-warmers-stews-and-casseroles/

Time for some music from Les Miserables…I dreamed a Dream…A beautiful song and lyrics…Waste Not! Want Not! Looks at the reality…Heartbreaking…

Tissue Alert!

https://carolcooks2.com/2019/02/07/waste-not-want-not-week-10/

Last week in my kitchen Things got Hot and spicy…Sourdough ..Take 2…A bit slow…Yesterday I went out and bought some different flour …Let’s see what today brings…I am not giving up…

Some new fruit for me also came into its growing season… The lovely Tamarind… Not strictly true as thus far I had only eaten and used the dried one…That lovely sticky tamarind which works in so many different dishes…This is the young tamarind before it is dried isn’t it pretty…Lovely colours…Sort of unicornish colours…Don’t you think?

fresh young tamarind fruit

Every time I go to the market I discover something new, different…

https://carolcooks2.com/2019/02/08/week-6-in-my-kitchen-sourdough-take-2-is-still-alive/

Lastly, Sally with her no-nonsense look at health…In life, some have had many operations others like me…Just two..Tonsils and one other… I openly admit I was scared..petrified is a better choice of word…Why? I wanted to first wake up…Secondly have no complications…The statistics are scary…I could spend hours and write a War and Peace length post but the bottom line is we need to prepare our bods the best way we can to give ourselves a fighting chance…

If you were in the Brownies, Girl Guides, Scouts, Woodcraft folks…Be prepared was the motto…

To get the low down and how to prepare head over to Sally’s and she will lead the way…

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/02/05/smorgasbord-health-column-new-statistics-on-surgery-recovery-that-are-shocking-and-preparing-for-an-operation/

Spoiler Alerts!

whats next post it note

Chinese New Year…Part 2…Fibre are we getting enough? Cigarette Butts, Golden Lily Oolong No. 12 …That’s it! 

No more spoilers…You will have to wait and see…xxx

Enjoy your Sunday and thank you for reading …xx

If you liked what you read please let me know in comments I love to hear all your comments xxx

About Carol Taylor:

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and wellbeing.

The environment is also something I am passionate about and there will be more on this on my blog this year

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…….Then, I will be happy!

Carol is a contributor to the Phuket Island Writers Anthology: https://www.amazon.com/Phuket-Island-Writers-Anthology-Stories-ebook/dp/B00RU5IYNS

Connect to Carol

Blog: https://carolcooks2.com/
Twitterhttps://twitter.com/TheRealCarolT
Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/carol.taylor.1422

Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/caroltaylor56/pins/

Thank you once again for reading this post I hope you all have a great week xx

Week 6…In my kitchen…Sourdough…Take 2 is still alive…

Welcome to week 6 in my kitchen, The good news is my sourdough starter…Take 2…Still lives…

Chinese New Year celebrations have been in full swing …Lots of lights, Lion dances, loud music and firecrackers…Not forgetting yummy food…All will be revealed soon when I collate all my pictures.

My new favourite Coconut cream just gets better… it keeps wonderfully in the fridge for a week which is the longest and it stiffened up nicely so I am thinking it would make a nice filling for cream slices, a swiss roll or gateaux…Another project and it is healthy…Who said healthy food was boring and bland???

Papaya Salsa was my new experiment…Papaya is classed as one of the worlds healthiest foods and Christopher Columbus likened it to a fruit of the angels…In a salsa?? I made a small bowl to start and was pleasantly surprised.

I used 1 ripe tomato, a cup of papaya, 1 spring onion, a small shallot, a handful of chopped coriander and a cheek of fresh lime. Cut everything up small and mixed together…It was very nice…I would make it again but will add just a little chilli…It has to be done…haha

Papaya tomato onion salsa

Eaten with my flatbreads ( last weeks post) it made a lovely little snack.

This weeks curry is for those hot curry lovers...I find seafood enhances the heat of the chillies…

This lovely spicy squid curry is not for the faint-hearted even I found it a tad hot.

But if you like a bit of heat, then this is just the curry for you.

Spicy Red Curried Squid.

This recipe is for two people but it is quite easy to double up the ingredients, it is also very quick to cook so prepare all your ingredients first and then in as much time as it takes to cook your rice you will have a beautiful curry.

Ingredients:

  • 200 gm squid cleaned and cut into rectangles I normally score mine with a sharp knife( it just makes them look prettier).
  • 1 shallot sliced
  • 2 cloves of garlic crushed and chopped
  • 1 tbsp Thai red curry paste
  • 1 tomato cut into 8
  • A handful of pea eggplants( optional)
  • Sm piece of fresh ginger finely cut into slivers or cubes
  • Black pepper
  • Half tbsp of coconut oil
  • 200 ml coconut milk
  • 1/2 to 1 tbsp fish sauce.
  • Sm bunch of Thai basil

Ok…Let’s Cook!

Heat the oil in a wok until it is very hot and add garlic, shallots and curry paste, stir fry for 30 seconds.

Note: The Thai red curry paste I get is a very hot one which I get freshly made from my local market.

Add tomatoes, ginger and pea eggplants if used and stir-fry for 1 minute.

Add squid and pepper and stir-fry for a further 1 minute.

Add coconut milk and fish sauce stir well and cook on low heat for 2 minutes, stir in Thai basil.

Thai spicy red curry squid

Serve with steamed rice and……. Enjoy!

You have probably noticed that my recipes are all cooked from scratch contain healthy ingredients which have proven health benefits…I am trying to break the mould or the myths that healthy food is bland and/or boring…There seems to be a barrier to me… we just need to know our food and what the benefits to our health is and cook accordingly.

I don’t spend hours in the kitchen and I don’t think that I buy special foods or expensive foods and I certainly don’t feel deprived in any way at all…It is also foods which we all eat ..grandkids included although we limit the heat for little Lily or take her portion out before we add all the chilli.

My newly discovered fruit this week was the young Tamarind I have seen it for the last few weeks at the market and my daughter-in-law was up last weekend and bought some.

fresh young tamarind fruit

The fruit inside starts off white and tastes nutty and as it ripens it goes pink and you can slightly taste a sourness, the last stage when it is dried and you get the dark sticky tamarind is maybe the tamarind you see for sale in bright red boxes in your supermarket.

Tamarind like many fruits and vegetables has a long history of healing and aiding stomach disorders and is used as a laxative.

Tamarind Preparations are used for fevers, sore throats, inflammation of joints and sunstroke. The leaves dried or boiled are made into poultices to help reduce swollen joints, sprains, boils, haemorrhoids and conjunctivitis.

 Dried this rather plain brown pod has the capacity to elevate your food to something else.

The family favourite this week was Pork filled rice flour skin wrappers…Our new favourite take away street food snack…

pork filled rice flour skins with peanut dip

It was worth the queue the young man was giving out numbers and I have never seen anyone work that fast…The whole family loved them…Translucent rice flour skins with a ground/minced pork filling made from scratch right in front of me with…. a new herb for me… Pandan, or screw pine, also called pandanus, daun pandan, and screw palm is a shrub with strap-shaped leaves reminiscent of palm leaves. The leaves are long, thin, and narrow with a deep green colour, and are sold fresh, frozen, or dried.

I have used pandan to wrap and cook chicken in and as a colouring for a dessert but never sliced and used in a savoury dish much like I would use other herbs.

Some species of this plant have highly aromatic leaves that are prized in cooking. The flowers are also aromatic, and an extract called kewra(or keora) is made from them and used in Indian milk-based sweets. They are widely used throughout Southeast Asia and other tropical regions.

Have a great weekend and please share with us anything you have made this week or even any kitchen disasters all your comments make my day xxx

About Carol Taylor:

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetable ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use contain to improve our health and wellbeing.

The environment is also something I am passionate about and there will be more on this on my blog this year

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…….Then, I will be happy!

Carol is a contributor to the Phuket Island Writers Anthology: https://www.amazon.com/Phuket-Island-Writers-Anthology-Stories-ebook/dp/B00RU5IYNS

Connect to Carol

Blog: https://carolcooks2.com/
Twitterhttps://twitter.com/TheRealCarolT
Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/carol.taylor.1422

Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/caroltaylor56/pins/

Thank you once again for reading this post I hope you all have a great weekend xx

The Tamarind Tree

tamarind-636962_1920

 

The Tamarind is a leguminous tree which grows in tropical climates. Originally from Africa, it now grows in tropical regions around the globe being most common in South Asia and Mexico.

Its fruits are called an indehiscent legume which means that it doesn’t open naturally when it reaches maturity. Inside the fruit are a few large seeds and a sticky, tart pulp which when dried is even more tart.

shelled tamarind Fruit

The largest producer today is India although Thailand and Mexico are major producers.

It is used in everything from desserts to wonderful chutneys. It can be eaten fresh or dried it is sweet but a little tart and a small amount goes a long way.

The pulp can be eaten alone or with a little sugar to make it less tart and to give it a much more mellow flavour.

I use it a lot in cooking and I think my favourite dishes are:

 Tamarind prawns and beef rendang. The addition of tamarind to your cooking takes your dish to another level.

Beef Rendang is a recipe given to me by my friend Mamik and it is very nice and the beef is amazing. It is also my go-to recipe if I want that special dish to impress.

Ingredients:

2” Galangal

2” Ginger

1kg beef (Bottom Round)

1-litre  Coconut Milk (3 sm tins and made to one litre with water)

Grind together and put on one side, 1 tbsp Coriander seeds, 1 tsp Cumin seeds and 1 tsp white peppercorns.

2 Star Anise.

Half cup toasted coconut (pound in pestle until oil is released and it looks like a paste.)

1 Turmeric Leaf (Leave leaf whole but tear side to stem along leaf) this releases the flavour.

2 stems lemongrass crushed along the stem.

2 Lime leaves.

Soak 1-2 tsp Tamarind pulp in a little water and set aside for later.

Curry Paste:

Blitz the next 4 ingredients together to make the curry paste.

2cm Fresh Turmeric.

10 Shallots

5 Cloves Garlic

10 large red chillies (deseed if you want a milder curry)

To make Curry:

Cut beef into large cubes.

Put a tbsp oil of your choice in a cooking pot (I use a wok). Add Curry paste and cook and stir for 5 mins, add beef and stir to combine. Add coconut milk/water mixture and stir to combine.

Slowly bring to a gentle simmer, add torn turmeric leaf, lemongrass and lime leaves and star anise.

Cover pan and cook until meat is tender at least 3 hrs on a low simmer, stirring occasionally.

Add the ground coconut paste about half hour before the end of the cooking time and also the tamarind liquid and this is when the magic happens and the taste goes from just another curry to something wonderful.

When the meat is cooked and tender remove the turmeric leaf and lemon grass stalks although if we are not eating the curry until the next day I leave them and remove them before we eat the curry.

This curry should traditionally have a very thick paste and is also best eaten the next day to allow the flavours to develop.

However, as Europeans prefer a runnier sauce you can choose not to reduce down as much.

Enjoy!

 Tamarind is also great as a marinade for meat as it breaks down and tenderises tougher cuts of meat. It is used to make jams and syrups it is also one of the secret ingredients of Lea & Perrins  Worcestershire sauce which is a fermented sauce which has any uses.

Great in smoothies mango and tamarind smoothie is very nice it also has many other culinary uses.

This little dip is a recipe from Bali very easy to make but made more special by the addition of tamarind.

Called Rujak sauce it is lovely with mangoes.

Take 200gm of palm sugar shaved.

15 gm of tamarind flesh and 5 tbsp of water leave to infuse for 5 mins and then drain and keep the tamarind flavoured water.

6 or more Thai chillies.

1/4tsp shrimp paste and 1/4tsp salt.

Blitz all these ingredients together and you have fiery little sauce.

Health Benefits of Tamarind.

This picture shows the green pods of the Tamarind tree before they ripen and what a magnificent tree it is.

green unripe TAMARIND PODS

Tamarind like many fruits and vegetables has a long history of healing and aiding stomach disorders and is used as a laxative.

Tamarind Preparations are used for fevers, sore throats, inflammation of joints and sunstroke. The leaves dried or boiled are made into poultices to help reduce swollen joints, sprains, boils, haemorrhoids and conjunctivitis.

I hope you enjoyed reading about this rather plain brown pod with the capacity to elevate your food to something else.

Images are my own or from Pixabay and require no attribution.

Thank you for reading this post I hope you enjoyed it…If you did please reblog or share and let me know what you do with Tamarind in the comments if you use it….It would be lovely to chat with you…I always reply….

Thai Lemon Grass Salad(Yum Takrai)

SAM_2834

This recipe is for all you veggies as promised. I personally love this salad it is so fresh and vibrant, you could leave out the dried shrimp if you really eat no meat or fish products, slightly different taste but still good as if I don’t have any to hand then I leave them out.

Yum Takrai (Spicy Lemon grass Salad)

15 stalks fresh lemongrass.

14 cup finely chopped ginger

2 tbsp. toasted cashews
2 tbsp. whole dried shrimp
1 12 tbsp. fish sauce
1 12 tbsp. fresh lime juice
1/2-1 12 tbsp. sugar
1 tbsp. whole dried shrimp, finely ground
4-6 red Thai chillies, stemmed and thinly sliced
2 shallots, very thinly sliced lengthwise
3 raw stemmed long beans, cut into 4″ pieces for garnish.
Method:
Trim and slice lemon grass very finely. Transfer lemongrass slices to a medium bowl, separate rings with your fingers. Add ginger, cashews, shrimp, fish sauce, lime juice, sugar, ground shrimp, Thai chiles, and shallots, and toss well. Garnish with long beans. Serve on Banana Leaf or Betel Leaf as in my picture.
Serve with steamed jasmine rice or cauliflower rice if eating Gluten free.
.SAM_2834
We also serve with a tamarind sauce made by combing 3 tbsp tamarind pulp with cup water in small pan, bring to boil and simmer 5 mins.
Remove from heat and stand 15 mins you can help break tamarind down with a spoon, strain through sieve extracting as much liquid as possible.
Add 2cm peeled finely chopped ginger and 2 cloves finely chopped garlic, 11/2 tbsp palm sugar,2 tsp fish sauce,1 tbsp chilli/garlic sauce and 1 tsp soy sauce to tamarind liquid. Bring to boil, simmer 5 mins.
Whisk 1 tbsp cornflour with little water whisk into sauce cook 1 min or until thickens.
Taste and adjust seasoning add more sugar if required.
Keeps in an airtight container in the fridge for up to one week.
I hope you enjoy this little salad, if you love Thai food then please have a look around my blog for more authentic Thai Recipes.
Love you all xxx