Tag Archives: #toad in the hole

CarolCooks2 weekly roundup…November 14th-20th 2021…Culinary A-Z, Recipes for “Toad in the Hole”, “Fig Newtons”, Music and Carol’s Green Kitchen “Christmas Special”…

My Culinary A-Z,  Toad in the Hole, Fig Newtons  …Music by Earth, Wind and Fire and more …Oh Yes!, so much more!

I cannot believe we are nearly 3 weeks into November and coming up to 3 yrs of covid who would have thunk 2 years ago? It’s also” Stir Up Sunday” today when if you haven’t already it’s time to get together and make those puddings …Have fun and make a wish…

Welcome to my weekly roundup...The Fig Newtons were delicious…thank you to everyone who gave me some pastry tips they were much appreciated…

The week started with my first attempt at making Fig Newtons or Fig Rolls if you hail from the UK…as I type there is one left looking awfully sorry for itself…but I am determined not to eat it…They were very nice but I am sticking to my regime to drop a few pounds before the festive season kicks in…so sample them I did and then drew the line…my testers love them so armed with tips for rolling pastry from my fabulous readers the second batch will soon be made…

CarolCooks2…Today in my Test Kitchen …Fig Newtons…Take One!

Carol Taylor’s Green Kitchen Christmas Special!

A bumper edition of ideas for a sustainable Christmas and some Christmas Recipes I hope you enjoy…It is also Stir Up Sunday today time to make your Christmas Puddings… just click the link for some delicious Christmas Pudding recipes…and don’t forget to make a wish x

Smorgasbord Food Column – Carol Taylor’s Green Kitchen – Christmas Special 2021 – DIY presents, Sustainable Trees and Gifts, Cheesecake and Pickles.

Not forgetting of course that it is Sweet Potato Awareness Month and today is National Stuffing Day…Click this link for all your Christmas Stuffing recipes …Sweet Potatoes are one of my favourite vegetables…this recipe is easy to make and a favourite with even the family members who say they don’t like sweet potatoes…Bacon changes most peoples minds…smile…

Spicy sweet potato balls with cream cheese and bacon.

Ingredients:

• 2 sweet potatoes
• 2 spring onions finely chopped
• 2 cloves garlic finely chopped or grated
• 1-2 tsp red curry paste
• 3 rashers of bacon cooked until crispy
• Cream cheese
• Breadcrumbs to coat
• Oil to cook

Let’s Cook!

  • Wash and cook the sweet potatoes in the oven until soft…
  • When cooked allow to call a little and then remove the skins and mash with a little oil or butter then add the garlic, spring onions and red curry paste.
  • Combine well and season to taste.
  • Chop your cooked bacon and add to the cream cheese.
  • Take a good spoonful of the sweet potato mix form into a ball and make an indent then push the cream cheese and bacon into the whole and then make it into a ball again. Repeat until all your potato is used.
  • Roll the balls into some breadcrumbs you may need to use some milk or egg to get them to stick.

 

  • Heat your oil and cook in batches just be careful as sweet potatoes have a tendency to brown quicker than ordinary potatoes.
  • Serve as a starter or snack with a sweet chilli sauce …Enjoy!

Next, it was The Culinary Alphabet with the middle letter of S…The Letter S is quite easy I have left some for Pete and Chel…Have fun guys Looking forward to what you come up with …You will have to read the post and the comments to see what Chel and Pete came up with they did good!

The Culinary Alphabet…A-Z…The Middle Letter S…

Over the last six weeks, Sally has shared the nutrients we need to be healthy and their main food sources. You just need to cut and paste it into word and print it off…How easy is that? #recommended read.

First a reminder of the basic nutrients we need for energy and healthy functioning systems and organs and the main food sources.

  • Vitamins and anti-oxidants – A, B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, B9 (Folate) B12, C, D, E, K,
  • Minerals – Calcium, chloride, chromium, copper, iodine, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, potassium, selenium, sodium, zinc.
  • Amino Acids –
  • Essential Fatty Acids –
  • Bioflavonoids –V
  • Very strong anti-oxidants.

To read the full original post please click the link below…

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2021/11/18/smorgasbord-health-column-nutrients-the-body-needs-print-off-weekly-grocery-shopping-list-by-sally-cronin-2/

CarolCooks2 in my kitchen…”Toad in the Hole”

A recipe learnt from my mum…Toad in the Hole…

We British have a way with words and we have a few strange sounding names for some of our food dishes…take ‘Spotted Dick”,  a “One-eyed Sandwich” ‘Stargazy Pie”, ‘Pigs in Blankets” or “Bubble and Squeak”….all foods of my childhood…

CarolCooks2…in my kitchen…Todays Recipe “Toad in the Hole “

Saturday Snippets…

Welcome back to Saturday Snippets..where I indulge my whimsy and have a play with one word prompts…My muse has answered me and this week my word is…Earth!…

Saturday Snippets are often written on the fly…very rarely planned unless someone has given me a prompt word… in the last 4 weeks, they have followed a sort of theme…Soap, Water, Fire, Wind…and now ” Earth” to complete the trio and with none other than some great tracks from Earth, Wind and Fire!

This brings me to one of my favourite bands of all time…I have listened danced to them over the years…Please click the link below to listen to the wonderful Earth, Wind and Fire!

Saturday Snippets 20th November 2021…Earth!

Thank you for joining me today I hope you have enjoyed the catchup…I look forward to your comments as always…Have an enjoyable Sunday and if you are stirring those Christmas Puddings make a wish…

See you tomorrow XX

 

CarolCooks2…in my kitchen…Todays Recipe “Toad in the Hole “

A recipe learnt from my mum…Toad in the Hole…

We British have a way with words and we have a few strange sounding names for some of our food dishes…take ‘Spotted Dick”,  a “One-eyed Sandwich” ‘Stargazy Pie” or “Bubble and Squeak”….all foods of my childhood…

Toad in the Hole dates back to the 18th century and was probably initial y a way of eeking out the meat…any meat like beef, mutton or offal was used originally although my mother only used sausages and maybe added some onions to the batter…

The dish with leftover meat was originally not called toad in the hole. In the 1787 book A Provincial Glossary, for example, it was referred to as “meat boiled in a crust”. The first mention of the word “hole”, outside of Pigeons in a Hole found in the cookbook by Hannah Glasse, appeared in the 1900 publication Notes & Queries, which described the dish as a “batter-pudding with a hole in the middle containing meat”. Despite popular belief, there is no record of the dish ever being made with toad the origin of the name is unclear, but it may refer to the way toads wait for their prey in their burrows, making their heads visible in the earth, just like the sausages peep through the batter. It may also derive from the “entombed animal” phenomenon of live frogs or toads being found encased in stone, which was a scientific fad of the late 18th century…source https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toad_in_the_hole.

I can assure everyone that no toads were hurt in the making of this dish…

Of course, this dish can be made any size for 1, 2 or 10 people…just adjust the amount of batter you make accordingly for this recipe I am assuming 4/5 people depending on their appetite and the size of your sausages…x

Ingredients:

12 Chipolatas or sausages of your choice

Splash olive oil

Batter:

  • 140g plain flour
  • 2 eggs
  • 175ml milk
  • good pinch of salt

Lets Cook!

Firstly let’s get the oven on to heat up… 220C/200C fan/gas 7.

Put the chipolatas in a 20 x 30cm roasting tin with a splash of oil and bake for 15 mins until browned.

Meanwhile, make the batter. Tip the flour into a bowl with ½ tsp salt, make a well in the middle and crack the eggs into it. You can which by hand or use an electric whisk to mix it together, then slowly add the milk, whisking all the time.

Leave to stand until the sausages are nice and brown.

Remove the sausages from the oven – be careful because the fat will be sizzling hot – but if it isn’t, put the tin on the hob for a few minutes until it is…it is important that the oil is hot and sizzling before you tip in your batter…it all helps the pudding to rise…

Pour in the batter mix, transfer to the top shelf of the oven, then cook for 25-30 mins, until risen and golden. Serve with gravy and your favourite veg and or some creamy mashed potato…

That’s it!…nice and easy to make …Enjoy your “Toad in the Hole”

 

 

The Culinary Alphabet…A-Z…The Middle Letter S…

Welcome to series 3 of the Culinary Alphabet A-Z…Where the middle letter is S…

So what’s in store? In this series the A, B, C, etc will be the middle letter, for example, Jarlsberg, Korma, Apple and Tursu a variety of Turkish pickled vegetables… how easy that will be who knows I am sure some of the letters of the alphabet could cause the grey matter to rebel or implode…haha…I also don’t want to use plurals to form a word as I may need that word for another letter and it’s sort of cheating I think…unless of course I really get stuck…which I am sure will happen…The Letter S is quite easy I have left some for Pete and Chel…Have fun guys Looking forward to what you come up with …

Today it is words where the middle letter is S.

Let’s go and see what I have found…

Olosapo Fruit…

What would happen if sweet eggs hatched from a tree. This Central American fruit is rarely sold commercially it is more of a backyard fruit or found in its native habitat when foraging.

The flavour of a ripe olosapo is said to be like a refined egg custard: sweet, egg-like, and sometimes with a touch of sharp cheese. Some liken the flavour of the dense, fibrous pulp to butterscotch. Foragers most commonly eat the fruit out of hand, but you can also blend it into smoothies, ice cream, or milkshakes. It can also make a handy egg substitute in sweet recipes, such as an egg-free “eggnog.”

The unripe fruit is green and extremely astringent, so be sure to wait until the skin turns bright yellow, with lumpy pockmarked skin, and yields to light pressure. When in doubt, the best way to tell that it’s ready to eat is to wait until one falls to the ground and hope that you get to it before any animals do…

Basil…

One of my favourite herbs there are an estimated  50 to 150 species of basil, most, but not all, culinary basils are cultivars of O. basilicum or sweet basil. Some are cultivars of other basil species, and others are hybrids. It is particularly challenging to determine which species basil belongs to…Clove Basil is one I would love to try and am on the hunt for at the moment.

Basil is a herb in the mint family. It adds flavour to meals, and its nutrients may provide health benefits. Sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum) plays a role in many Mediterranean, and particularly Italian, cuisines. It forms the basis of pesto and adds a distinctive flavour to salads, pasta, pizza, and other dishes.

Berkswell…

Berkswell is both an English village in Warwickshire and a cheese…made using unpasteurised ewes milk and animal rennet.

The moulds of cheeses are left in plastic kitchen colanders which give the cheese its distinctive shape. Berkswell is oft compared to a mature pecorino.

Brisket…

A lovely cut of beef which if correctly cooked just melts in the mouth and with horseradish sauce…delicious…The flat cut makes up the majority of the brisket. It’s long and thin with a thick layer of fat on top that keeps the meat moist when cooked. This cut is best for slicing and most likely what you’ll find in your supermarket. It’s also the best cut of brisket to use for Homemade Corned Beef…

Croissant…

Of Austrian origin but mostly associated with France is that delicious buttery, flaky pastry…some people equate croissants as bread. In fact, croissants are one type of pastry. The basic difference between bread and pastry is that pastry is made from ingredients with high-fat content so that the pastry has a flaky texture…

Jarlsberg Cheese…

A Swiss cheese from Norway is known as “Baby Swiss,” but this cheese is no youngster. Jarlsberg was first made from 1815 to 1832 at the Jarlsberg Manor near the famous Oslo Fjord… a fantastic table cheese that also works well in a variety of sandwiches and cooked dishes.

Kasseri…

Kasseri is a traditional, Greek-Turkish cheese made from unpasteurised sheep milk with no more than 20% goat milk mixed in…You wouldn’t guess that I love my cheese, would you…lol…Maasdam…is another favourite cheese …

Lobster…

Years ago because of the abundance of lobster plus it also meant colonists had easy access to protein during bad seasons or harvests, lobster quickly garnered a reputation as the poor man’s meal. They were fed to prisoners, apprentices, and slaves as a way to save money…then in the mid-1800’s it became the most popular canned product on the market…from there the demand for fresh lobster increased as did the prices…now for most lobster is a delicacy…

There is nothing like a beautifully cooked lobster tail..one of my all-time favourite meals…

Milkshake…

Who doesn’t love a nice freshly made milkshake..of course, there are milkshakes and milkshakes…Fresh is best no nasties like this …Some of the Ingredients which are in your food outlet milkshake: Sugar, Cream, Corn Syrup, Mono and Diglycerides, Cellulose Gum, Guar Gum, Carrageenan, Vitamin A Palmitate…Ugh!

Parsnip…

I love parsnips although I have to rely on them coming over in someone’s suitcase which hasn’t happened lately and probably not for a while either…they are indeed a lovely vegetable roasted or pureed or as parsnip crisps…

Paska Bread…

Paska is what many Ukrainians and other Eastern Europeans call their Easter Bread. In Russia, they call it Kulich. Typical Paska Easter Bread is made with eggs, flour, sugar and lots of butter and is similar to Italian Panettone.

Parsley…

Widely used as a fresh culinary herb or dried spice. It’s bright green in colour and has a mild, bitter flavour that pairs well with many recipes…A lovely parsley sauce with steamed fish that my mother used to make is a childhood memory…

Often labelled as one of the most powerful disease-fighting plants, parsley provides great nutritional value and offers many potential health benefits.

Poussin…

It’s a chook…in Commonwealth countries, poussin is a butcher’s term for a young chicken, less than 28 days old at slaughter and usually weighing 400–450 grams but not above 750 grams. It is sometimes also called spring chicken, although the term spring chicken usually refers to chickens weighing 750–850 grams…a young chook!

Salsify…

An ancient food that has seen an upsurge in its popularity…originating from the Mediterranean, where ancient Greeks and Romans harvested the roots for both food and medicine…it is a long, thin root vegetable that’s a member of the dandelion family. It looks similar to a medium or large carrot or parsnip. Black salsify is immediately recognizable by its dark, nearly black, smooth skin while white salsify has brown or tan skin and is more “hairy.” Both varieties have white flesh that looks similar to a turnip…you can boil it, mash it, put it in your favourite soups and stews or simply cube it and sauté it in butter with its greens. You can even use it in place of potatoes in au gratin or scalloped potatoes recipes.

Sausage…

The sausage needs no introduction …Every country has a unique sausage tradition and puts its own twist on the classic meat filling. Even within single countries, there is a huge amount of diversity and slightly different variations of sausage in the US alone there are over 200 varieties. Even if you consider yourself highly educated on the topic I’m betting that there are a few sausages out there that you’ve never even heard of — much less tried.

Toad in the Hole…this dish needed some explanation when I put it on our restaurant menu…plainly put it is sausages cooked in batter like Yorkshire pudding with sausages…I thought I had written a toad in the hole recipe on my blog but it appears I haven’t…I will be doing so though maybe tomorrow or next week…What’s your favourite sausage?

Sushi…

Sushi is made of small pieces of raw fish that are wrapped in rice and seaweed. … The chefs use a type of vinegar that is made from fermented rice to flavour the rice that is used to surround the fish and spices. Finally, the roll is wrapped up with some of the nori…originating from Japan the story began in paddy fields in China, where fish was fermented with vinegar, salt and rice, after which the rice was discarded…

The dish spread from China to Japan in the 8th century. The first reference to “sushi” appeared in the Yoro Code, written in the year 718…where it very quickly became ingrained in the Japanese culture…

Vichyssoise…

Is a chilled creamy potato and leek soup, that was introduced to Americans by French chef Louis Diat at the Ritz-Carlton in New York in the summer of 1917, to help keep patrons cool.

Chilled soups used to be a lot more popular then than they are today, especially before WWII and modern air conditioning.

Whetstone…

An essential piece of my kitchen equipment…put simply it is a sharpening stone there is nothing worse than a blunt kitchen knife is there?

Thank you for joining me today S was quite easy .. I have saved quite a few for Pete Springer who always contributes…Thank you, Pete… and Chel it seems is back on the blogging scene after having another sweet baby boy so maybe she will some thoughts between sleeping and the feeding of little bubba …no pressure of course x

Until tomorrow..stay safe and laugh a lot…Thank you for joining me I look forward to your comments as always xx